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Full text of "State record North Carolina"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

NCSU Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/staterecordnorth1963nort 



TH CAROLINA STATE RECORD 




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NORTH CAROLINA STATE RECORD 

Published monthly by North Carolina State of the University of North Carolina at 
Raleigh, Office of Information Services, Holladay Hall, excepting in March, June, 
September, and December. Second class postage paid at the post office at Raleigh, 
North Carolina. 

VOLUME 63 NUMBER 2 NOVEMBER, 1963 



North Carolina State of tlie Univ^ersity 
of North Carolina at Raleigh 



^JORTH CAROLINA 



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GENERAL CATALOG 



Catalog Issue 1962-1964 
announcements for Sessions 1962-963, 1963-1964 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE 

OF THE UNVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

AT RALEIGH 

Contenf-s 

Officers of Administration 5 

Calendar 7 

General Information 1 1 

History 1 1 

Campus 11 

Services 12 

Summary of Enrollment 12 

Admission Requirements 13 

Grades and Scholarships 17 

General Policies 20 

Residence Status for Tuition Payment 21 

Tuition and Fees 22 

Student Activities and Services 27 

Military Training 41 

Schools and Programs of Study 47 

School of Agriculture 51 

School of Design 101 

School of Education , 1 1 1 

School of Engineering 127 

School of Forestry 179 

School of Liberal Arts 195 

School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics 203 

School of Textiles 215 

Graduate School 233 

College Extension Division 235 

Descriptions of Courses 239 

Administration and Faculty 389 

Alumni Association 389 

College Foundations 390 

Trustees 392 

Teaching and Professional Faculty 395 

Emeriti Faculty 420 

Special Staff 422 

Accreditations and Memberships 423 



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THE CONSOLIDATED UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 
(General Administrotive Officers at Chapel Hill) 

By act of the General Assembly of 1931 the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the 
North Carolina College for Women at Greensboro, and the North Carolina State College of 
Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh were consolidated into the University of North 
Carolina. 

The administrative officers of The University of North Carolina include: 

William Clyde Friday, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., President 

Vice President and Finance Officer (Position Vacant) 

Donald Benton Anderson, B.A., B.Sc, Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President for Graduate 

Studies and Research 
Alexander Hurlbutt Shepard, Jr., A.B., M.A., Business Officer and Treasurer 
Frederick Henry Weaver, A.B., M.A., Secretary 

The Vice President and Finance Officer has general administrative responsibilities and is 
specifically concerned with the development programs of the University, the presentation of 
University budget requests to the several agencies of State Government, the Escheats Fund, 
and relationships with national foundations and agencies of the Federal Government. 

The Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research, working with the University Grad- 
uate Executive Council and the three Deans of the Graduate School, has the responsibility for 
the coordination of the graduate offerings and research programs of the University. 

The Business Officer and Treasurer has the responsibility of overall supervision of the 
preparation of the University budget requests and the expenditure of authorized budgets. 
This officer is also responsible for the administration within the University of those enact- 
ments of the General Assemblies that relate to the classification of personnel under the State 
Personnel Act. 

The Secretary of the University performs general administrative duties and is the principal 
liaison officer with the Board of Trustees. 

Each of these officers and the Chancellors of the component institutions are responsible to 
the President as the principal executive officer of the University of North Carolina. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 
OF AGRICULTURE AND ENGINEERING 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

CHANCELLOR 

John Tyler Caldwell, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., "A" Holladay Hall 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Harry C. Kelly, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty, 110 Holladay Hall 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

H. Brooks James, Dean, 1 15 Patterson Hall 

D. S. Weaver, Special Assistant to the Dean, 110 Patterson Hall 

E. W. Glazener, Director of Instruction, 1 1 1 Patterson Hall 
R. L. Lovvorn, Director, Research, 107 Patterson Hall 

George Hyatt, Director, Agricultural Extension Service, 104 Ricks Hall 
Charles W. Williams, Administrative Officer, 101-B Patterson Hall 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN 

Henry L. Kamphoefner, Dean, 200 Brooks Hall 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

J. Bryant Kirkland, Dean, 119 Tompkins Hall 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Ralph E. Fadum, Dean, 229 Riddick Building 

R. G. Carson, Jr., Director of Instruction, 232 Riddick Building 

N. W. Conner, Director, Engineering Research, 129 Riddick Building 

W. C. Bell, Director, Industrial Experimental Service, 3 lES Building 

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 

Richard J. Preston, Dean, 160 Kilgore Hall 
SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Fred V. Cahill, Jr., Dean, 162 Harrelson Hall 
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

Arthur Clayton Menius, Jr., Dean, 118 Riddick Building 

Carey G. Mumford, Assistant to the Dean, 1 19 Riddick Building 

SCHOOL OF TEXTILES 

Malcolm E. Campbell, Dean, 101 Nelson Building 

COLLEGE EXTENSION 

Edward W. Ruggies, Director, College Extension Division, 118 1911 Building 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Walter J. Peterson, Dean, 145 Gardner Hall 

LIBRARY 

Harlan C. Brown, Librarian, 132 D. H. Hill Library 

WUNC-TV 

George L. Hall, Director of Television 
STUDENT AFFAIRS 

James J. Stewart, Jr., Dean, 101 Holladay Hall 
ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION 

K. D. Raab, Director, 13 Holladay Hall 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

B. C. Talley, Jr., Director, 206 Holladay Hall 
RELIGIOUS PROGRAMS 

O. B. Wooldridge, Jr., Director, King Religious Center 
MUSIC ACTIVITIES 

J. Perry Watson, Director, 104 Pullen Hall 
COLLEGE UNION 

Henry Bowers, Director, College Union 
Richard S. Heaton, Associate Director, College Union 
STUDENT HOUSING 

N. B. Watts, Director, 207 Holladay Hall 
James S. Fulghum, Jr., Housing Rental Officer, Leazor Hall 
DEPARTMENT OF COUNSELING 

Lyie B. Rogers, Director, 201 Holladay Hall 
Kingston Johns, Jr., Financial Aid Officer, 207 Holladay Hal! 
STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

J. J. Combs, College Physician, Clark Infirmary 
MILITARY TRAINING 

Air Force ROTC, Col. James D. Howder, 145 Coliseum 
Army ROTC, Col. L. W. Merriom, 154 Coliseum 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

Roy B. Clogston, Athletics Director and Director of Coliseum, 105 Coliseum 
DEVELOPMENT AFFAIRS 

L. L. Roy, Director, Development and Foundations, "A" Holladay Hall 
H. W. Taylor, Director, Alumni Affairs, 103 Alumni Building 
Hardy D. Berry, Director, Information Services, Watauga Hall 

BUSINESS AFFAIRS 

W. L. Turner, Business Manager, Holladay Hall 

John D. Wright, Assistant Budget Officer, "B" Holladay Hall 

John C. Williams, Purchasing Agent, 107 1911 Building 

J. McCree Smith, Director, Maintenance and Operations, College Engineer, Morris Building 

Fred V. Coleman, Slater Food Service, Leazor Dining Hall 

L. L. Ivey, Manager of Student Stores, SSS Building 



Spring Semester, 1963 



Calendar 



Jan. 


31 


Feb. 


1 


Feb. 


4 


Feb. 


8 


Feb. 


15 


Feb. 


22 


March 23 


Apri 


1 5 


Apri: 


1 11 


Apri 


1 17 


May 


22 


May 


23 


May 


24-31 


June 


1 



Thursday Orientation of new students. 

Friday Registration. Late registration fee of $5.00 payable 

by all who register after Feb. 1. 
Monday Classes begin at 8:00 a.m. 

Friday Last day to register. Last day for refund less $5.00 

registration fee. 
Friday Last day to add a course. 

Friday Last day to drop a course without failure. 

Saturday Mid-term reports. 

Friday Last day for withdrawing from school without 

failures. 
Thursday Easter holidays begin at 12:00 noon. 

Wednesday Classwork resumes at 8:00 a.m. 

Wednesday Last day of classes. 

Thursday Reading day. 

Friday-Friday Final examinations. 

Saturday Commencement. 



Summer Sessions, 1963 



First Session 




June 10 
June 11 


Monday 
Tuesday 


June 12 
June 17 


Wednesday 
Monday 


June 21 


Friday 


July 4-5 
July 18 
July 19 


Thursday-Friday 

Thursday 

Friday 


Second Session 




July 19 
July 22 


Friday 

Monday 


July 23 
July 29 


Tuesday 
Monday 



Aug. 2 

Aug. 23 
Aug. 24 



Friday 

Friday 
Saturday 



New student orientation. 

Registration and fee payment for regular session. 
Late registration fee of $5.00 payable by all regis- 
tering after June 11. 
First day of classes. 

Last day for registration. Last day to withdraw with 
refund and last day to drop any course with refund. 
Last day to drop courses without failure and last 
day to withdraw without failure. 
Holidays. 

Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



New student orientation. 

Registration and fee payment. Late registration fee 

of $5.00 payable by all registering after July 22. 

First day of classes. 

Last day for registration. Last day to withdraw 

with refund and last day to drop any course with 

refund. 

Last day to drop courses without failure and last 

day to withdraw without failure. 

Last day of classes. 

Final examinations. 



Fall Semester, 1963 



Sept. 9 


Monday 


Sept. 9-11 


Monday-Wednesday 


Sept. 12 


Thursday 


Sept. 13 


Friday 


Sept. 13-14 


Friday-Saturday 


Sept. 16 


Monday 


Sept. 20 


Friday 


Sept. 27 


Friday 


Oct. 4 


Friday 


Nov. 9 


Saturday 


Nov. 27 


Wednesday 


Dec. 2 


Monday 


Dec. 3 


Tuesday 


Dec. 19 


Thursday 


Jan. 6, 1964 


Monday 


Jan. 15 


Wednesday 


Jan. 16 


Thursday 


Jan. 17-24 


Friday-Friday 



General faculty meeting. 

New student orientation. 

Freshman registration. 

Upperclassman registration. Late registration fee 

of $5.00 payable by all who register after Sept. 13. 

Continuation of freshman orientation. 

Classes begin at 8:00 a.m. 

Last day for registration. Last day to withdraw 

with refund less $5.00 registration fee. 

Last day to add a course. 

Last day to drop a course without failure. 

Mid-term reports. 

Thanksgiving holidays begin at 1:00 p.m. 

Classwork resumes at 8:00 a.m. 

Last day to withdraw from school without failures. 

Christmas holidays begin at 6:00 p.m. 

Classwork resumes at 8:00 a.m. 

Last day of classes. 

Reading day. 

Final examinations. 



Spring Semester, 1964 



Jan. 30 


Thursday 


Jan. 31 


Friday 


Feb. 3 


Monday 


Feb. 7 


Friday 


Feb. 14 


Friday 


Feb. 21 


Friday 


March 21 


Saturday 


March 25 


Wednesday 


March 30 


Tuesday 


April 6 


Monday 


May 20 


Wednesday 


May 21 


Thursday 


May 22-29 


Friday-Friday 


May 30 


Saturday 



New student orientation. 

Registration. Late registration fee of $5.00 payable 

by all who register after Jan. 31. 

Classes begin at 8:00 a.m. 

Last day to register. Last day to withdraw with 

refund less $5.00 registration fee. 

Last day to add a course. 

Last day to drop a course without failure. 

Mid-term reports. 

Easter holidays begin at 6:00 p.m. 

Classwork resumes at 8:00 a.m. 

Last day for withdrawing from school without 

failures. 

Last day of classes. 

Reading day. 

Final examinations. 

Commencement. 



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II 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



History 



North Carolina State College, the State's technological institution of 
higher learning and Land-Grant College, was founded by legislative act on 
March 7, 1887. Prior to this time, the Morrill Act of 1862 authorized the 
use of public land or its equivalent in land script for the creation of an 
agricultural and mechanical college in each State. North Carolina did not 
establish such a specialized institution until State College was founded. 

First named the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic 
Arts, the institution began operations with 45 students and six teachers 
on October 3, 1889. The first president was Colonel Alexander Q. Holladay 
for whom the first building was later named. 

The College's name was changed to the North Carolina State College 
of Agriculture and Engineering in 1917. In 1931, the North Carolina 
General Assembly formed the Consolidated University of North Carolina, 
embracing the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, the North 
Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering in Raleigh, and the 
Woman's College in Greensboro. 

After World \Var II, returning sendee men nearly tripled any previous 
State College enrollment. Today, State College is one of the best-housed 
and best-equipped technological institutions of higher learning in the 
nation. Through its expanded operations, State College has grown in size 
and service to the people of North Carolina and in prestige throughout 
the nation and the world for its diverse programs in teaching, research, 
and extension services. At the beginning of the 1961 fall semester the stu- 
dent body numbered more than 7,000 young men and women with 660 
members of the teaching staff and a total staff of nearly 3,000 persons includ- 
ing administrative, extension, and research personnel across the State. 

Campus 

Adjoining the central North Carolina State College campus at Raleigh are 
the College farms. In addition to these holdings in the Raleigh area, the 
State College Experiment Station operates a number of forest farms in every 
geographical area of the State, and the School of Forestry has large holdings 
of experimental woodlands in the Coastal Plain, the Piedmont, and the 
mountain regions of North Carolina. 



12 The General Catalog 

The College's physical plant is valued at over $50,000,000 with a multi- 
million dollar construction program now in progress. The College has 73 
major buildings. 

Of the buildings, new and old, a few deserve special mention. 

Harrelson Hall . . . circular classroom building, can seat 3,500 students 
at a time in 77 classrooms which can hold 18 to 189 students. 

William D. Carmichael Gymnasium . . . valued at approximately $2,600,- 
000, features modern facilities. 

Bragaw Dormitory . . . first occupied in 1958, built at a cost of $2,000,000, 
all corridors are on the outside. 

Student Supply Store . . . ultra-modern structure, offers reading material 
ranging from 25-cent paperbacks to the latest engineering encyclopedia. 

Memorial Tower ... a 116-foot campanile of white Mount Airy granite, 
is a monument to the State College men who lost their lives in World War I. 

Holladay Hall . . . oldest building on campus, once the total college 
plant, completely remodeled inside, housing administration. 

William Neal Reynolds Coliseum . . . one of the country's largest indoor 
stadiums, seating 12,500 for sports attractions and more for stage events. 

Erdahl-Cloyd Union . . . one of the nation's most modern student-faculty 
activities centers. 

McKimmon Village ... a 300-unit married student housing center. 

Services 

State College serves the people of North Carolina in six main ways. The 
citizenry is reached through: resident instruction, off-campus instruction 
in College Extension Division courses, off-campus Agricultural Extension 
Service demonstrations, special instruction in technical institutes, indus- 
trial and agricultural research— both basic and applied, and direct contact 
with the home by means of radio and television. 



Summary of Enrollmenf 



The enrollment at North Carolina State College for the 1961 fall semester 
totaled 7,117 students, 6,944 men and 173 women. 

Enrollment by Classification Enrollment by Schools 

Freshmen - 1961 Agriculture — 867 

Sophomores 1348 Design 351 

Juniors 1095 Education 577 

Seniors 1339 Engineering - — 3485 

5th Year Professionals 35 Forestry - 413 

Graduates 897 Physical Sciences and Applied 

Unclassified - 198 Mathematics . - -- 554 

Agricultural Institute 212 Textiles - -- 448 

Special and Auditors _— 32 General Studies (Auditors 

and Unclassified) — 151 

^ 7117 Graduate (Unclassified) 59 

Agricultural Institute — . 212 

7II7 



General Information 13 

Admission Requirements 

To be admitted to a regular session of North Carolina State College, an 
applicant must be ot good moral character and present evidence of accept- 
able preparation for work at the college level. Every applicant must com- 
plete an application form which may be obtained from: 

Director of Admissions 

Peele Hall 

North Carolina State 

Raleigh, North Carolina 
The completed form should be returned to the above address. Applica- 
tions for admission for both the fall and spring semesters will be considered 
as soon as they are received. The deadline for submitting fall semester 
applications is September 1; for the spring semester, January 1. A $10 fee 
should accompany all applications for admissions. This fee will be re- 
funded to those who are denied admission, or applied to the college fees 
of those who are cleared for admission and who subsequently register for 
the semester for which application was made. 



Admission to Freshman Standing 

To be admitted as a freshman, the applicant should be a graduate of an 
accredited high school. It is possible for graduates of non-accredited high 
schools and holders of high school equivalency certificates to have indi- 
vidual consideration for admission. Applicants must take the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board and have the 
scores submitted to the Office of Admissions. These scores, together with 
the high school record, will be considered in determining admissibility. 
The high school record should be submitted along with the application and 
must show at least 16 units of completed high school work which should be 
distributed as follows: 

4 units of English (see English paragraph below) 

2 units of algebra; 1 unit of geometry 
(see mathematics paragraph below) 

1 unit of United States history (see paragraph below) 

2 units of science 

The remainder of the 16 units will be accepted from other courses, ex- 
cept that not more than one unit will be accepted from activity courses 
such as physical education, music, band or military science. 

English 

Students who lack proficiency in English are advised to take a special non- 
credit course in English composition before taking the regular credit courses 
in English. This remedial work may be taken in summer school or by cor- 



14 The General Catalog 

respondence before the first regular semester. Such students usually are in- 
vited to come to the College for counseling and further testing to help plan 
their preparatory Avork. Students with high scores on the verbal section 
of the Scholastic Aptitude Test are invited to participate in an accelerated 
English program. Foreign students lacking a satisfactory command of Eng- 
lish are required to take courses in English for foreign students until they 
are sufficiently familiar with the language to proceed with regular courses 
in English. 

Mathematics 

The entrance requirements in mathematics for all curricula include two 
units of algebra and one unit of geometry— preferably a unified course cover- 
ing concepts in both plane and solid geometry. 

Students entering in Agricultural Engineering, Mathematics Education, 
and the Schools of Design, Engineering, and Physical Sciences and Applied 
Mathematics are urged to present four units of college preparatory mathe- 
matics which should include advanced algebra and trigonometry. Students 
entering these curricula without this four-unit sequence in college prepara- 
tory mathematics may be delayed in their regular progress. 

Foreign Language 

Students entering either the liberal science or liberal arts degree pro- 
grams in the School of Liberal Arts are urged to present two units in a 
single modern foreign language (Spanish, French, German, or Russian). 
Failure to present these units may delay the student's program in these 
curricula. 

History 

Students may make up a deficiency in United States history after enroll- 
ment and receive college credit for the course. Foreign students are re- 
quired to complete a course in United States history before graduation. 

Applicants with at least three years of high school work who present 
satisfactory scores on the regular Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College 
Entrance Examination Board and a satisfactory rank in class may be ad- 
mitted, subject to the completion of the course requirements stated above 
and any other requirements for high school graduation. 

Applicants from other states of the United States must meet the preced- 
ing requirements and, in addition, must be recommended by the school 
in which enrollment is sought. 

Applicants from foreign countries are not required to take the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test. The previous school records of foreign students provide 
the primary basis for their admission. In addition, a foreign student must 
show proficiency in the English language and submit a statement of financial 
responsibility. 



General Information 15 

Admission of Transfer Students 

Transfer students with less than 29 semester hours of transfer credit 
must meet the admissions criteria for entering freshmen as outlined above. 
To be admitted as a nonfreshman transfer student, the applicant must 
have acquired at least 29 semester hours of college work, (the equivalent of 
sophomore standing) at an accredited institution. The applications of 
transfer students from non-accredited institutions ^\ill be re\ iewed by the 
Admissions Committee. 

All applicants for transfer must have an overall "C" average on work 
taken at other institutions and must be eligible to return to the last institu- 
tion regularly attended. Students whose records show below "C" average 
work cannot be admitted unless such admission is approved by the Ad- 
missions Committee. 

If the prospective transfer student's record shows an overall '"C" average 
or better, it will be evaluated by the dean or director of instruction of the 
school in which the student wishes to enroll. A ^2.00 transcript evaluation 
fee, payable to North Carolina State College, is charged for this service. 
Evaluation by the school will be final. No previously earned credit can be 
disregarded in evaluating a student's record. 

Students eligible to continue at other units of the Consolidated Univer- 
sity may transfer even though they do not have an overall "C" average. 
Students transferring between units of the Consolidated University will 
receive credit and honor points for all courses taken at the former unit. 

All transfer students must have official transcripts sent to the Office of 
Admissions directly from each other college attended. Failure of the 
student to submit a transcript from all colleges previously attended may 
result in his dismissal. 



Admission of Unclassified Students 

An unclassified student is one who is earning college credit but is not 
working toward a degree at North Carolina State College. Admission of 
an unclassified student requires the recommendation of the dean of the 
school in which the student wishes to enroll. Unclassified students must 
meet the same admissions requirements as regular students. If, at a later 
date, an unclassified student wishes to change to regular status, his credits 
must be evaluated for his major. Credits earned by the student while he 
is unclassified will be accepted only if he has completed the proper prere- 
quisites. Where credit is allowed, the student will receive the grades he 
earned in the courses accepted. 



16 The General Catalog 

Admission of Special Students 

Admission to the College in this category requires the recommendation 
of the dean of the school concerned. The usual college admission require- 
ments may be waived for mature students, but regular rules of scholarship 
will apply after admission. If special students wish to change to regular 
status at a later date they must meet the same admission requirements as 
regular students. The special student may not represent the College in any 
intercollegiate contest or become a member of any fraternity— professional 
or social. 



Admission as an Auditor 

Admission as an auditor requires the permission of the instructor and 
the department head. The participation of auditors in class discussion or 
in tests or examinations is optional with the instructor. Auditors receive 
no college credit; they are expected, however, to attend classes regularly. 



Readmission of Former North Carolina 
State Students 

To be readmitted after having withdrawn from the College or having 
been out of school for one or more semesters, the student must be academ- 
ically eligible to return and should apply to the Office of Admissions and 
Registration for readmission at least 30 days prior to the date of desired 
enrollment. 



Admission of Graduate Students 

All students working toward advanced degrees are enrolled in the Grad 
uate School. Procedures and policies governing graduate admission arr 
outlined in a special catalog issued by the Graduate School. Any student 
interested in enrolling for graduate study may obtain a copy of the Grad 
uate School Catalog from: 

Dean of the Graduate School 
Peele Hall 
North Carolina State 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



General Information 17 

Grades and Scholarship 

Grading System 

North Carolina State College operates on a credit-point system. Semestet 
credits represent the number of hours completed with a passing grade; 
quality points are determined by the grade earned. 

A Excellent 4 quality points for each credit hour. 

B Good 3 quality points for each credit hour 

C Average 2 quality points for each credit houi. 

D Passing 1 quality point for each credit hour. 

F, FA, FD Failing quality point for each credit hour. 

AU Audit credit hours and quality points 

AB Absent from 
examination 

IN Incomplete 

S Satisfactory (for graduate students) 

U Unsatisfactory (for graduate students) 

P Passed (for graduate students) 

D* Failure removed by re-examination (for seniors only) 

H Indicates work of outstanding quality (for Chapel Hill gradunit^ 
students) 

P Indicates clearly satisfactory work (for Chapel Hill graduate stu- 
dents) 

L Indicates low passing work (for Chapel Hill graduate students) 

Explanations 

At the discretion of the teacher, a student who has at least a C average 
in a course may be given an "Incomplete" grade for work not completed 
because of a serious interruption in his work, not caused by the student's 
own negligence. An incomplete must be made up during the next semes- 
ter the student is in residence, unless the department involved is not able 
to allow the make-up. In the latter case, the department will notify the 
student and the Office of Registration when the incomplete must be made 
up. Any incomplete not removed during the period specified by the de- 
partment will automatically become a failure and will be recorded as "Fi". 

A grade of "Fa" is recorded for an unexcused absence from the final 
examination. If an absence from examination is excused, the student must 
arrange to take the examination during the next semester he is in residence 
or a grade of "Fa" will be recorded. 

A grade of "Fd" is posted if a student has unofficially dropped a course 
for which he has been scheduled, or if he has officially dropped the course 
after the final date for dropping courses without failure. A failure may 
be made up only by repeating the subject. Such a repeat course must be 
regularly scheduled on the student's roster. 



18 The General Catalog 

Any student who fails a course within two semesters of graduation, and 
who fails only one course during that semester, may apply to the Office of 
Registration for permission to remove that failure by standing a re-exami- 
nation on the total subject matter of the course. If a senior fails more 
than one course during the next to the last semester and removes all but 
one of these deficiencies by repeating the course or courses, and if he has 
not had another re-examination, he may apply at the end of his last semes- 
ter in residence for permission to take a re-examination. When such a 
re-examination is taken to remove an "F", only the re-examination grade 
will be counted. A senior who has passed a re-examination will have his 
grade for this course changed from "F" to D*, which is equivalent in 
quality points to a grade of "D". A fee of |5.00 will be charged for ad- 
ministering such a re-examination. 

Course Repeat Rule 

Any undergraduate student will be permitted to substitute the second 
grade made on any course for the first grade earned on that course, until 
he has repeated a total of 15 hours of course work. If a course is taken a 
third time, both the second and third grades will be counted. In computing 
the cumulative scholastic average for a student who has repeated a course 
(within the 15-hour and one-repeat-per-course limitations) , the hours and 
quality points earned the first time will be omitted from the computation 
and only the second earned grade, whether an F or higher, will count. 



Scholarship Standords 

Semester Rule 

Any student carrying 14 or more semester hours must pass at least 6 
hours of work during the first semester in which he is registered at State 
College, and 8 hours each semester thereafter. A student carrying less 
than 14 hours must pass at least half of the work rostered in order to con- 
tinue. 

1.5 and 2.0 Average Rule 

Students who have earned 40 or more semester hours of college credit 
are expected to maintain a 2.0 quality point average. Students who have 
fewer than 40 semester hours are expected to maintain a 1.5 quality point 
average. Any student who fails to meet these standards will be placed on 
provisional status. Students will enter provisional status at the start of 
either the fall or spring semester. Any student on provisional status who 
fails to meet scholarship standards within two semesters and included 
summer sessions will be suspended. 

A student in the School of Engineering must have earned a minimum 



General Information 19 

grade of "C" on MA 102 to be eligible to roster courses taught by the School 
of Engineering above the freshman level. 

Graduotion Requirements 

A student is scholastically eligible for graduation when he has satisfied 
all the specific requirements of his department, his school, and the College, 
and has earned at least a cumulative 2.0 average. 

Students who have satisfactorily completed the requirements for more 
than one bachelor's degree may, upon the recommendation of their deans 
and payment of a double diploma fee, be awarded two bachelor's degrees 
at the same or at different commencement exercises. 

To be graduated with high honors, a student must have attained a 3.5 
quality point average on all semester hours of work taken at this institution 
(or at one or both of the other units of the University of North Carolina). 

To be graduated with honors, a student must have attained a 3.0 quality 
point average on all semester hours of work taken at this institution (or at 
one or both of the other units of the University of North Carolina). 

Residence Requirement 

A candidate for the bachelor's degree who transfers from some other 
institution must spend at least one academic year in residence and earn a 
minimum of 24 semester hours of credit before being eligible for a degree. 
Residence at either of the other two units of the University of North 
Carolina satisfies the residence requirement at this institution. 

Classification Requirements 

Students progress from one class to a higher class after they have com- 
pleted the required number of hours for the next classification. At the 
present time students are classified at the beginning of the fall semester 
and at no other time. The required number of hours for each classification 
is as follows: 

Freshman 1-28 semester hours of earned credit 

Sophomore 29-62 semester hours of earned credit 

Junior 63-96 semester hours of earned credit 

Senior 97 or more semester hours of earned 

credit 
Professional (School of Design) 140 or more semester hours 



20 The General Catalog 

General Policies 

Grades and Residence af Other Units 
of The University of North Carolina 

For courses transferred from other units of the Consolidated University, the 
student receives full credit and the same number of quality points he would 
have received if the same grades had been made on these courses at North 
Carolina State. Residence is also interchangeable. 

Required Freshman English and 
Required Physical Education 

Each student is expected to schedule the required course in freshman 
English and the required freshman and sophomore courses in physical 
education every semester until these courses are passed satisfactorily. 

Withdrawals from the College 

Students who wish to leave college during a semester or summer session 
must withdraw officially. There is no penalty if a student withdraws prior 
to the date specified in the college calendar as the last date for withdrawing 
without failures. Failures are recorded on all courses for students who 
withdraw after that date. A student who wishes to withdraw should re- 
port to the Counseling Center in Peele Hall to initiate the official with- 
drawal process. A student completing a semester or summer session, and 
not planning to return, need not officially withdraw. 

Changes in Curricula 

Students may change from one curriculum to another by filing with 
the Office of Registration (at the time of registration) a curriculum change 
card signed by the dean or director of instruction concerned. Such changes 
are effective only at the beginning of a semester or summer session. 

Scholastic Loads 

A student may not carry more than 21 semester hours or less than 12 
semester hours during a regular semester, without securing the written 
approval of the dean or director of instruction of his school. For a six- 
week summer session, a student must have the same approval if he carries 
more than seven semester hours. Veterans or other students receiving fed- 
eral educational benefits must meet the work load requirements of the 
appropriate federal agency. 



General Information 21 

Opporfunities for Superior Students 

Since it has often been found that gifted students do their best work 
when confronted with programs adapted to their abilities, North Carolina 
State College offers challenging opportunities to such individuals through 
superior student programs in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and English; 
honors programs for upperclassmen in engineering, physical sciences and 
applied mathematics, forestry, and agriculture; and a program in under- 
graduate research participation. The College also allows well-prepared 
students to seek advanced placement by means of qualifying examinations. 
A brochure describing these programs may be obtained by writing to the 
director of admissions. 



Residence Status for Tuition Payment 

The tuition charge for legal residents of North Carolina is less than for 
nonresidents. A legal resident of North Carolina is one who has his domi- 
cile in this State. It is important that each applicant for admission and each 
enrolled student know his residence status for tuition payment and un- 
derstand the regulations governing residence status. The following regu- 
lations cover most factual situations: 

1. A person 21 years of age or older is not deemed eligible for the 
lower tuition rate unless he has maintained his legal residence in North 
Carolina for at least the six months next preceding the date of his first 
enrollment in an institution of higher education in this State. 

2. The legal residence of a person under 21 years of age at the time 
of his first enrollment in an institution of higher education in this State 
is that of his parents, surviving parent, or legal guardian. In cases where 
parents are divorced or legally separated, the legal residence of the father 
will control unless custody of the minor has been awarded by court order 
to the mother or to a legal guardian other than a parent. No claim of 
residence in North Carolina based upon residence of a guardian in North 
Carolina will be considered if either parent is still living unless the action 
of the court appointing the guardian antedates the student's first enroll- 
ment in a North Carolina institution of higher education by at least 12 
months. 

3. The residence status of any student is determined as of the time 
of his first enrollment in an institution of higher education in North Car- 
olina and may not thereafter be changed except: (a) in the case of a non- 
resident minor student at the time of his first enrollment whose parents 
have subsequently established legal residence in North Carolina; and (b) 
in the case of a resident who abandons his legal residence in North Caro- 
lina. In either case, the appropriate tuition rate will become effective at 
the beginning of the semester or term next following the date of change 
of residence status. 

4. The legal residence of a wife follows that of her husband, except 



22 



The General Catalog 



that a woman student currently enrolled in this institution as a resident 
may continue as a resident even though she marry a nonresident. 

5. Military personnel attached to military posts or reservations in North 
Carolina are not considered eligible for the lower tuition rate unless they 
have maintained a legal residence in the State for at least the six months 
next preceding the date of first enrollment in an institution of higher 
education in the State. 

6. Aliens lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent resi- 
dence who have established a legal residence in North Carolina according 
to Paragraphs number 1, 2, or 4, above, are eligible for the lower tuition 
rate. 

7. Ownership of property in or payment of taxes to the State of North 
Carolina apart from legal residence will not qualify one for the lower 
tuition rate. 

8. Discretion to adjust individual cases within the spirit of these regula- 
tions is lodged in the vice president and finance officer of the University. 

Any student or prospective student in doubt concerning his residence 
status must bear the responsibility for securing a ruling by stating his case 
in writing to the director of admissions. 



Tuition and Fees 

Charges for tuition and fees vary according to (1) the student's status as a 
resident or non-resident of North Carolina; (2) type of student (regular 
undergraduate, special or unclassified undergraduate, auditor or graduate 
student); and (3) to a minor degree, the curriculum in which the student 
is enrolled. 

An application for admission must be accompanied by an application 
fee of $10. This fee is refunded to students whose applications are denied. 
It is forfeited by applicants who are accepted but who do not enroll. 

Tuition and fees are payable during the registration period. All charges 
are subject to change without notice, but the charges in effect currently 
are as follows: 

Regular Undergraduate Students 









Out- 


of-State 


Schools 


In-State 


Students 


Students 




Fall 


spring 


Fall 


Spring 




Semester 


Semester 


Semester 


Semester 


Agriculture 


$162.50 


.15156.50 


$375.00 


$369.00 


Design 


162.50 


1.56.50 


375.00 


369.00 


Education 


162. .50 


156. ,50 


375.00 


369.00 


EnginccMing 


162.50 


156.50 


375.00 


369.00 


Forestry 


172.50 


156.50* 


385.00 


369.00* 


Liberal Arts 


162. .50 


1.56. .50 


375.00 


369.00 


Physical Sciences and 










Applied Mathematics 


162 ..50 


156. .50 


375.00 


369.00 


Textiles 


162 ..50 


156.50 


375.00 


369.00 



Add $10.00 if not registtred in fall semester. 



General Information 23 

Late Registrat-ion 

Registration schedules are set for specific days, and certain definite pro- 
cedures are outlined. A student has not completed registration until all 
of the required steps are taken. All students, graduate and undergraduate, 
who fail to register on dates scheduled must pay a $5.00 late registration 
fee. 

Undergraduat-e Sfudenf-s Taking Less 
Than Seven Hours 

Undergraduate students taking one course of not more than four hours 
during a regular semester will be charged one-fourth tuition, one-fourth 
academic fees and no non-academic fees. These students will not be 
entitled to any of the services and privileges provided by the non-academic 
fees. Undergraduate students taking five or six hours during a regular 
semester will be charged one-half tuition, one-half academic fees and all 
non-academic fees. All other imdergraduate students will pay full tuition 
and fees. 

Audits 

Subject to academic regulations, regularly enrolled graduate or under- 
graduate students may audit courses by registering for them. The first 
audit will be disregarded in determination of course load on which tuition 
and fee payments are based, but any additional audits are to be added to 
the course load at full credit hour value. Students registered for audits only 
will pay the rates applicable to special unclassified students. 

Unclassified Students 

A student registering for course work as an unclassified student but 

requesting graduate credit will be charged the regular graduate student 
rate. 

Graduate Students 

Applicants interested in graduate work may receive a schedule of fees 
upon application to the Graduate School. 

Commencement Fee 

A fee of 19.00, covering cost of diploma and rental of cap and gown, is 
charged candidates for the baccalaureate degree during the last semester 
before the degree is awarded. 



24 The General Catalog 

Deposits 

(a) As partial security for library books, laboratory equipment, etc., 
a general deposit of $20 must be paid by regularly enrolled undergraduate 
and graduate students at the time of their first enrollment (see also under 
"Refunds") . 

(b) Certain departments are allowed to collect small deposits, in addi-. 
tion to the general deposit referred to above, for such things as lockers, etc. 
In such instances departmental regulations will apply. 

Professional Students in Engineering 

Students in the various fifth-year professional curricula will be charged 
on the same basis as undergraduate students. 

Thesis Preparation 

Graduate students who have completed course requirements and are in 
residence for thesis work only will be charged $15 per semester for tuition, 
plus all fees. Graduate students not in residence who have completed all 
requirements for the degree sought, except for the thesis, will be required 
to register for the term in which final requirements for the degree are to 
be completed and pay a tuition fee of $15 and a $7.00 registration fee. 

Degree Only 

Graduate students who have completed all requirements for the degree 
sought are required to register for the term in which the degree will be 
awarded and pay a tuition fee of $10. 



Room Rent 

Rooms in the College dormitories rent for $100 per person per semester. 
Dormitory room applications are for the period of a school year and the 
rent is payable in advance prior to the beginning of each semester as an- 
nounced. When a new student is accepted by the College, he is sent a letter 
of clearance together with a dormitory room reservation request form. If 
he wishes to reserve a dormitory room, he should fill out the reservation 
request and return it with his remittance. Rooms will be assigned as long 
as space is available, in the order in which payment of rent is received. 
Individual preferences as to location of room and/or choice of roommate 
will be complied with as far as possible. All reservations are subject to pub- 
lished dormitory rules and regulations. 

Male freshman students are required to live in the College dormitories 
unless they are married, veterans, or living with parents or relatives. Each 
of these freshmen must make a written application to the director of stu- 
dent housing for permission to live outside of the dormitories. 



General Information 25 

Married Student Housing 

College-owned apartments for married students rent for the following 
amounts: 

Efficiency apartment $43.00 per month 

One-bedroom apartment 57.50 per month 

Two-bedroom apartment 69.00 per month 

Linen Rental Service 

Linen Rental Service is available upon request at the rate of $10 per 
semester, and includes a weekly issue of two sheets, one pillow case, and 
three bath towels. Students living in dormitories may submit their appli- 
cation along with remittance at the time of room rent payment. Students 
living off campus may make application at the Business Office in Holla- 
day Hall or at the College Laundry. 



Boord 

Meals are served cafeteria style, and the cost depends upon the individ- 
ual student. Average cost is approximately $550 per year. 

Books and Supplies 

The cost for books and supplies is variable, depending upon the cur- 
riculum in which the student is enrolled. A reasonable estimate is $100 per 
year, but students who have to buy drawing supplies and slide rules have 
an additional original outlay. All books and supplies are paid for in cash 
as purchased. 

Estimated Annual Cost 

(Items such as tuition, fees, and room rent in dormitories are fixed costs. 
Other items are variable with the individual student.) 



Tuition 


First Semester 


Second Semester 


Year 


(Non-resident students 








add $212.50 per semester) 


$ 87.50 


% 87.50 


% 175.00 


Other college fees 


7,-. .00 


69.00 


144.00 


General deposit (paid only 








upon first enrollment) 


20.00 




20.00 






Dormitorv room 


100.00 


100.00 


200.00 


Linen service (optional) 


10.00 


10.00 


20.00 


Board 


250.00-300.00 


250.00-300.00 


,")00.00-600.00 


Books and supplies 


50.00-100.00 


25.00 


75.00-125.00 


Other personal expenses and 








incidentals 


100.00-150.00 


100.00-150.00 


200.00-300.00 


Total (N. C. residents) 


S692.50-842.50 


S64 1.50- 74 1.50 


51334.00-1584.00 


Total (non-residents) 


S905.00-1055.00 


S854.0O-954.0O 


SI 759 .00-2009 .00 



26 The General Catalog 

Refunds 

Tuition and Fees 

A student who withdraws from school on or before the last day for regis- 
tration will receive a refund of the full amount paid, less a $5.00 registra- 
tion fee. On withdrawal later than the period specified, no refund will be 
made. 

Room Rent 

Refund of room rent will be made if reservation is cancelled: 

a. Prior to the first day of the registration period, the rent paid will be 
refunded less a $10 reservation fee. 

b. During the registration period, the rent paid will be refunded less 
a $10 reservation fee or a charge of $1.00 per day (whichever amount is 
greater) from the first day of the registration period (or date of reserva- 
tion, whichever is later) to date of cancellation. 

c. After the last day for registration, no refund will be made for any 
reason other than withdrawal from college. 

Cancellation of reservations must be made in person or in writing to: 

Housing Rental Office 
Leazar Hall 
North Carolina State 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Linen Rentol 

No refunds or credits will be made to a student for those weeks he fails 
to use the linen rental service. The exception to this case is the student who 
officially withdraws from college. He will be refunded for the unused 
service at the rate of fifty cents (.50) per week provided he returns the final 
issue of linen to the College Laundry. 

General Deposit 

Miscellaneous charges for laboratory breakage, traffic fines, dormitory and 
property repair charges, military property charges, physical education equip- 
ment and property charges, and all other miscellaneous charges when less 
than $15 will be deducted from the general deposit of $20, as incurred 
throughout the year. The $20 general deposit must be rebuilt to the 
$20 level by the student at the beginning of the fall semester before the 
completion of registration or whenever the deposit has been depleted to the 
$5.00 level. 

The general deposit of $20 or the remaining balance is refunded when 
a student has completed the requirements for a degree or has dropped out 
of school permanently. The student must apply to the Business Office for 
the refund at which time a correct mailing address must be given. Refund 



General Information 27 

will be made by check after 30 days from the date the application is 
received. 

Refund Committee 

In some instances circumstances justify the waiving of rules regarding 
refunds. An example might be withdrawal from school because of illness. 
Students have the privilege of appeal to the Refund Committee when they 
feel that special consideration is merited. Applications for such appeals 
may be secured from the Division of Student Affairs. 



Sfudent Activities and Services 

State College makes every effort to provide the student with surroundings 
which are pleasant and conducive to intellectual growth. Respecting the 
student as an individual, the College assures him the maximum of per- 
sonal liberty within the limits necessary for orderly progression of class 
work. In return, he is expected to pay serious attention to his purpose in 
attending college and to observe rules of conduct consistent with maturity. 
Through the various services and activities identified with everyday life 
on the campus, as well as through the several extracurricular organizations 
and functions, the student at State College has an excellent opportunity 
for acquiring experience in group leadership and community living which 
may serve him well in his professional career. 

As the student progresses in his development, especially after his fresh- 
man year, he Avill find many opportunities to increase his growth in citizen- 
ship by participating in the activities of his academic class and of the stu- 
dent body in general. Following is a survey of the various activities at 
State College. 



Student Government and Honor System 

When a student enters State College, he becomes a member of a self- 
governing community. 

Legislative, executive, and judicial authority, insofar as student affairs 
are concerned, rest with the Student Government which operates within 
the framework of over-all college administration. The Student Govern- 
ment members and Judicial Department members are elected in campus- 
wide elections. The student has a voice in his own government by partici- 
pating in these elections. Often in general elections he is asked to vote on 
proposed changes in regulations which affect the student body. 

The student also becomes part of the Honor System. He is expected to 
adhere to its general aims, which are honesty in class work and honor in 
general conduct. 



28 The General Catalog 

Clubs ond Societies 

Through the various honorary, professional, technical, and social organi- 
zations at State College, the interested student finds many opportunities 
to participate in activities that appeal to him and to meet others who have 
similar interests. 

College Honorary 

Honorary societies and fraternities at State College are Golden Chain, 
senior leadership; Blue Key, junior leadership; Thirty and Three, sopho- 
more leadership; Phi Eta Sigma, freshman scholarship; and Phi Kappa 
Phi, junior, senior, and graduate student scholarship. 

Professional and Technical 

Each school at State College sponsors or supervises a large number of 
professional and technical societies and clubs. Students in every area of 
instruction are encouraged to join with their fellow students in pursuing 
their common interests. Many of these organizations contribute greatly to 
the student's professional and social growth. 

Social Fraternities 

Eighteen national social fraternities have chapters at State College. Each 
sends two representatives to the Interfraternity Council, which has as its 
objectives promoting the general interests and welfare of the associated 
fraternities and insuring cooperation between them in their relations with 
the faculty, the student body, and the general public. 

The social fraternities are Alpha Gamma Rho, Delta Sigma Phi, Farm- 
house, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Epsilon Pi, 
Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 
Sigma Alpha Mu, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Sigma Pi, 
Tau Kappa Epsilon, and Theta Chi. 

State College has one national social sorority, Sigma Kappa, which re- 
cently established a chapter here. 



Student- Publications 

A variety of publications, both general and school-sponsored, are edited 
and managed by student officers, with faculty members serving as advisers. 
A student may gain journalistic experience and training in writing, edit- 
ing, or management by working on these publications. 

The three general publications. The Agromeck, The Student Broadcast- 
ing System, and The Technician, are supported in large part by a publi- 
cation fee which is a part of each student's fees. 



Gener.\l Information 29 

The Agromeck 

The Agromeck is the college yearbook, providing a record of the classes 
and of the principal events of the school year. The yearbook recalls in 
pictures the varied activities of the student body throughout the year, and 
is published for the entire student body. 

The Technician 

The Technician is a student newspaper, issued three times a week and 
delivered to the dormitories and fraternity houses. Students living off- 
campus pick up their copies of the newspaper from special Technician 
boxes located at Watauga Hall, the Coliseum, and at the main desk in the 
College Union. The Technician serves as a forum for student expression 
as well as a medium for news of particular interest to State College students. 

The Student Broadcasting System 

Although it is not a publication in the strictest sense of the word, The 
Student Broadcasting System, a carrier-current station with coverage 
limited to the campus, ser\-es the same function through a different me- 
dium. It offers many opportunities for extra-curricular training in actual 
broadcasting techniques as well as training in administration and program 
planning. 

The Tower 

Each student receives a copy of The Tower, the college handbook, which 
contains detailed information about student regulations, organizations, and 
activities. 

Other Publications 

Several of the schools have their own publications which are published 
under the general supervision of the particular school and deal with ma- 
terial of special interest to students in that school. These publications in- 
clude The Pi-ne-tum, published by the School of Forestry; The Southern 
Engineer, published by the School of Engineering; The Textile Forum, 
published by the School of Textiles; and The Publications of the School 
of Design. 

Athletics 

In addition to voluntary programs of intramural and intercollegiate 
sports. State College requires freshmen and sophomores to enroll in credit 
courses in physical education. Juniors and seniors may take physical edu- 
cation as an elective. 

Intramural 

The College maintains an extensive program of intramural sports which 
is administered by the Department of Physical Education. Participation in 



30 The General Catalog 

these sports is purely voluntary and college credit is not given. Competi- 
tion is divided into three divisions: Dormitory, Fraternity, and Open. 
Thirteen sports are offered in the dormitory and fraternity divisions, and 
four sports plus special events in the open division. 

Sports offered in the intramural program are correlated with those 
taught in the required programs of physical education. Instruction in these 
sports is given in the classes and opportunity for competition is provided 
in the intramural program. An Intramural Advisory Board, composed of 
student representatives and one physical education staff member, deter- 
mines the policies to be administered by the intramural director. 

The intramural facilities, both indoor and outdoor, are excellent. The 
intramural playing fields, adjacent to the gymnasium, provide space 
for 10 Softball or 10 football games to be played simultaneously. Twenty 
tennis courts are available for tennis and construction of additional courts 
is being considered. 

The gymnasium has 10 four- wall handball courts, six squash courts, 
and separate rooms for boxing, wrestling, golf, correctives and weight- 
lifting. The main gymnasium floor provides seven basketball courts which 
may be adjusted to accommodate eight volleyball courts, 20 badminton 
courts, indoor tennis and various other sports. This space also includes a 
gymnastic area greater than the size of a regulation basketball court. 

The swimming pool, located in an adjoining building, is 25 meters by 
25 yards and has two one-meter and one three-meter diving boards. 

Intercollegiate 

Intercollegiate athletics at State College come under the supervision of 
a separate department of the College. Policies governing intercollegiate 
competition are recommended, however, by the Athletic Council which 
is composed of faculty, students, and alumni. The policies are in full ac- 
cord with the Atlantic Coast Conference and N. C. A. A. rules of eligibility 
for intercollegiate contests. Membership of the Atlantic Coast Conference 
includes— in addition to State College— Duke University, Wake Forest Col- 
lege, the University of North Carolina, the University of Maryland, Clem- 
son College, the University of South Carolina, and the University of 
Virginia. 

The program in intercollegiate athletics consists of the organization and 
training of "Wolfpack" teams in football, basketball, baseball, track cross- 
country, wrestling, swimming, tennis, golf, soccer, and rifle competition. 

Facilities for intercollegiate athletics at State College include Riddick 
Stadium, a 20,000-seat stadium for football; William Neal Reynolds Coli- 
seum, a 12,500-seat arena for basketball; football practice fields; tennis 
courts; a swimming pool of Olympic dimensions; a gymnasium; a baseball 
field, and facilities in the Coliseum for wrestling and other sports. 



General Information 31 

Music 

Since the early days of North Carolina State College, its musical organi- 
zations have played an important part in the life of the campus. These 
groups present concerts, furnish music for official college functions, and 
perform at athletic events. Rehearsal schedules have been carefully ar- 
ranged to avoid conflicts with other classes or with study time. The com- 
bined membership of these organizations constitutes the largest voluntary 
student organization on campus. 

The Men's Glee Club 

The Men's Glee Club performs several concerts each year, both on and 
off the campus. In addition to these concerts, this group makes appearances 
on television and radio. The Club makes tours and provides small ensemble 
music for special occasions. 

Bonds 

The Symphonic Band, the Fanfare Band, the Marching Band, and the 
ROTC Band make up the four divisions of the North Carolina State Bands. 
Each band serves a specific purpose in the musical life on the campus. 
Assignments to the various bands are made according to the interests and 
ability of the individual student. 

The Symphonic and Fanfare Bands are concert organizations. Students 
who are unable to meet the rigid requirements for the Symphonic Band are 
eligible to try for the Fanfare Band. 

The Marching Band operates primarily during football season and is 
widely known for its spectacular half-time performances. 

The ROTC Band consists of freshman and sophomore ROTC and 
AFROTC students. Participation in band excuses the student from all 
ROTC drill on the field. 

Additional information concerning musical activities may be obtained 
by writing or visiting the director of music in Pullen Hall. 

Student Centers 

Two important centers for the extra-curricular activities of State College 
students are the E. S. King Religious Center and the Erdahl-Cloyd 
College Union. 

College Union 

The Erdahl-Cloyd College Union Building is not only the center for an 
extensive social and cultural program, but also provides facilities for recre- 
ation and relaxation. In addition to a snack bar, dining room, barber shop, 
and ballroom, there are meeting rooms, a library and lounge area, a gallery 
area for exhibits, a darkroom, craft shop, music listening room, guest 



32 The General Catalog 

rooms, a games room and a theater. The offices of the College Union and 
other organizations are located on the second floor. 

The purpose of the College Union is to provide a facility and a pro- 
gram which will complement the academic life of the student and offer 
him an opportunity to further already existing interests and to develop 
new ones. Many of the programs at the College Union are organized and 
executed by students. Everyone is encouraged to participate in some aspect 
of the Union's activities. 

Religious Center 

In addition to the functions and activities held in the College Union 
Building, many other activities— especially those of a religious, spiritual, 
and devotional nature— are held within the E. S. King Religious Center. 
The Center has an attractive lobby equipped with writing and reading 
tables and chairs, a television room, and four conference rooms where 
student and faculty groups may meet. The coordinator of religious affairs 
and several denominational chaplains have their offices in this building. 

The Danforth Chapel, located in the Center, provides a place for reli- 
gious services and meditation for students of all faiths. 

The E. S. King Religious Center plans social events and lectures on 
various topics related to stiident life in addition to, or in connection with, 
its programs of religious emphasis. 



D. H. Hill Library 

The College's modern and well-equipped D. H. Hill Library has shelves 
for 400,000 volumes, seats for 900 readers, private studies and conference 
rooms, and well-lighted ventilated reading rooms. The Library's book 
stacks provide ample space for the fast-growing book collection. In addi- 
tion, facilities for photoprinting and microfilming are available, and the 
building's service and reading areas are used as a working center for both 
students and faculty. 

The book collection, which is primarily scientific and technological, 
strongly reflects the teaching and research requirements of State College. 
There is also available a fine and well-selected collection of books and 
materials on every phase of cultural interest as well as for recreational 
reading. At the present time the collection exceeds 240,000 volumes. More 
than 3,300 journals are received currently, and more than 3,000,000 docu- 
ments are held resulting from the depository status which the College 
Library holds for publications of the Federal Government. 

Books for recreational reading arc housed in the lobby of the building. 
Students may explore this area and check out books. The big well-lighted 
West Reading Room is an invitation to study. In addition to this room, 
on the top floor is a special smaller study open to the students who prefer 
to work in a more secluded place. 

For the graduate studeiits there are desks and prixate lockers in the 



General Information 33 

stacks and adjoining the ground floor stacks, a large room where faculty 
members and graduate students may work. In addition to these facilities, 
there are several conference rooms open to any college groups requesting 
them, and rooms ^vhich can be temporarily assigned. 

In addition to the D, H. Hill Library, specialized branch libraries are 
maintained in the Schools of Textiles and Design. 

Housing 

At State College, the dormitory is considered something more than 
merely a suitable place for lining and studying. A well-organized dormitory 
program plays an important role in the student's all-around development. 
Under the program each dormitory is organized mu^h like a club, with 
officers elected by the residents and paid student counselors. 

Each student is encouraged to participate in the athletic, social, and 
recreational activities of his dormitory and in this way he has an oppor- 
tunity to meet and make friends with students of varied backgiounds, to 
use his leisure time pleasantly and profitably, and to grow in personality. 
Each dormitory elects its representatives to the Interdormitory Council, a 
student organization which coordinates interdormitory activities and pro- 
grams. In each of seven major dormitories, faculty couples occupy apart- 
ments and act as hosts. They assist the occupants with their problems and 
provide a pleasant atmosphere in which the parents and friends of the 
occupants may visit the dormitory. 

The College has no dormitory for women students. They must make 
their own housing arrangements. A list of available off-campus rooms for 
rent is maintained at the Housing Rental Office in Leazar Hall. 

For married students, the College has for rent 300 permanent efficiency, 
one and two bedroom apartments. Priority for occupancy goes to graduate 
students first, prior military servicemen eligible for government educa- 
tional benefits second, and all other married students third. 

At the beginning of the 1961-62 academic year, approximately 327 stu- 
dents were housed in off-campus residences maintained by the social fra- 
ternities which have chapters at State College. Each chapter is represented 
in the Interfraternity Council which sponsors athletic events and social 
functions of particular interest to fraternity members. 

Dormitory Counseling 

Each of the dormitories at State College has a dormitory counselor who is 
an upperclassman with the qualifications for, and responsibility of, helping 
individual students in his dormitory— particularly freshmen— in any way 
that he can. Floor counselors and assistant floor counselors, chosen on the 
same basis, assist the dormitory counselor. Whenever these counselors cannot 
answer particular questions or give aid in solving special problems, they 
dircci the student to the administrative official who can. Also, in the 
larger dormitories, faculty couples are in residence to provide the influ- 
ence and assistance that such mature persons can give. 



34 The General Catalog 

Food Services 

The State College student does not have to travel far for food, ^vhether 
it is a full meal or a snack. 

Leazor Hall 

Leazar Hall, the main dining facility, provides four cafeteria lines where 
the student may secure nutritious food at reasonable prices. Meals are 
served cafeteria style and the cost depends upon the selection of food. A 
typical student may spend approximately S2.00 per day or S550 a year for 
meals, although some students may eat at the college cafeteria for as little 
as $1.25 per day or $300 a year. 

College Union and Shuttle Inn 

The College Union Building offers dining room facilities for groups, 
and also a snack bar. Shuttle Inn in the Textile Building serves sand- 
wiches and grill items. Shuttle Inn is operated by the Student Supply Store 
Store. 

Dormitory Snack Bars 

In addition, each dormitory area has its own snack bar, also operated by 
the Student Supply Store system. 



Laundry and Dry Cleaning 

The college laundry provides on-campus laundry and dry cleaning serv- 
ice on a cash-and-carry basis for both students and staflE. The rates are 
inexpensive. 



Linen Rental Plan 

This service provides for an initial issue of two sheets, one pillow case, 
three towels, and a complete change of linen each week during the school 
year. A student who elects to use this service need not purchase or bring 
these items with him when he enters school. The service is available to 
all students at a cost of $10 per semester. Applications for the linen rental 
plan are mailed with dormitory room forms, or they may be obtained from 
the Housing Rental Office. 



Barber Service 

Two barber shops are provided— one in the E. S. King Religious Center 
and one in the College Union. 



General Information 35 

Books and Supplies 

Student Supply Store 

State College's ultra-modern Student Supply Store, located on Dunn 
Avenue, houses an excellent book department, general student supplies, 
engineering equipment, and a fountain-snack bar. 

Book Exchange 

Alpha Zeta, student honor fraternity, maintains a book exchange in the 
College Union where students may exchange or sell used books. 



Health 

State College seeks to safeguard the health of the student in every way 
possible. The College maintains a 76-bed infirmary which is open 24 hours 
a day, with 15 staff members. There are college physicians, a supervising 
nurse, a night supervisor, six general duty nurses, one full-time laboratory 
and X-ray technician, and four other employees. Among the many valuable 
features of the infirmary are an up-to-date first aid department and X-ray 
department. 

The college physicians observe regular daily office hours in the infirmary 
in the mornings and afternoons. In addition, they visit the infirmary more 
often when necessary. A graduate nurse is on duty day and night. Students 
have free access to the infirmary at all times. 

In case of accident or serious illness of a student, parents or guardians 
will be notified immediately. No surgical operation will be performed 
without full consent of parents or guardians, except in cases of extreme 
emergency. 

The medical fee which each student pays provides for infirmary service, 
general medical treatment, and for the services of nurses. It does not 
provide for surgical operations, outside hospital care, or the services of 
dentists or other specialists. 

Before the student enters State College he should have a complete, 
thorough examination by his family physician. Any abnormality should 
be noted and all remedial defects corrected in order to prevent unneces- 
sary loss of time while the student is in college. If the examination is not 
made before he enters, the student will be given a physical examination 
at the College, for which a fee is charged. Blanks for the physical exami- 
nation may be secured from the Office of Admissions and Registration. 

The College offers annually a plan of student accident and health insur- 
ance. The insurance is planned to cover the surgical, accident and hospi- 
tal needs of the student, as a supplement to the services of the infirmary. 
Each year complete information will be made available to students before 
the opening of school. 



36 The General Catalog 



Foreign students are required to enroll in the sickness and accident 
insurance plan provided through the College or to have similar coverage 
under other insurance plans or arrangements with their sponsors. 



Orientation 

Several days before the registration of upperclassmen in the fall semes- 
ter, new students arrive on the campus for a series of activities planned 
during Orientation Week. To help freshmen with the transition from 
high school to college and to help new students become acquainted with 
the campus and with college regulations, the College arranges during 
this period a series of meetings and conferences with faculty and student 
leaders. 

Throughout the first semester, there are other activities designed to con- 
tinue orientation and to supplement orientation courses conducted by the 
individual schools. In addition, the individual schools provide for regular 
contact with faculty advisers in order that each student may have the op- 
portunity of discussing matters connected with his adjustment to college 
life. 



Counseling: Student Questions and Problems 

The main source of general information for students at State College is 
the Di\ision of Student Affairs ^vhich includes the various administrators 
handling admissions, registration, records, student activities, student hous- 
ing, orientation and counseling, and student financial aid. 

Academic 

Upon enrolling at State College, each student is assigned a faculty ad- 
viser, usually a member of the department in which the student is taking 
his major work. This faculty adviser works with the student in planning 
his program of studies and is available for other help in solving problems 
of an academic nature. The deans, directors of instruction, and depart- 
ment heads are also available to the student to help provide information 
about the different curricula and to assist with long-range curricular or 
career planning. Teachers of courses in which the student is enrolled are 
the best sources of help with particular subjects. Members of the teaching 
staff maintain a schedule of office hours and expect the student to consult 
them individually whenever special help is needed. 

Dormitory Counseling 

As described in the section on Housing, student dormitory counselors 
and floor counselors and the hosts and hostesses assigned to the larger 
dormitories, provide assistance with various questions and problems. 



General Information 37 

Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center has a staff of full-time counselors to help stu- 
dents with problems of vocational and curricular choice, and personal 
adjustment. The Center is prepared to administer various aptitude and 
interest tests and maintains a file of occupational information. Referral 
can be made for students desiring remedial work in speech, reading, and 
other special areas. 

Students may come to the Center on their own initiative or may be re- 
ferred by teachers, advisers, or other members of the college staff. There 
is no cost to the student for conferences but a small materials fee is 
charged when tests are administered. 

Placement 

Each of the degree-granting schools at State College provides its students 
with assistance in obtaining employment during summer vacations and 
upon graduation. In some curricula a period of approved summer work is 
required for graduation. 



Financial Aid 

Help in meeting college expenses is available to North Carolina State 
College students in several forms. Financial aid, other than graduate fel- 
lowships and assistantships, is administered by the Student Financial Aid 
Officer under policies set by the College Committee on Scholarships and 
Student Aid. Students seeking information or counseling on financial 
matters, or wishing to apply for assistance, should write or visit the Stu- 
dent Financial Aid Office. 

Scholarships, Grants-ln-Aid, Loons 

A student's single application for financial aid will gain consideration 
for all available scholarships, grants-in-aid, and long-term loans. In gen- 
eral, awards are approved in amounts proportionate to demonstrated need 
of students with satisfactory records of achievement and school citizenship. 
Entering freshmen also must make strong scores on the College Entrance 
Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude Test. 

The main means for providing financial aid to entering freshmen is the 
annual Talent For Service Scholarship Program. For the most complete 
consideration, high school seniors should submit application materials by 
February 1 of the year preceding fall enrollment. Enrolled students are 
encouraged to make application at the end of one school year for financial 
aid in the next year. There is, however, no deadline for applications, ex- 
cept in the cases of certain competitive scholarships wiiich are announced. 

The College seeks to assign the kind of aid best suited to the needs and 
qualifications of the applicant, and a recipient may expect a portion of 
the aid offered him each year to be in the form of a loan. Renewal of finan- 



38 The General Catalog 

cial aid is based upon the student's making a clearly satisfactory record of 
achievement and campus citizenship. 

State College participates in the National Defense Student Loan Pro- 
gram, under which loans are made that draw no interest until one year 
after leaving college. Other college loans accrue interest at the rate of 3 
per cent from the date of execution of the note. Repayments of long-term 
loans begin after graduation or withdrawal from college. 

Emergency loans are available to meet unforeseen expenses. These loans 
must be repaid in 30 to 60 days and are not extended beyond the end of 
a term. 



Graduate Fellowships 

Graduate Fellowships are funds offered to graduate students to assist in 
the support of programs of advanced study. Holders of fellowships have 
no obligations to the College and may devote full time to the prosecution 
of their graduate programs. Funds for these fellowships are provided by 
various government agencies, professional groups, and business organiza- 
tions. Applicants for fellowships should contact the head of the depart- 
ment in which they wish to pursue studies. 

Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate Assistantships are short-term staff appointments that carry 
stipends ranging from $1,200 to $4,800 depending upon the magnitude of 
the service obligation and the experience of the appointee. Teaching as- 
sistants are customarily appointed annually for the nine-month academic 
year. Research assistants are often appointed on a calendar year basis and, 
accordingly, stipends may be 20 per cent larger than those for teaching 
assistants. Only graduate students in good standing are eligible for appoint- 
ment to graduate assistantships. The course loads permitted graduate 
assistants are adjusted in proportion to the service obligation. Graduate 
assistants giving half-time to their service obligation may register for 60 
per cent of a full course load. 

Athletic Awards 

Athletic Awards are made upon the recommendation of the Athletic 
Department to athletes who meet the established qualifications for such 
awards. 



Part-time Employment 

A Part-time Employment Service is provided to assist students in locat- 
ing jobs both on and off campus. Students who desire part-time work 
should call at the Financial Aid Office when they arrive on the campus. 



iwKnr^r-f-f i 




""^^N^. 



t ■» 



4- »^ fi i'. I 




41 



MILITARY TRAINING 



Department of Military Science 

Professor of Military Science Colonel L. W. Merriam 
Assistant Professors of Military Science: 

Lieutenant Colonel Wilford L. Willey, Lieutenant Colonel James F. Barrett, Major 

Max a. Craig, Major Joseph W. Jenkins^ Major James E. Lawson Major Robert E. 

WicKHAM, Major Woodrow O. Wilson, Captain Norman G. Eriksen, Captain Charles 

I. McLain, Captain Maynard E. Shields 



Department of Air Science 

Professor of Air Science Colonel James D. Howder 

Assistant Professors of Air Science: 

Lieutenant Colonel Franklin D. Blanton, Lieutenant Colonel Earl R. Dickey, 
Lieutenant Colonel Maynard C. Cusworth, Major Gerald L. Waterman, Major 
Robert J. Sheldon, Captain Charles W. Rowan, Captain William S. Clarke, Jr. 



Objectives 



The Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) at State College designates 
those students enrolled for training in the Department of Military Science 
or in the Department of Air Science. These departments are integral 
academic and administrative subdivisions of the institution. The senior 
Army officer and the senior Air Force officer assigned to the College are 
designated as professor of military science (PMS) and professor of air sci- 
ence (PAS) . These senior officers are responsible to the Secretary of the 
Army, the Secretary of the Air Force, and the chancellor of the College for 
conducting their training and academic program in accordance with in- 
structions issued by the respective secretaries and as required by college 
regulations. Army officers who are assigned to the College as instructors in 
ROTC are called assistant professors of military science; Air Force officers, 
as assistant professors of Air Science. Non-commissioned officers of the 
Army are assigned as assistant instructors and administrative personnel. 



42 The General Catalog 

Non-commissioned officers of the Air Force are assigned as administrative 
and supply personnel. 

The Army ROTC, in four years of military training, produces junior 
officers who have the qualities and attributes essential to their progressive 
and continued development as officers of the United States Army. 

The mission of the Air Force ROTC is to develop in selected college 
students, through a permanent program of instruction at designated civi- 
lian educational institutions, those qualities of leadership and other attri- 
butes essential to their progressive advancement to positions of increasing 
responsibility as commissioned officers in the United States Air Force. 



Course of Instruction 

Programs of instruction for both Army and Air Force ROTC consist of 
a two-year basic course and a two-year advanced course. The satisfactory 
completion of the basic course in either the Army or Air Force ROTC is 
required for all physically fit male freshmen and sophomores unless they 
are excused by the college administration. (All veterans who were in active 
service for as long as six months are excused from this requirement, but 
may enroll in the basic course of Army or Air Force ROTC to qualify for 
later enrollment in advanced courses.) 

The College provides, in cooperation with the Air Force and the Army, 
a flight instruction program. A limited number of highly qualified cadets 
from both ROTC units pp.rticipate in this instruction which includes 
approximately 35 hou)s of flying in light aircraft plus ground school. 
Successful completion of this phase of the ROTC course qualifies the 
cadet for a Federal Aviation Agency pilot's certificate. 

Satisfactory completion of the advanced courses qualifies a student for 
commissioning as a second lieutenant in the Army or Air Force Reserve 
upon graduation from the College. A detailed description of all military 
courses is given under each of the departments in the section of the catalog 
which lists course descriptions. 



Military Science 



The satisfactory completion of the first year of the Army ROTC course 
is a prerequisite for entering the second year. Enrollment in advanced 
courses is elective on the part of the student. The selection of advanced 
course students is made from applicants who are physically qualified and 
who have above average academic and military records. Veterans who have 
one year or more of service in the Armed Forces are eligible for enroll- 
ment in the Army ROTC advanced course upon reaching their junior 
year, provided they are in good academic standing, physically qualified. 



Military Training 43 

have not reached their 27th birthday, and are selected by the PMS and 
the Chancellor. 

The Army ROTC course includes instruction in American military 
history, map reading, leadership, military teaching methods, military ad- 
ministration, operations, and logistics. These subjects not only prepare 
students to be officers in the United States Army, but also awaken in them 
an appreciation of the obligations of citizenship and secure for them per- 
sonal benefits resulting from practical application of organization and 
responsible leadership. An elective subject is chosen from general academic 
areas in effective communication, science comprehension, general psychol- 
ogy, or political development and political institutions for utilization in the 
junior and senior years. 



Air Science 

Enrollment in the Air Force ROTC advanced course is elective on the 
part of the student. Selection of advanced course students is made from 
applicants who are physically qualified and who have above average aca- 
demic and military records. Qualified veterans desiring a commission 
through the AFROTC will be required to take that portion of the basic 
course, wdth their non-veteran contemporaries, which remains before they 
are classified as academic juniors. All veterans must have completed their 
academic and military requirements prior to their 28th birthday. 

The Air Force ROTC course of study includes instruction in founda- 
tions of air power. Air Force officer development, leadership, and air 
power concepts. The Air Force ROTC curriculum is designed to prepare 
the student for his obligations of citizenship to his country as an officer 
in the United States Air Force or as a civilian. 



Uniforms and Equipment 



Officer-type uniforms for students enrolled in both basic and advanced 
courses in Army ROTC are provided by the Federal Government, Stu- 
dents enrolled in the basic course in Air Force ROTC are provided Air 
Force-type uniforms. For students enrolled in advanced courses in either 
Army or Air Force ROTC, the College is furnished a monetary allowance 
by the Federal Government for the purchase of uniforms. Army and Air 
Force equipment for instruction of students is provided by the Federal 
Government. Both uniforms and equipment are issued to the College, 
which is responsible for their care. 



44 The General Catalog 

Credit 

Credit is allowed for work at other institutions having an ROTC unit 
established in accordance with the provisions of the National Defense 
Act and regulations governing the ROTC. Record of a student's prior 
training in the ROTC is obtained from the institution concerned. 



Financial Aid 

Students enrolled in the advanced course are paid a monetary allowance 
in lieu of subsistence at the daily rate equal to the value of the commuted 
ration ($0.90) for a total period not to exceed 595 days during the two 
years of the course. Students in the basic course receive no monetary 
allowance. 



Organizafion of the ROTC 

Army 

The Army ROTC unit at State College consists of an Army brigade and 
a drum and bugle corps. The Army brigade, commanded by a cadet colonel 
and staff, consists of a provisional batallion and three battle groups. The 
cadet colonel and all other cadet officers are selected from students en- 
rolled in the second year advanced course. Cadet first sergeants and ser- 
geants first class are appointed from students enrolled in the first year 
advanced course. Certain specially selected students in the second year 
basic course also are appointed as cadet non-commissioned officers. Cadet 
officers and non-commissioned officers obtain invaluable experience in 
leadership by being responsible for conducting all drill instruction. They 
are observed and supervised in this by the officers and non-commissioned 
officers of the Army assigned to the College. 

Air Force 

The Air Force ROTC unit consists of an Air Force wing and a drill 
team. The Air Force ROTC wing, commanded by a cadet colonel, con- 
sists of three groups which are composed of four squadrons each. These 
squadrons are divided into three flights per squadron, each flight consist- 
ing of three squads. The wing, group, squadron, and flight commander 
and their staff are cadet commissioned oflicers and are selected from cadets 
enrolled in the advanced course. All other positions are held by cadet non- 
commissioned officers who are selected from the first year advanced and 
second year basic cadets. Cadet officers and non-commissioned officers ob- 



Military Training 45 



tain invaluable experience in leadership by being responsible for planning 
and conducting all diill instruction. They are observed and supervised by 
the officers and airmen assigned to the College. 



Distinguished Militory Students 

The College is authorized to name outstanding students of the Army 
ROTC and Air Force ROTC as distinguished military students. These 
students may, upon graduation, be designated distinguished military grad- 
uates and may be selected for commissions in the regular Army and Air 
Force, provided they so desire. 



Selective Service in Relation to the ROTC 

Enrollment in the ROTC does not in itself defer a student from induc- 
tion and" service under the Universal Military Training and Service Act. 
The law provides that "within sutli numbers as may be prescribed by the 
Secretary of Defense, any person who (a) has been or may hereafter be 
selected for enrollment or continuance in the senior division, Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps, or the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps; 
(b) agrees, in writing, to accept a commission, if tendered, and to serve, 
subject to order of the secretary of the Military Department having juris- 
diction over him; and (c) agrees to remain a member of a regular or re- 
sers^e component until the eighth anniversary of the receipt of a commis- 
sion in accordance with his obligation under subsection 'd' of section four 
of this title, shall be defened from induction under this title after com- 
pletion or termination of the course of instruction and so long as he con- 
tinues in a regular or reserve status upon being commissioned, but shall 
not be exempt from registration." 




WKF'u M 

MfgMM 






47 



SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



This section of the catalog lists the eight schools of the College and ex- 
plains the programs of study within the schools. 

Each of the College's schools is administered by a dean. The main aca- 
demic divisions of the College are the Schools of Agriculture, Design, 
Education. Engineering. Liberal Arts, Eorestry. Physical Sciences and 
Applied Mathematics, and Textiles. 

North Carolina State College, the technical branch of the Consolidated 
University of North Carolina, provides an opportunity for its students to 
obtain top-level scientific as well as technical training. Also, the students are 
ofiEered the broad general education which is a necessary prerequisite to 
specialization. 

Throughout the programs of study given in this section, departmental 
codes, course numbers, and course titles are used. Additional information 
concerning specific courses may be found in the Description of Courses 
section. The following code is given to assist in locating course descriptions. 



Code Name 

AC— Agricultural Communications (see Agriculture) 

AG— Agriculture 

AGC— Agricultural Economics 

AGE— Agricultural Engineering 

A\S— Animal Science 

AN T— An thropologv 

ARC— Architecture 

-AS- Air Science 

BO— Botany and Bacteriology 

BS-Biology 

CE— Civil Engineering 

CH— Chemistry 

CHE— Chemical Engineering 



Code Name 

CS— Crop Science 

DN— Design 

E— Engineering 

EC— Economics 

•ED— Education (General Courses) 

EE— Electrical Engineering 

EH— Engineering Honors 

EM— Engineering Mechanics 

ENG— English 

ENT— Entomology 

FOR-Forestry 

FS— Food Science 

GN— Genetics 



* Also, Agricultural Education courses, a few Industrial Arts courses. Industrial Education courses, Mathe- 
matics and Science Education courses, and Occupational Information and Guidance courses. 



48 



The General Catalog 



Code Name 

HI— History 

HS— Horticultural Science 

lA— Industrial Arts 

IE— Industrial Engineering 

ISO— International Student Orientation 

LA— Landscape Architecture 

MA— Mathematics 

ME— Mechanical Engineering 

MIC— Ceramic Engineering 

MIG— Geological Engineering 

MIM— Metallurgical Engineering 

ML— Modern Languages (General Courses) 

MLE— Modern Languages (English for 

Foreign Students) 
MLF— Modern Languages (French) 
MLG— Modern Languages (German) 
MLI— Modern Languages (Italian) 
MLR— Modern Languages (Russian) 
MLS— Modern Languages (Spanish) 
MS— Military Science 



Code Name 

NE— Nuclear Engineering 

PD— Product Design 

PE— Physical Education 

PHI— Philosophy 

PO— Poultry Science 

PP— Plant Pathology 

PS— Political Science 

PSM— Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics 

PSY— Psychology 

PY-Physics 

REL— Religion 

RPA— Recreation and Park Administration 

RS— Rural Sociology 

SOC— Sociology 

SS— Social Studies 

SSC-Soil Science 

ST— Experimental Statistics 

TC— Textile Chemistry 

TX— Textile Technology, Knitting Technology, 

and General Course 
ZO— Zoology 




51 

School 

of 

Agriculture 

H. BROOKS JAMES, Dean 

EDWARD W. GLAZENER, Director of Instruction 

The agriculture of our modern world amounts to more than growing food 
and fiber. Agriculture includes all of the technical, professional, and busi- 
ness occupations connected with the processing and distribution of farm 
products. 

The men who produce and supply the farmer with his complex needs, 
the farmer himself, those to whom he sells, the processor of these products, 
and the retailer are all part of today's agriculture. 

All told, they add up to nearly 40 per cent of the 65 million employed 
people in the United States making agriculture the nation's biggest single 
industry. There are more than 500 distinct occupations in today's agricul- 
ture—jobs that each year need more than twice the number of people 
trained to fill them. 

The new concept of agriculture is defined to include three important 
groups in our economy. The first is the farmers themselves. The people 
who are engaged in the production of crops and livestock. The second 
includes those industries which furnish supplies and services to farmers. 
The third includes those industries which process, store, handle, and mer- 
chandise farm products. 

The overall objective of the School of Agriculture is the development 
of well-rounded, educated citizens capable of assuming important roles in 
business, science, and technology as they relate to farming and associated 
industries. 

Facilities 

A sound teaching and research program is based on taking advantage of 
the most modern equipment available in each field. North Carolina State 
College is fortunate to have at its disposal the newest equipment and facili- 
ties in many fields. 

Laboratories are well equipped with the necessary materials for learn- 
ing and practicing the basic and applied sciences. Machinery and equip- 
ment, in some cases provided by private industry, keep students abreast of 
the latest technological advances. Extensive plant, animal, and insect 
collections are available for use in teaching and for research. 

The D. H. Hill Library at State College has a large collection of scienti- 
fic books and periodicals which provides excellent source material for 
many courses. In addition, students may draw from the specialized periodi 
cals and textbooks located in the department libraries. 



52 The General Catalog 

State College's 16 outlying research farms provide a practical classroom 
for many courses, as well as a place where researchers can carry on basic 
and applied research. 

Student Activities 

Students in the School of Agriculture have ample opportunities to take 
part in many broadening extra-curricular activities, both within the school 
and in the College itself. 

Most departments have student organizations which provide professional 
as well as social experience. Student tours provide an opportunity to see 
first-hand the application of classroom principles. 

In addition, judging teams representing animal industry, horticulture, 
and poultry compete regionally and nationally providing student mem- 
bers a chance to travel while learning more about their field. 

Curricular Offerings and Requirements 

The modern concept of agriculture has given State College's oldest 
school its newest look. 

A freshman enrolling in the School of Agriculture now chooses from 
four curricula.— agricultural business, agricultural science, or agricultural 
technology, biological sciences— devised to more closely parallel the new 
concept. 

After completing the first two years, consisting largely of basic courses 
in the biological, physical, and social sciences, the student can choose his 
major from among the 15 departments. 

The student's needs for learning "how to make a living" and for 
learning "how to live" are both given consideration in the three curricula. 
Not only does each student get the solid background in science so necessary 
for today's agriculture, he has a chance to develop a program to fit his 
individual needs and wants. 

Although requirements vary in the curricula, students in all four get 
a solid background in the sciences, plus a variety of electives. All the cur- 
ricula have requirements in English and modern languages, the social 
sciences and humanities, and the physical and biological sciences. In addi- 
tion, electives can be chosen from several specified areas (see curricula 
listing below), depending on the curriculum. The student also will have 
departmental requirements and electives in his major field. 

In general, requirements are similar no matter which curriculum the 
student chooses. However, the program in science places more emphasis 
on the physical and biological sciences, while that in business emphasizes 
economics and business management, and the course in technology is 
stronger in the applied science and technology courses. 

The majors offered in the three curricula are as follows: 

Agricultural 5M5me5J— agricultural economics, animal husbandry, crop 
science, food science, dairy husbandry, horticultural science, poultry science 
and soil science. 



Agriculture 53 

Agricultural Science- agricultural economics, agricultural engineering 

(joint program with the School of Engineering), animal husbandry, botany, 

crop science, food science, dairy husbandry, entomology, horticultural 

science, poultry science, rural sociology, soil science, wildlife biology, and 

zoology. Pre- veterinary work also is taken in this curriculum. 

Agricultural T<?c/?no/og);— agricultural economics, agricultural engineer- 
ing, animal husbandry, crop science, dairy husbandry, horticultural science, 
plant protection, poultry science, and soil science. 

Biological Scioices—Thh curriculum emphasizes the basic biological and 
physical sciences on a non-departmental, broad spectrum, especially de- 
signed as preparatory for graduate study or educational or teaching careers 
in biology. 

Degrees 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon the satisfactory 
completion of one of the curricula in this school. 

The degrees of Master of Science, Master of Agriculture and profes- 
sional degrees are offered in the various departments of the School of 
Agriculture after the satisfactory completion of at least one year of grad- 
uate study in resident. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered by the following depart- 
ments: Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Engineering, Animal Science, 
Crop Science, Botany, Entomology, Food Science, Genetics, Plant Pathology, 
Soil Science, and Zoology. 

Further information may be found in the Graduate School Catalog. 

Opportunities 

Agriculture is a broad field with fascinating new opportunities. It needs 
trained persons to process and distribute agricultural products, to give 
special services to people who actually produce these products, and to 
do research and teaching that will make our agricultural production and 
distribution even more efficient. 

The eight major fields of agriculture— research, industry, business, edu- 
cation, communications, conservation, services, as well as farming and 
ranching— need 15,000 college graduates each year in the United States. 
But at present our colleges are graduating only about 7,000 a year trained 
for these jobs. This leaves more than two jobs for each graduate. 

In North Carolina alone, there is a desperate need for college-trained 
people to farm their own land, and for well-schooled specialists in the 
fertilizer, dairy, feed, insecticide, farm implement and distribution indus- 
tries. These industries put graduates in key positions and call for more 
than State College can supply. 

Some of the opportunities in the nine fields of agricultine are as follows: 

Research— production, marketing, engineering, processing, conservation, 
reclamation, etc. 

Industry— ma.chinery and equipment, chemicals, food processing, grain 
and seed processing, meat and poultry packing, etc. 



54 



The General Catalog 



Business— bsLnking and credit, insurance, farm management, land ap- 
praisal, marketing, transportation, etc. 

£<iwca/?on— vocational agriculture, agricultural extension, college in- 
struction, governmental agencies, etc. 

Communications— writing, reporting, radio, television, newspapers, 
magazines, advertising, publications, etc. 

Conservation—soil, water, range, forest, fish, wildlife, parks, turf, etc. 

Services— inspection and regulation, production field service, quality con- 
trol and grading, agricultural technicians and consultants, etc. 

Farming and rarzc/zmg— general, dairy, swine, beef, sheep, poultry, cotton, 
forage, grain, fruits, tobacco, etc. 

Biological Areas— graduzLte or professional training, high school teaching, 
etc. 

Practically all types of occupations— more than 500 of them— are avail- 
able to a graduate in agriculture. There are many opportunities in tech- 
nology, science, and business. The School of Agriculture stands ready to 
help meet the challenge of the new concept of agriculture with forivard- 
looking curricula. 

Freshman Year 

(The departments in the School of Agriculture have a common freshman year with the 
exception of the science program in the Department of Agricultural Engineering. For the 
agricultural science, agricultural engineering freshman year see Departw.ent of Agricultural 
Engineering.) 



Fall Semester Credits 

AG 103. School Orientation 1 

ENG 111, Composition 3 

MA 111, Algebra and Trigonometry .— 4 

or 
MA 101, Algebra and Trigonometry .... 5 
HI 261, U. S. in Western Civilization _.. 3 

BO 103, General Botany 4 

PE 101, Physical Education - 1 

MS 101, Military Science I 

or 
AS 121, Air Science I 1 



Credits 



17-18 



Spring Semester 

ENG 112, Composition 3 

MA 112, Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

or 
MA 102, Analytic Geometry 

and Calculus _ 4 

PS 201, American Governmental 

System 3 

ZO 103, General Zoology . .._ 4 

PE 102, Physical Education —- 1 

MS 102, Military Science I 

or 
AS 122, Air Science I 1 



16 



Agricultural Business Curriculum 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

F.XG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 3 

CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry .... 4 
PSV 200, Introduction to Psychology ..- 3 

RS 301, Sociology of Rural Life 3 

EC 201, Economics 3 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 

MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 221. Air Science II 1 



Credits 



18 



Spring Semester 

ML, Modern Language Elective 

or 

E\G, English Elective 3 

.\GC 212, Economics of -Agriculture 3 

PY 221, College Physics 5 

Ciroup D Elective 3 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 

MS 202, Military Science II 

or 
AS 222, Air Science II 1 



16 



Agriculture 



55 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester 

Group B Electives _ _ 6 Group B Electives 

Group A or C Electives . 3 Departmental Requirements 

Departmental Requirements _ 6 Free Elective 

Free Elective -_ . 3 

18 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester 

Group B Electives 6 Group B Electives 

Group A or C Elective _ 2 Departmental Requirements _ 

Departmental Requirements _ _ 7 Free Elective ..^ 

Free Elective — 3 



18 



Credits 
_ 6 

e 

-_ S 
15 



Crrdttf 

__ e 

... 7 
_. 3 



16 



Agricultural Science Curriculum 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 

ML, Modern Language Elective 



Credits 



ENG, English Elective 3 

CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry 

or 
CH 105, General Inorganic Chemistry .. 4 

•PY 211, General Physics 4 

Group D Elective ._ 3 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 

MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 221, Air Science II 1 



Spring Semester 

ML, Modern Language Elective 
or 

ENG, English Elective 

CH 103, General and Qualitative 

Chemistry 

PY 212, General Physics .._ _ 

Group D Elective 

PE 202, Physical Education 

MS 202, Military Science II 

or 
AS 222, Air Science II 



Credits 



16 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester 

Group A Elective _ 5 Group A, B, or C Elective _. 

Group D Elective 3 Group D Elective — . 

Departmental Requirements 6 Departmental Requirements 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 

17 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester 

Group A Elective _ 4 Group A Electives 

Group A, B, or C Elective _ 3 Group D Elective 

Departmental Requirements 7 Departmental Requirements 

Free Elective _ 3 Free Elective 



Credits 
___ 6 
_- 8 

6 

3 



17 



18 



Physics 221 substituted for 211-212 In some agricultural programs. 



56 



The General Catalog 



Agricultural Technology Curriculum 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 3 SOI 200, Soils 4 

CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry 4 CH 103, General and Qualitative 

PY 221, General Physics 5 Chemistry _ 4 

EC 201, Economics 3 AGC 212, Economics of Agriculture 3 

PE 201, Physical Education _ - 1 RS 301, Sociology of Rural Life 3 

MS 201, Military Science II PE 202, Physical Education 1 

or MS 202, Military Science II 

AS 221. Air Science II 1 or 

AS 222, Air Science II 1 

17 

16 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester 

Modern Language Elective Group A Elective 

or Group D Elective 

English Elective _ 3 Departmental Requirements 

Group D Elective 3 Free Elective 

Defartmental Requirements .6 

Group C Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



Credits 

3 

3 

-_ 7 
-_ 3 



16 



18 



Fall Semester 

Group A or B Elective 

Croup C Elective 

Departmental Requirements 

Fret Elective _ - 



Senior Year 

Credits Spring Semester 

Group C Electives 



5 
3 

7 
3 

18 



Departmental Requirements 
Free Elective 



Credits 

6 

7 

3 



16 



Credits Required for Graduation 



Agricultural 
Business 

Language 12 

Social Science and Humanities 

(Group D») 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 25 

Restricted Electives: 

Group B _. 24 

Group A and C 5 

Introduction to Agriculture 1 

Departmental Requirements 26 



Agricultural 
Science 






Agricultural 
Technology 


12 






12 


21 
28 






21 
33 


Group AA*» 26 

1 
26 


Group 
Group 


A, 
C 


B 9-11 

9-12 

1 

27 



" Group A includes the physical and biological sciences: Group B, economics and business management; 
Gioup C, applied science and technology; and Group D, social sciences and humanities. 
•• Six credits may be elected from Groups B and C. Social Science majors may select from Group D. 



Free Electives 



Physical Education 
PE 101, 102. 201. 202 

Military Science I and II 
MS 101. 102, 201, 202 
or 



12 



126 
4 





Agriculture 


12 


12 


126 
4 


126 
4 



57 



Air Science I and II 
AS 121. 122, 221. 222 



Group Electives 



Group A 



Physical Sciences 




Chemistry 




CH 103 


General and Qualitative Chemistry 


CH 107 


General and Qualitative Chemistry 


CH 108 


General and Qualitative Chemistry Lab 


CH 215 


Quantitative Analysis 


CH 220 


General and Organic Chemistry 




All courses at 400 level and above 


Mathematics 




MA 201 


Calculus I 


MA 202 


Calculus II 


MA 211, 212 


Analytical Geometry and Calculus 


MA 215 


Finite Mathematics 




All courses at 300 level and above 


Mineral Industries 




MIG 120 


Physical Geology 


MIG 222 


Historical Geology 


MIG 323 


Paleontology 


MIG 330 


Mineralogy 


MIG 442 


Petrology 


Physics 




PY 202 or 212 


General Physics 


PY 223 


Astronomy and Astrophysics 




All courses at 300 level and above 


Soil Science 




SSC 200 


Soils 


SSC 302 


Soils and Plant Growth 


SSC 452 


Soil Classification 


SSC 511 


Soil Physics 


SSC 521 


Soil Chemistry 


SSC 551 


Soil Morpholog)', Genesis and Classification 


Statistics 




ST 302 


Statistical Laboratory 


ST 311 


Introduction to Statistics 


ST 361, 362 


Introduction to Statistics for Engineers I, 11 



All courses at 500 level 



58 



The General Catalog 



Biological Sciences 

Agricultural Engineering 



AGE 303 


Energy Conversion for Agricultural Production 




Animal Science 






ANS 312 
ANS 408 


Principles of Livestock Nutrition 
Reproduction and Lactation 




Bacteriology 
BO 412 


General Bacteriology 




Botany 
BO 214 
BO 403 
BO 421 
BO 441 


Dendrology 
Systematic Botany 
Plant Physiology 
Plant Ecology 
All courses at 500 level 




Entomology 
ENT 301 
ENT 312 


Introduction to Forest Insects 
Economic Entomology 
All courses at 500 level 




Food Science 






FS 502 
FS 505 
FS 506 


Food Chemistry 
Food Microbiology 
Advanced Food Microbiology 




Genetics 






GN 301 
GN 411 
GN 512 
GN 513 


Genetics in Human Affairs 
Principles of Genetics 
Genetics 
Cytogenetics 




Plant Pathology 

PP 315 
PP 318 
PP 500 
PP 501 
PP 502 


Plant Diseases 

Diseases of Forest Trees 

Advanced Plant Pathology 

Advanced Plant Pathology Lab, Field Crop Diseases 

Advanced Plant Pathology Lab, Horticulture Crop Diseases 




Poultry 
PO 401 
PO 521 
PO 522 


Poultry Diseases 
Poultry Nutrition 
Endocrinology, of the Fowl 




Zoology 
ZO 212 
ZO 213 
ZO 223 
ZO 301 
ZO 315 


Human Anatomy 
Human Physiology 
Comparative Anatomy 
Animal Physiology 
Animal Parasitology 






All courses at 500 level except ZO 521, 551 and 552 which appear in 
Group C. 



Other courses in the Physical and Biological Sciences not presently listed may be elected upon 
approval of the director of instruction. 



Agriculture 



59 



Group B 

Economies and Business Management 

Students in the Agricultural Business curriculum will select one course each in the areas of 
accounting, macroeconomics, marketing, and management. In addition, two courses will be 
selected in the area of general business and two courses in general economics. It is suggested 
that students in Agricultural Science and Agricultural Technology choose Croup B electives 
from the first four areas. 



1. Accounting: 

2. Macro-economics: 

3. Marketing: 



4. Management: 



5. General Business: 
EC 315 
EC 401. 402 
EC 407 
EC 409 
EC 414 
EC 420 
EC 426 
EC 431 
EC 432 
EC 525 
AGC 413 
AGC 523 



EC 312 

EC 302 

EC 411 

or 
AGC 311 

EC 425 

or 
AGC 303 



Accounting for Engineers* 

National Income and Economic Welfare 

Marketing Methods 

Organization and Business Management of Marketing 
Firms 

Industrial Management 

Organization and Business Management of Farms 



(select two courses) 

Salesmanship 

Principles of Accounting* • 

Business Law I 

Introduction to Production Costs 

Tax Accounting 

Corporation Finance 

Personnel Management 

Labor Problems 

Industrial Relations 

Management Policy and Decision Making 

Farm Appraisal and Finance 

Planning Farm and Area Adjustments 



6. Gerzera/ Economics, (select two courses) 



EC 310 
EC 410 
EC 413 
EC 440 
EC 446 
EC 448 
EC 450 
AGC 521 
AGC 533 
AGC 551 



Economics of the Firm 

Industry Studies 

Competition, Monopoly and Public Policy 

Economics of Growth 

Economic Forecasting 

International Economics 

Economic Decision Processes 

Procurement, Processing & Distribution of Agricultural Products 

Agricultural Policy 

Agricultural Production Economics 



Group C 

Applied Science and Technology 

Agricultural Communications 
\C 311 Agricultural Communications Metliods and Madia 

Agricultural Engineering 

AGE 201 Farm Shop ^Voodwork 

AGE 202 Farm Shop Metalwork 

AGE 211 Farm Power and Machinery I 

AGE 321 Irrigation, Drainage and Terracing 

AGE 332 Farm Building and Crop Processing 

AGE 341 Farm Electrification and Utilities 



* If a one year seqjcnce in accounting is desired, the student should elect EC 409 from Group 5. 
'* EC 401 may be substituted for EC 312 if the sequence EC 401, 402 is preferred. 



60 



The General Catalog 



Animal Science 
ANS 201 

ANS 202 
ANS 302 
ANS 308 
ANS 404 
ANS 407 
ANS 503 
ANS 505 

Crop Science 
CS 211 
CS 311 
CS 312 
CS 413 
CS 414 
CS 511 

Entomology 
ENT 322 

Food Science 
FS 303 
FS 309 
FS 401 
FS 404 

Horticultural Science 
HS 201 
HS 301 
HS 342 
HS 421 
HS 432 
HS 441, 442 
HS 481 

Poultry Science 
PO 201 
PO 301 
PO 351 
PO 402 
PO 520 

Soil Science 
SSC 341 
SSC 461 

Zoology 
ZO 312 
ZO 321 
ZO 521 
ZO 551, 552 



Elements Dairy Science 
Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 
Selecting Dairy and Meat Animals 
Advanced Selecting Dairy and Meat Animals 
Dairy Farm Problems 
Advanced Livestock Production 
Animal Breeding 
Diseases of Farm Animals 



Field Crops I 

Field Crops II 

Pastures and Forage Crops 

Plant Breeding 

Weeds and Their Control 

Tobacco Technology 



Beekeeping 



Meat and Meat Products 
Meat Selection 

Mktg. Milk and Related Products 
Poultry Products 



Principles of Horticulture 

Plant Propagation 

Landscape Gardening 

Fruit Production 

Vegetable Production 

Floriculture I and II 

Breeding of Horticulture Plants 



Poultry Production 

Poultry Quality Evaluation 

Poultry Grading 

Commercial Poultry Enterprises 

Poultry Breeding 



Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 

Soil Conservation and Management 



Principles of Game Management 
Wildlife and Natural Resource Conservation 
Fishery Biolog)' 
Wildlife Management 



Engineering 
EM 341 
EM 342 
EM 343 
IE 332 
MIM 321 



Group C Electives in Other Schools 



Mechanics A (Statics) 
Mechanics B (Dynamics) 
Strength of Materials A 
Motion and Time Study 
Metallurgy 



Agriculture 



61 



Forestry 
FOR 311 



Principles of Farm Forestry 



Psychology 
PSY 337 



Industrial Psychology I 



Other courses in Applied Science and Technology not presently listed may be elected upon 
approval of the director of instruction. 



Group D 



Social Science and Humanities 

Agricultural Economics 

AGC 212 Economics of Agriculture 

Economic Analysis of Factor Markets 



Economic Principles 

Production and Prices 

Economics of the Firm 

Economics of Growth 

Evolution of Economic Ideas 

Economic Forecasting 

International Economics 

Intermediate Economic Theory 

Money, Income and Employment 

Origins of the United States Economy 

Mathematical Models in Economics 

Econometrics 

Introduction to Linear Programming 



The Ancient World 

The Medieval World 

The Modern Western World 

Modern Europe 

The United States to 1865 

The United States since 1865 

The United States in Western Civilization 

All courses at 300 level and above 



AGC 512 


Economics 


EC 


201, 202 


EC 


301 


EC 


310 


EC 


440 


EC 442 


EC 446 


EC 


448 


EC 


501 


EC 


502 


EC 


541 


EC 


550 


EC 


552 


EC 


555 


History 


HI 


201 


HI 


202 


HI 


205 


HI 


225, 226 


HI 


251 


HI 


252 


HI 


261 



Political Science 

PS 201 
PS 202 
PS 301 
PS 302 
PS 376 



The American Governmental System 
County and Municipal Government 
Comparative Political Systems 
Contemporary World Politics 
Latin American Governments and Politics 



All courses at 400 level and above 



62 



The General Catalog 



Philosophy and Religion 



PHI 201 
PHI 203 
PHI 205 
REL 301 
REL 302 
REL S03 
PHI 305 
PHI 306 
PHI 307 
PHI 309 
PHI 311 
PHI 395 



Logics 

Introduction to Philosophy 

Problems and Types of Philosophy 

Religious Groups & Trends in the U. S. 

The Bible and Its Background 

Christian Ethics 

Philosophy of Religion 

Philosophy of Art 

Ethics 

Marriage and Family Living 

Parent-Child Relationships 

Philosophical Analysis 

All courses at 400 level and above 



Psychology 

PSY 200 
PSY 201 
PSY 302 
PSY 304 
PSY 337 



PSY 476 
PSY 490 
PSY 511 
PSY 565 



Introduction to Psychology 
Elementary Experimental Psychology 
Psychology of Personality and Adjustment 
Educational Psychology 
Industrial Psychology I 

All courses at 400 level and above including: 
Psychology of Adolescence 
Social Psychology 
Advanced Social Psychology 
Industrial Management Psychology 



Rural Sociology 

RS 301 
RS 521 
RS 322 
RS 441 
RS 442 



Sociology of Rural Life 
Introduction to Social Research 
Introduction to Rural Social Woik 
Rural Social Pathology 
Rural Social Structure 



Sociology and Anthropology 

ANT 305 People of the World 

ANT 251 Physical Anthropology 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology 

SOC 202 Man and Society (General Sociology) 

SOC 301 Human Behavior 

SOC 302 Public Relations and Modern Society 

SOC 303 Current Social Problems 

SOC 304 Contemporary Family Life 

SOC 305 Race Relations 

SOC 306 Criminology 

All courses at 400 level and above 



Social Studies 

SS 301, 302 
SS 491, 492 



Contemporary Civilization 
Contemporary Issues 



Other courses in Social Sciences and Humanities not presently listed may be elected upon 
approval of the director of instruction. 



Agriculture 63 

Department of Agricultural Economics 

Professor Charles E. Bishop, Head of the Department 

Teaching and Research 

P'nfessors: 

Arthur J. Coutu, H. Brooks James, Richard A. King, James G. Maddox, ^Valter H. 

Pierce, George S. Tolley, Willl\m D. Toussaint 
Visiting Professor: Erwin E. Liebhafsky 
Associate Professors: 

William R. Henry, James A. Seacraves, T. Dudley Wallace, James C. Williamson, Jr. 
Assistant Professors: 

Dale M. Hoover, Loren A. Ihnen, Duane F. Neuman, R. James Peeler, Jr., Richard L. 

Simmons 
Instructors: 

Wayne E. Boyet, Garnett L. Bradford, Adger B. Carroll, Bobby R. Eddleman, Warren 

E. Johnston, Josfj>h C. Matthews, Jr., John W. Nixon, Gordon S. Sanford, T. Kelley 

W^hite, Jr. 
Extension 

Associate Professor Charles R. Pugh, In Charge of Farm Management 
Professor: 

Willl\m L. Tmu>JER 
Associate Professors: 

Robert L. Johnstone, Clyde R. Weathers 
Assistant Professors: 

James G. Allgood, E. Walton Jones 
Instructors: 

Hugh L. Liner, Fred A. Mancum, Paul S. Stone 
Professor George L. Capel, In Charge of Marketing 
Professor: 

Clayton P. Libeau 
Associate Professors: 

Robert S. Boal, Guy R. Cassell, Henry A. Homme, T. Everett Nichols, Jr., Edwin A. 

Proctor 
Assistant Professors: 

Maurice E. Thigpen, Ruby P. Uzzle 
Instructor: 

Robert D. Dahle 



The Department of Agricultural Economics offers programs of study lead- 
ing to the Bachelor of Science, Master of Agricultural Economics, Master 
of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Three options are available to undergraduate students majoring in 
agricultural economics. These options include agricultural business, agri- 
cultural science, and agricultural technology. Students are given training 
in all aspects of organizing and operating agricultural business firms. A 
sound foundation in basic economic principles in production and market- 
ing is provided in order that graduates will be able to deal with problems 
associated with the rapid changes in technical and economic conditions. 

The general objectives of the department are as follows: 

(1) To train students to make sound decisions in organizing and man- 
aging farms and other agricultural businesses. 

(2) To train students in the fundamentals of business organization. 

(3) To provide an understanding of the relation of agriculture to other 
parts of the economy and how to evaluate agricultural policy and economic 
changes which affect agriculture. 



64 The General Catalog 



(4) To train graduate students in advanced economic theory and re- 
search techniques. 



Opportunities 

Training in agricultural economics qualifies a student for a wide range 
of opportunities. Many graduates of the department are employed in re- 
search and educational work by various agencies of the federal and state 
governments. These agencies include the Agricultural Extension Service, 
the Agricultural Experiment Station, the State Department of Agriculture, 
and other agencies of the United States Department of Agriculture. 

The growing number of companies processing and manufacturing agri- 
cultural products has created an increasing demand for people trained in 
agricultural economics. Opportunities here include employment by com- 
panies handling farm supplies such as feed, fertilizer, and equipment; gen- 
eral marketing and processing firms; agricultural cooperatives; profes- 
sional farm management agencies, and various credit agencies. 

Openings in all of these areas greatly exceed the number of graduates 
trained to fill them. And as industrial and agricultural development of 
the region continues, employment opportunities are expected to increase. 



Facilities 

The department has a modem and well equipped library, including all 
of the major professional journals and USDA publications. Experiment 
station publications from other institutions throughout the United States 
are kept on file. Modem computational and reproduction equipment is 
available. In addition, the department has access to cooperative use of 
IBM equipment in the Department of Experimental Statistics, including a 
650 digital computer and a Rand 1105 computer. The department is 
housed in Patterson Hall. 



Undergraduate Curriculum 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in Agricultural Eco- 
nomics may be earned under the agricultural business and agricultural 
science curricula in the School of Agriculture. In addition, students must 
meet all of the basic requirements of the College and the School of Agri- 
culture. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 54-56. 

Agricultural Business— The requirements for the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows: 



Agriculture 65 

Group B Courses (24 Credits) 

Credits 

AGC 311, Organization and Business Management of Marketing Finns 3 

AGC 551, Agricultural Production Economics 3 

AGC 552, Consumption, Distribution and Prices in Agriculture 3 

EC 302, National Income and Economic Welfare 8 

EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 
or 

EC 401, Principles of Accounting 3 

EC 407, Business Law I 3 

Electives ■ 6 

Group A end C Courses (6 Credits) 

CH 103, General and Qualitative Chemistry 4 

Electives 2 

Deportmentol Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 

AGC 303, Organization and Business Management of Farms — . 3 

ST 311, Introduction to Statistics 3 

AGC 533, Agricultural Policy __ 3 

AGC 521, Procurement, Processing and Distribution of Agricultural Products 
or 

AGC 523, Planning Farm and Area Adjustments 3 

Electives 14 

Agricultural Science— The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 



Group A Courses (26 Credits) 



Credits 



MA 211 and 212, Analytic Geometry and Calculus B, C 
or 

MA 201 and 202, Analytic Geometry and Calculus II and III 6 or 8 

Electives 18 or 20 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 

Credits 

AGC 303, Organization and Business Management of Farms 3 

AGC 311, Organization and Business Management of Marketing Firms 3 

AGC 533, Agricultural Policy 3 

AGC 551, Agricultural Production Economics 3 

AGC 552, Consumption, Distribution, and Prices in Agriculture 3 

ST 311, Introduction to Statistics ^ 3 

EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 
or 

EC 401, Principles of Accounting 3 

Electives — — 5 

Graduate Study 

The Department of Agricultural Economics offers programs of study 
leading to the Master of Agricultural Economics, the Master of Science, 
and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Special emphasis is placed on the economics of agricultural production 
and marketing, analysis of programs and policies affecting agriculture, and 
statistical techniques which can be used in solving agricultural problems. 



66 The General Catalog 

Department- of Agriculturai Engineering 

Professor F. J. Hassler, Head of the Department 

Teaching and Research 

Professors: 

H. D. Bowen, J. M. Fore, W. E. Splinter, Jan van Schilfgaarde, John W. Weaver, Jr. 
Associate Professor: 

Ezra L. Howell 
Assistant Professors: 

George B. Blum, Jr., W. H. Johnson, K. A. Jordan, David A. Link, C. W. Suggs 
Instructors: 

E. O. Beasley, J. F. Beeman, E. G. Humphries, Edward H. Wiser, F. Scott Wright 
Head Mechanic: 

Ralph B. Greene 
Extension 

Professor H. M. Ellis, In Charge 
Associate Professors: 

J. C. Ferguson, R. M. Ritchie, W. C. Warrick 
Assistant Professors: 

J. W. Glover, R. W. Watkins 
Instructor: 

R. E. Sneed 

Students in agricultural engineering are educated and trained to deal with 
problems of agriculture that are engineering in nature. Involved are the 
application of scientific and engineering principles to the conservation and 
utilization of water and soil, the development of power and labor-saving 
devices for all phases of agricultural production, the design of structures 
and equipment for housing and handling livestock and field products, and 
the processing and marketing of farm products. 

The need for men to carry out the technical aspects such as develop- 
ment and research as well as less technical work, such as sales and service 
of farm equipment requires the offering of two distinct curricula as 
described below. 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering is housed in the Agri- 
cultural Engineering Building. 

Opportunities 

Men trained in agricultural engineering under the science curriculum 
are qualified for positions in design, development and research in public 
institutions and in industry, and for teaching and extension work in insti- 
tutions of higher education. The curriculum also provides adequate train- 
ing for postgraduate work leading to advanced degrees. 

Men trained in the field of agricultural engineering technology are 
qualified for positions in sales and service of agricultural equipment such 
as farm machinery, irrigation systems, etc.; as county agents or farmers; 
and for farm advisory work with such organizations as electric power 
companies. 

Undergraduate Curriculum 

Agricultural Science— This curriculum, offered in conjunction with the 
School of Engineering, is designed to develop young men capable of engi- 
neering leadership in agriculture. Emphasis is placed on basic science 



Agriculture 67 

courses such as mathematics, physics, mechanics, biology, soils, and thermo- 
dynamics, which provide a sound background for engineering and agri- 
cultural technology. Courses in agricultural engineering are directed to 
those methods of thought and techniques whereby science can be applied 
with understanding and judgment to engineering situations in agricultural 
operations. General agriculture courses are provided in order that the 
student can better understand the agricultural industry with which he 
deals. 

Since agricultural engineering involves two distinct technical fields- 
agriculture and engineering— this curriculum is a joint responsibility of 
the two schools and is so administered. Graduates in the program receive 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering. 

Freshman 

Credits 

ENG 111, 112, English Composition 6 

MA 101, 102, Algebra and Trigonometry; Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 9 

AG 103, School Orientation 1 

CH 101, General Chemistry I . 4 

AGE 151, 152, Farm Mechanics ______..__ 4 

ME 101, 102, Engineering Graphics I, II 4 

MS 101. 102, Military Science I 
or 

AS 121, 122, Air Science I 2 

PE 101, 102, Physical Education 2 



32 



Sophomore 

Credits 

EM 200, Introduction to Mechanics 3 

CH 103, General Chemistry II 4 

CE 201. Surveying I 3 

AGE 211, Farm Power and Machinery 3 

MA 201, 202, Analytic Geometry and Calculus II and III 8 

PY 201, 202, General Physics 10 

MS 201, 202, Military Science II 
or 

AS 221. 222. Air Science II 2 

PE 201. 202. Physical Education 2 

35 

Junior 

Credits 

BO 103. General Botany 4 

EC 201, Economics . _.__ . 3 

EE 320. Elements of Electrical Engineering 4 

EM 301. Solid Mechanics I 3 

EM 303, Fluid Mechanics I 3 

ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 3 

ME 301. Engineering Thermodynamics I 3 

MA 301, Differential Equations 3 

SSC 200, Soils 4 

English Elective „ 3 

Electives 6 

39 



Credits 



68 The General Catalog 

Senior 

HI 261, The United States in Western Civilization 3 

AGC 212, Economics of Agriculture 
or 

AGC 551, Agricultural Production Economics 3 

AGE 371, Soil and Water Conservation Engineering 4 

AGE 451, Conditioning Principles for Plant and Animal Systems 2 

AGE 452, Senior Seminar 1 

AGE 462, Farm Power and Machinery IIA 4 

AGE 481, Agricultural Structures as Production Units 4 

AGE 491, Rural Electrification 4 

AGE 552, Instrumentation for Agricultural Research and Processing 1 

PS 201, The American Governmental System 3 

RS 301, Sociology of Rural Life 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

Electives 6 



41 



ST 361, Introduction to Statistics for Engineers, and PY 407, Introduction to Modern Physics, 
are recommended for electives. 

Agricultural Engineering Technology— Thh curriculum is designed for 
those who are working on a practical level with farm people. Graduates 
are equipped to apply to the farm the new technology as developed and 
revealed by the research engineer. The courses are presented and directed 
toward the solution of consumer problems with emphasis on the tech- 
niques employed. Graduates from this program will receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. 

For the freshman year program in agricultural engineering technology 
see page 54. 

The requirements of the agricultural engineering technology curriculum 
are as follows: 

Group A and B Courses (9-11 Credits) 

•PY 211, 212, General Physics (8 credits total) 3 

Electives 6-8 

Group C Courses (9-11 Credits) 

Credits 
Electives 9- 11 



Departmental Requirements ond Electives (27 Credits) 

AGE 151, 152, Farm Mechanics 4 

AGE 211, Farm Power and Machinery 3 

AGE 303, Energy Conversion 2 

AGE 321, Irrigation, Terracing and Drainage 3 

AGE 411, Farm Power and Machinery IIB 3 

AGE 332, Farm Buildings and Crop Processing 3 

AGE 341, Farm Electrification and Utilities 3 

AGE 452, Seminar 1 

ME 101, Engineering Graphics I 2 

AGE 331, Food Process Engineering 3 

• PY 211 ond 212 will be token in ploce of PY 221 as shown in the Agricultural Technology Curriculum. 
These 3 additional credits ore Group A electives required by the department. 



Agriculture 69 

Graduate Study 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering offers advanced study 
leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in any one of five fields of 
specialization: power and machinery, rural structures, soil and water con- 
servation, rural electrification, or agricultural processing. 

The Master of Science program in agricultural engineering provides a 
broad background in science and engineering through advanced study in 
mathematics and physics. 

For those interested primarily in existing technology, a program of study 
for the Master of Agricultural Engineering degree permits selections from 
a variety of advanced application courses. This program provides training 
appropriate for those engaged in the dissemination of information either 
as extension workers with public institutions or service representatives for 
industry. It is not intended as preliminary study to the Doctor of Philoso- 
phy degree. 



Agronomy 

See Crop Science and Soil Science 

Deportmenf- of Animol Science 

Professor I. D. Porterfieu), Head of the Department 

Teaching and Research 

Professors: 

E. R. Barrick, E. G. Batte, George Hyatt, J. E. Legates, H. A. Stewart, G. Matrone, 
W. R. Murley, F. H. Smith, S. B. Tove, L. C. Ulberg, G. H. Wise 

Associate Professors: 

A. J. Clawson, E. U. Dillard, Lemuel Goode, J. G. Leece, R. D. Mochrie, H. A. Ramsey, 

W. W. G. Smart, Jr., M. B. Wise 
Assistant Professors: 

H. B. Craig, J. P. Everett, J. M. Leatherwood, J. J. McNeill, D. J. Mongol, J. L. 

Moore, R. M. Myers, O. W. Robison 
Instructors: 

G. L. Ellis, I. J. Ellis, J. H. Gregory, D. O. Morgan, J. D. Pettyjohn, W. L. Tucker 
Extension 
Professors: 

A. V. Allen, T. C. Blalock, J. S. Buchanan, Jack Kelley, M. E. Senger 
Associate Professors: 

J. D. George, G. S. Parsons, J. W. Patterson, J. R. Woodard 
Assistant Professors: 

F. N. Knott, R. L. McGuire, R. R. Rich, D. G. Spruill 

Undergraduate students in the Department of Animal Science are in- 
structed in the basic principles of subjects relating to various phases of 
dairy and livestock production. To meet the needs of specialized interests, 
two majors, animal husbandry and dairy husbandry, are offered in each of 
the three curricula in the School of Agriculture. A third major, animal 
nutrition, in the agricultural science curriculum, is in the advanced plan- 
ning stage. Thus, the purpose of these offerings is to present challenges 
to and to provide preparation of students from various backgrounds for 



70 The General Catalog 

constructive and progressive participation in the ever-expanding fields of 
animal agriculture. 

Opportunities 

There are many and varied opportunities for students who major in 
any of the animal industry programs. 

Animal Husbandry 

Kinds of work for which graduates are qualified include the following: 
farm operations, livestock management, fieldmen for breed associations 
and livestock organizations, agricultural extension, education work with 
business and industries serving agriculture, meat grading, communica- 
tions (livestock and market news with radio and TV stations), sales work 
with feed, equipment and pharmaceutical companies, graduate study, 
research with industry and educational institutions, livestock buying and 
livestock and farm loans with banks and lending agencies. 

Dairy Husbandry 

Kinds of work for which graduates are qualified include: agricultural 
extension and other educational work, feed consulting and sales work, 
dairy herd management, dairy breed promotion, dairy equipment sales, re- 
search and development, marketing dairy cattle and dairy products, dairy 
field work, dairy cattle nutrition, and dairy cattle breeding. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — Animal Husbandry 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in animal husbandry 
may be obtained under any of the three curricula offered by the School 
of Agriculture. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 54-56. 

Agricultural Business— The requirements of the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows: 

Group B Courses (24 Credits) 

Credits 
Electives ._ 24 

Group A Courses (6 Credits) 

Credits 

CH 351, Introductoiy Biochemistry 3 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 3 

Departmental Requirements end Electives (26 Credits) 

Credits 

ANS 202, Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 4 

ANS 303, Meat and Meat Products 3 

ANS 312, Principles of Livestock Nutrition 3 

ANS 406, Animal Industry Seminar . 1 

CH 103, General and Qualitative Chemistry „ 4 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics . 3 

ANS 407, Advanced Livestock Production 4 

Agricultural Science— The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 



Agriculture 7 1 

Group A Courses (25 Credits) 

Credits 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 

CH 351, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology ._ 3 

GN 411. The Principles of Genetics 3 

•Electives 12 

Departmentol Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 

Credits 

ANS 202, Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 4 

ANS 303, Meat and Meat Products 3 

ANS 312, Principles of Livestock Nutrition 3 

ANS 406, Animal Industry Seminar 1 

ANS 408, Reproduction and Lactation 4 

ANS 503, (GN 503), Genetic Improvement of Livestock 3 

ANS 505, Animal Diseases 3 

ANS 407, Advanced Livestock Production 4 

Elective 1 

Agricultural Technology— The requirements of the agricultural tech- 
nology curriculum are as follows: 

Group A and B Courses (10 Credits) 

Credits 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 

CH 351, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 3 

Group C Courses (11 Credits) 

Credits 
Electives 1 1 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (27 Credits) 

Credits 

ANS 202, Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 4 

ANS 302, Selecting Dairy and Meat Animals 2 

ANS 303, Meat and Meat Products 3 

ANS 312, Principles of Livestock Nutrition 3 

ANS 406, Animal Industry Seminar I 

ANS 503, (GN 503), Genetic Improvement of Livestock 3 

CH 103, General and Qualitiative Chemistry 4 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

ANS 407, Advanced Livestock Production 4 

Undergraduate Curriculum — Dairy Husbandry 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in dairy husbandry may 
be obtained under any of the three curricula offered by the School of 
Agriculture. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 54-56. 

Agricultural Business— The requirements of the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows: 

Group B Courses (24 Credits) 

Credits 

Electives 24 



Six credits may be elected from Groups B and C. 



72 The General Catalog 

Group A Courses (7 Credits) 

Credits 

GN 411, Principles of Genetics 3 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 4 

Deportmentol Requirements and Electives (25 Credits) 

Credits 

ANS 201, Elements of Dairy Science 4 

ANS 312, Principles of Livestock Nutrition 3 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 

ANS 404, Dairy Farm Problems 3 

ANS 406, Animal Industry Seminar . 1 

CH 103, General and Qualitative Chemistry 4 

CH 351, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

ANS 408, Reproduction and Lactation 3 

Agricultural Science— The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 

Group A Courses (26 Credits) 

Credits 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 4 

CH 351, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

GN 411, Principles of Genetics 3 

•Electives 16 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 

ANS 201, Elements of Dairy Science 4 

ANS 302, Selecting Dairy and Meat Animals 2 

ANS 312, Principles of Livestock Nutrition 3 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 

ANS 404, Dairy Farm Problems 3 

ANS 406, Animal Industry Seminar 1 

ANS 408, Reproduction and Lactation S 

ANS 503, (GN 503), Genetic Improvement of Livestock 8 

Elective 3 

Agricultural Technology— The requirements of the agricultural tech- 
nology curriculum are as follows: 

Group A and B Courses (10-13 Credits) 

Credits 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 4 

CH 351, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

Electives 0-3 

Group C Courses (9-12 Credits) 

Credits 
Electives 9-12 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 

Credits 

ANS 201, Elements of Dairy Science 4 

ANS 302, Selecting Dairy and Meat Animals 2 

ANS 312, Principles of Livestock Nutrition 3 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 

ANS 404, Dairy Farm Problems S 

ANS 406, Animal Industry Seminar 1 

ANS 408, Reproduction and Lactation 3 

ANS 503, (GN 503), Genetic Improvement of Livestock 3 

Electives 3 



* Six credits may b« elected from Groups B & C. 



Agriculture 73 



Graduate Study 



The Department of Animal Industry offers the Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees in animal industry. The degrees of animal 
industry provide for major programs of work in the fields of animal hus- 
bandry, dairy husbandry, animal nutrition, animal diseases, animal physiol- 
ogy, and animal breeding. 



p^ Depaitmeni- of Bofony and Bacteriology 

Professor H. T. Scofield, Head of the Department 

Teaching and Research 

Professors: 

E. A. Ball, J. B. Evans, L. A. WHrrroRD 
Associate Professors: 

E. O. Beal, J. W. Hardin, J. R. Trover 
Assistant Professors: 

F. B. Armstrong, A, W. Cooper, G. H. Elkan, Joseph S. Kahn, Heinz Seltmann 
Research Associate: 

W. J. Dobrogosz 

The course program in the department has the objective of providing un- 
dergraduate and graduate instruction in the various specialized phases of 
basic plant science including microbiology. Undergraduates majoring in 
the department are usually oriented toward graduate work in this or 
other fields of science. Courses are supplemented by supervised programs 
of research for graduate students studying for master's or doctor's degrees. 
Course work in the department also is designed to provide a basis for study 
in the applied sciences in agriculture and forestry. 

Opportunities 

Majors in botany and bacteriology may choose to continue graduate 
work leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees 
in one of the several specialized fields. Majors specializing in botany are 
qualified for many technological positions with various government insti- 
tutions or private industries concerned with agriculture. Majors specializ- 
ing in bacteriology find employment opportunities in medical and agri- 
cultural industry or in the field of public health. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — Botany 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in the agricultural science 
curriculum from the School of Agriculture can be obtained in botany. For 
the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 54-56. The general 
requirements of the agricultural science curriculum are as follows: 



74 The General Catalog 

Group A Courses (25 Credits) 

Credits 

CH 103, General and Qualitative Chemistry 4 

•Electives (6 credits may be elected from Groups B and C) 21 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (27 Credits) 

CrediU 

BO 301, General Morphology 3 

BO 403, Systematic Botany 3 

BO 421, Plant Physiology 4 

BO 441, Plant Ecology 3 

GN 411, Principles of Genetics 3 

PP 315 or 318, Plant Diseases, Disease of Forest Trees 4 

BO 412, General Bacteriology r _ 4 

Elective 3 

Undergraduate Curriculum — Bacteriology 

The department does not offer an undergraduate major program in 
bacteriology, however, programs can be arranged to provide training that 
is well suited to prepare a student for graduate work in bacteriology or 
microbiology or to seek employment as a bacteriologist. 

Anyone interested in undergraduate work emphasizing bacteriology 
should see a departmental adviser. 

Graduate Study 

Botany and bacteriology offer work leading to the Master of Science 
degree in the special fields of plant physiology, ecology, anatomy, morph- 
ology, bacteriology, and systematic botany. Graduate work in preparation 
for the Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered in the fields of plant physiol- 
ogy, plant ecology, systematic botany, bacteriology and morphology. 

Department of Crop Science 

Professor P. H. Harvey, Head of the Department 

Teaching and Research 

Professors: 

D. S. Chamblee, D. U. Gerstel, W. C. Gregory, G. L. Jones, K. R. Keller, G. C. Rung- 

MAN, R. L. LowoRN, T. J. Mann, P. A. Miller, R. P. Moore, J. C. Rice, J. A. Weybrew 
Associate Professors: 

C. A. Brim, J. W. Dudley, D. A. Emery, H, D. Gross, L. A. Jones, W. M. Lewis, F. W. 

McLaughlin, D. E. Moreland, L. L. Phillips, Luther Shaw, D. L. Thompson, D. H. 

Timothy, R. P. Upchurch 
Professor Emeritus: 

G. K. Middleton 
Assistant Professors: 

W. A. Cope, W. T. Fike, W. B. Gilbert, G. R. Gwynn, J. L. Hall, J. A. Lee, J. R. 

Mauney, D. a. Miller, C. F. Murphy, E. C. Sisler, D. C. Whitenberg 
Instructor: 

F. L. Selman 
Extension 

Professor E. R. Collins, In Charge of Agronomy Extension 
Professors: 

R. R. Bennett, S. H. Dobson, A. D. Stuart 



No more than 6 hours of Group A electives may be courses in the Department of Botany end Bacteriology. 



Agriculture 75 

Associate Professors: 

S. N. Hawks, Astor Perry 
Assistant Professors: 

C. T. Blake, D. M. Gossett, A. D. Worsham 
Intructor: 

W. G, TOOMEY 

The curriculum in crop science has as its objectives training the student in 
the fundamental principles of the plant sciences, along with the applica- 
tion of these principles to the problems of crop production. 

The importance of agronomic training in North Carolina agriculture is 
shown by the fact that the State ranks third among the states in cash in- 
come from farm crops. Yet the maximum potential production of farm 
crops has by no means been reached. With continued improvement in 
varieties, cultural practices and cropping methods, further advances will 
be made. In carrying out this broad program there is, and will continue 
to be, a real need in North Carolina for men well trained in plant breed- 
ing, crop production and management and related fields. 

The Department of Crop Science is housed in Williams Hall. 

Opportunities 

Graduates in crop science are trained to fill positions as county extension 
agents; farm operators and managers; salesmen in seed and fertilizer com- 
panies and similar commercial concerns; seed analysts; and as leaders in 
various forms of agricultural development work. The crop science pro- 
grams also oflEer training for those students who might want to continue 
their education with graduate study in preparation for extension, teaching 
or research positions with state or Federal institutions or private industry. 

Undergraduate Curriculum 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in crop science can be 
earned under any of the three curricula in the School of Agriculture. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 54-56. 

Agricultural Business— The requirements of the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows: 



Group B Courses (24 Credits) 



Credits 



AGC 303, Organization and Business Management of Farms 3 

AGC 311, Organization and Business Management of Marketing Firms 3 

EC 407, Buisiness Law I 3 

Electives 15 



Group A and C Courses (5 Credits) 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

Elective _- 2 



76 The General Catalog 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 

CS 211. Crop Science 3 

CS 312, Pastures and Forage Crops 3 

CS 414. Weeds and Their Control 3 

BO 421, Plant Physiology 4 

ENT 312, Economic Entomology 3 

PP 315. Plant Diseases 3 

SSC 200, Soils 4 

SSC 302. Soils and Plant Growth 

or 
SSC 341, Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

Agricultural Science— The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 

Group A Courses (25 Credits) 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

PP 315. Plant Diseases 3 

MA 201, Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 4 

or 

MA 211, Analytic Geometry and Calculus B 3 

•Electives 11 or 12 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 

Credits 

CS 211, Crop Science 3 

CS 312, Pastures and Forage Crops 3 

CS 414. Weeds and Their Control 3 

BO 421. Plant Physiology 4 

ENT 312. Economic Entomology 3 

SSC 200. Soils . 4 

SSC 302, Soils and Plant Growth 
or 

SSC 341, Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

Elective 3 

Agricultural Technology— The requirements of the agricultural tech- 
nology curriculum are as follows: 

Group A ond B Courses (8-11 Credits) 

Credits 

GN 411. The Principles of Genetics 3 

PP 315, Plant Diseases 3 

Electives . — 2-5 

Group C Courses (9-12 Credits) 
Electives 9-12 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (27 Credits) 

CS 211, Crop Science 3 

CS 311, Field Crops II . . 3 

CS 312, Pastures and Forage Crops 3 

CS 413. Plant Breeding 3 

CS 414, Weeds and Their Control 3 

BO 421, Plant Physiology 4 

ENT 312. Economic Entomology 3 

SSC 302. Soils and Plant Growth 
or 

SSC 341, Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

Electives 2 



* Six credits may be elected from Groups B and C. 



Agriculture 77 

The Departments of Crop Science, Entomology, and Plant Pathology 
oflFer a joint major in plant protection. See section on plant protection for 
details. 

Graduate Study 

The Department of Crop Science offers training leading to the degrees 
of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the following fields: 
plant breeding, crop production, forage crop ecology, and weed control. 



Dairy Husbandry 

See Animal Science 



Department of Entomology 



Professor Clyde F. Smith, Head of the Department 
Teaching and Research 
Professor Emeritus: 

T. B. Mitchell 
Professors: 

C. H. Brett, F. E. Guthrde, D. A. Young, Jr. 
Associate Professors: 

W, V. Campbell, M. H. Farrier, W. J. Mistric, R. L. Rabb 
Assistant Professors: 

R. C. Axtell, W. C. Dauterman, E. Hodgson, H. H. Neunzig 
Instructors: 

M, D. Jackson, H. B. Moore, D. A, Mount 
Research 
Assistant Professors: 

R. B. Chalfant, G. F. Turnipseed 
Extension 
Professor: 

G. D. Jones 
Assistant Professor: 

R. L. Robertson 
Teaching and Extension 
Assistant Professor: 

W. A. Stephen 

The entomology faculty ofiEers instruction at both the undergraduate and 
graduate levels and provides students in this field the broad fundamental 
training necessary in this profession. Undergraduate instruction also is 
designed to provide introductory and terminal courses in insect control 
technology for students majoring in other areas of agriculture and forestry. 
The Department of Entomology is housed in Gardner Hall. 

Opportunities 

Opportunities for employment of well-trained entomologists are plenti- 
ful and varied. Research and teaching opportunities exist in many state 
institutions. Federal agencies offer many positions in research and regula- 
tory work. Private industry is using more and more entomologists in the 



The General Catalog 



development, production, control, testing and sale of agricultural chem- 
icals. Other opportunities in entomology as consultants in domestic or 
foreign service as well as in private business and sales are available. One 
can go into business for himself as a pest control operator or an insecticide 
formulator. 



Undergraduate Curriculum 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in entomology is offered 
under the agricultural science curriculum of the School of Agriculture. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 54-55. 

Agricultural Science— "The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 



Group A Courses (26 or 28 Credits) 

Credits 

SSC 200, Soils — 4 

or or 

MIG 120, Geology S 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 

GN 411, Principles of Genetics . $ 

CH 351, Introductory Biochemistry, or Equivalent i 

ST 311, Introduction to Statistics . 3 

BO 421, Plant Physiology 4 

or or 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 3 

ZO 205, Invertebrate Zoology 4 

•Elective 3 



Departmental Requirements and Electives (20 Credits) 

ENT 312, Economic Entomology 
or 

ENT 301, General Entomology 3 

ENT 511, Systematic Entomology 3 

Advised Electives 14 

Agricultural Techjiology— The Departments of Crop Science, Entomol- 
ogy, and Plant Pathology offer a joint major in plant protection. See sec- 
tion on plant protection for details. 

Graduate Study 

The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered in 
entomology. The work in entomology is well supported by strong De- 
partments in Chemistry, Statistics, and the Plant and Animal Sciences. 



" May be taken from Groups B and C. 



Agriculture 79 

Department of Food Science 

Professor W. M. Roberts, Head of the Department 

Teaching and Research 

Professors: 

L. W. AuRAND, T, N. Blumer, J. L. Etchells, W. M. Hoover, I. D. Jones, M. L. Speck 
Associate Professors: 

T. A. Bell, D. Fromm, F. G. Warren 
Assistant Professors: 

H. B. Craig, M. E. Gregory, V. A. Jones 
Instructor: 

C. W. Dill 
Extension 
Professor: 

J. A. Christian 
Associate Professor: 

F. B. Thomas 
Instructor: 

J. F. Wiles 

The Department of Food Science has the objectives of providing under- 
graduate and graduate programs for the application and coordination of 
basic training in the physical and biological sciences, economics and en- 
gineering to the development, processing, packaging, quality control, dis- 
tribution and utilization of foods. 

The department maintains modem and fully-equipped laboratories for 
teaching and research programs in dairy, fruit, meat, poultry, seafood, and 
vegetable products. 

The department head and several stafiF members of the Department of 
Food Science are housed in Polk Hall. Other staff members and teaching 
and research facilities are housed in Kilgore and Scott Halls. 

Opportunities 

The increasing consumer demands for greater varieties and quantities 
of highly nutritious and convenience foods of uniformly high quality 
create many and varied career opportunities in the food and allied indus- 
tries for qualified personnel. 

Specific job opportunities in the food industries are procurement, pro- 
cessing, management, quality control, research and development, distri- 
bution, sales and merchandising. Some of the job opportunities in allied 
industries include sales and service representatives of companies manu- 
facturing equipment and supplies for the food industries, consulting ac- 
tivities and trade association promotional and educational services. 

Food scientists hold educational and regulatory positions in extension 
service, inspection, grading, research and development and quality control 
of foods with various State and Federal governmental agencies. Food sci- 
entists are in demand for teaching and research positions with colleges 
and universities. 



80 The General Catalog 

Undergraduate Curriculum 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in food science and 
processing can be earned under any of the three curricula in the School 
of Agriculture. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 54-56, 

Agricultural Business— The requirements of the Agricultural Business 
curriculum are as follows: 

Group A Courses (8 Credits) 

Credits 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 

CH 103, General Chemistry II 4 

Group B Courses (24 Credits) 

Electives 24 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (23 Credits) 

FS 301, Food Composition . S 

FS 331, Food Engineering . __ 3 

FS 505, Food Microbiology . . 3 

FS 511, Food Science Seminar . 1 

Electives ^-_ 13 

Agricultural Science— The requirements of the Agricultural Science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 

Group A Courses (25 Credits) 

Credits 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 

CH 221, Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 215, Quantitative Analysis — — . 4 

CH 351, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

Electives 10 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 

FS 331, Food Engineering 3 

FS 502, Food Chemistry . 3 

FS 505, Food Microbiology __._ 3 

FS 511, Food Science Seminar 1 

Electives — 16 

Agricultural Technology— The requirements of the Agricultural Tech- 
nology curriculum are as follows: 

Group A Courses (12 Credits) 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 

CH 221, Organic Chemistry I . 4 

CH 215, Quantitative Analysis 4 



Group C Courses (9 Credits) 



Electives 



Departmental Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 

CH 351, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

FS 331, Food Engineering 3 

FS 502, Food Chemistry 3 

FS 505, Microbiology . 3 

FS 511, Food Science Seminar . 1 

Electives - 13 



Agriculture 81 

Graduote Study 

The Department of Food Science offers graduate programs of study 
leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Corol- 
lary instruction is provided in the biological and physical sciences. Areas 
of study and research include: (1) food chemistry; (2) food microbiology, 
and (3) food process and product development. These areas comprise all 
foods including dairy, fruit, meat, poultry, seafood, and vegetable products. 



Departmenf- of Genetics 

Professor H. F. Robinson, Head of the Department 

Teaching and Research 

Professors: 

C. H. Bostian, D. S. Grosch, W. D. Hanson, Ben W. Smith, S. G. Stephens 
Associate Professors: 

Ken-Ichi Kojima, D. F. Matzinger, R. H, Moll 
Assistant Professors: 

F. B. Armstrong, L. E. Mettler 
Associate Geneticist: 

M. Pfluge Gregory 
Research Assistant Professor: 

Wilfred Smrrz 
Cooperating with the following associate members of the faculty: 
Animal Science: 

D. U. DiLLARD, J. E. Legates, O. W. Robison, H. A. Stewart 
Botany: 

E. O. Beal, J. W. Hardin 
Crop Science: 

P. H. Harvey. C. A. Brim, W. A. Cope, J. W. Dudley, D. A. Emery, D. U. Gerstel. W. C. 
Gregory, G. L. Jones, K. R. Keller, J. A. Lee, W. M. Lewis, T. J. Mann, P. A. Miller, 
L. L. Phillips, D. L. Thompson, D. H. Timothy 
Horticultural Science: 

F. D. Cochran, G. J. Galletta, F. L. Haynes, W. R. Henderson, D. T. Pope 
Plant Pathology: 

J. L. Apple, Richard Gwyn, T. T. Hebert, E. L. Moore, R. R. Nelson, N. N. Winstead 
Poultry Science: 

E. W. Glazener. W. L. Blow, G. A. Martin 
Forestry: 

T. O. Perry, B. J. Zobel 
Statistics: 

C. Clark Cockerham, J. O. Rawlings 

The genetics faculty offers instruction at advanced undergraduate and 
graduate levels. The undergraduate courses are designed to support the 
other departments of the institution, giving students a background in the 
science of genetics. The graduate program is designed to train scientists 
for research and teaching careers in basic genetics and in its applications in 
plant and animal breeding. 

The Department of Genetics is housed in Gardner Hall. 

Undergraduate Curriculum 

The department does not have a program leading to a Bachelor of Science 
degree. 



82 The General Catalog 

Graduate Study 

Graduate study is carried out under the direction of the members of 
the genetics faculty and enables the student to qualify for the Master of 
Science or the Doctor of Philosophy degree. A candidate for the master's 
degree must acquire a thorough understanding of genetics and its relation 
to other biological disciplines and must present a thesis based upon his 
own research. In addition to a comprehensive knowledge of his field, a 
candidate for the doctorate must demonstrate his capacity for independent 
investigation and scholarship in genetics. 

The basic aspects of quantitative genetics, cytogenetics, physiological 
genetics and mutation genetics as related to past and future evolution of 
organisms is the central theme of the training program and research. Pro- 
grams of research in biochemical genetics utilize microorganisms in the 
basic studies of genetic phenomena and gene action. The varied but 
coordinated interests of the genetics faculty with their research programs 
offer a variety of opportunities for graduate student training that is found 
at few other institutions. Experimental studies utilize organisms ranging 
from microbes, mice and drosophila to trees and economic farm animals. 

Department of Horticultural Science 

Professor Fred D. Cochran, Head of the Department 

Teaching and Research 

Professors: 

M. E. Gardner, F. L, Haynes, Jr., J. M. Jenkins, Jr., D. T. Pope, G. O. Randall 
Associate Professors: 

W. E. Ballincer, L. K. Kushman, C. L. McCombs, C. H. Miller 
Assistant Professors: 

T. F. Cannon, F. E. Correll, A. S. Fish, G. J. Galletta, W. R. Henderson, T. R. Kon- 

SLER, R. A. Larson, D. C. Zeicer 
Instructor: 

V. H. Underwood 
Extension 

Professor J. H. Harris, In Charge 
Professors: 

A. A. Banadyga, H. M. Covington, M. H. Kolbe 
Associate Professor: 

B. L. James 

The undergraduate programs in horticultural science offer broad training 
in the physical and biological sciences and business, as well as a sound 
cultural background, to prepare students for graduate study or for diverse 
professional services in the fruit and vegetable crops field, in floriculture, 
and in nursery management and landscape horticulture. 

The varied climatic conditions in North Carolina make possible the 
production of a wide variety of horticultural crops commercially, as well 
as in parks and gardens. While these crops now represent an important 
segment of agriculture in North Carolina, further expansion will be re- 
alized with the development of adapted varieties, mechanization and in- 
tensification of cultural practices, improvement of handling and marketing 
methods, and development of the food processing industry. 



Agriculture 83 

Opportunities 

Graduates in horticulture will find numerous opportunities in a wide 
variety of positions in production, processing, sales, and service. Among 
these are county extension agents; landscaping and landscape contracting; 
farm operators; orchard, nursery, greenhouse and flower shop managers; 
research, production, and promotional specialists with commercial seed, 
floral, fertilizer, chemical, and food companies; inspectors and quality 
control technologists; USD A specialists; and as leaders in other phases of 
agricultural and industrial developments. In addition, the student may 
prepare himself for one of the many opportunities for graduate study. 

Undergraduate Curriculum 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in horticultural science 
can be earned in either of the three curricula . . . business, science, or 
technology . . . offered by the School of Agriculture. Under these curricula, 
specialized training is offered for horticultural science majors in fruit and 
vegetable crops, and in floriculture, nursery management, and landscape 
horticulture. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 54-56. 

Agricultural Business— The requirements of the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows: 

Group B Courses (24 Credits) 

Credits 
Electives 24 

Group A and C Courses (6 Credits) 

ENT 312, Economic Entomology . S 

PP 315, Plant Diseases S 

Deportmentol Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 

SSC 200. Soils 4 

For majors in Fruit and Vegetable Crops 

HS 421, Fruit Production S 

HS 432, Vegetable Production . ._ 8 

HS 562. Post- Harvest Physiology 3 

Electives 13 

For majors in Floriculture, Nursery Management and Landscape Horti- 
culture 

Credits 

HS 211, 212, Ornamental Plants 6 

HS 301. Plant Propagation 3 

HS 351, 441, 442, Greenhouse Management, Floriculture I and II 
or 

HS 342, 411, 471, Landscape Gardening. Nursery Management, Arboriculture 9 

Electives 4 

Agricultural Science— "The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows for specialization in fruit and vegetable crops and 
ornamental crops: 



84 



The General Catalog 



Group A Courses (26 Credits) 



BO 412, General Bacteriology 
BO 421, Plant Physiology 



CH 103, General and Qualitative Chemistry 

GN 411, Principles of Genetics 

SSC 200, Soils 



Electives 



Deportmenhil Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 



Credits 

4 

4 

4 

__ 3 

4 

7 



ENT 312, Economic Entomology 
PP 315, Plant Diseases 



Credits 

S 

3 



For majors in Fruit and Vegetable Crops 



HS 421, Fruit Production 

HS 432, Vegtable Production 

HS 552, Growth of Horticultural Plants 

HS 562, Post-Harvest Physiology 

Electives 



Credits 

3 

3 

3 

3 

8 



For majors in Floriculture, Nursery Management, and Landscape Horti- 
culture 

Credits 



HS 211, 212, Ornamental Plants 

HS 441, 442, Floriculture I and II 

or 
HS 411, 471, Nursery Management; Arboriculture 
Electives 



Agricultural Technology— The requirements of the agricultural tech- 
nology curriculum are as follows: 



Group A and B Courses (10 Credits) 



BO 421, Plant Physiology 
GN 411, Genetics 



PP 315, Plant Diseases 



Credits 

4 

3 

3 



Group C Courses (1 1 Credits) 



SSC 341, Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 

HS 481, Breeding of Horticultural Plants 
Electives 



Departmental Requirements and Electives (27 Credits) 



Credit* 

3 

3 

5 



ENT 312, Economic Entomology 
Electives — 



Credits 

3 

6 



For Majors in Fruit and Vegetable Crops 



AGC 364, Marketing of Fruits and Vegetables 

HS 421, Fruit Production 

HS 432, Vegetable Production 

HS 552, Growth of Horticultural Plants 

HS 562, Post-Harvest Physiology 

Electives 



Credits 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 



Agriculture 85 

For majors in Floriculture, Nursery Management, and Landscape Horti- 
culture 

Credits 

HS 211, 212. Ornamental Plants 6 

HS 301, Plant Propagation S 

HS 351, 441, 442, Greenhouse Management; Floriculture I and II S 

or 
HS 342, 411, 471, Landscape Gardening, Nursery Management, Arboriculture 9 

Graduate Study 

The Department of Horticultural Science offers the Master of Science de- 
gree and the professional degree. Master of Horticulture. 

The professional degree is designed for those interested in application 
of current knowledge, while the Master of Science degree places emphasis 
on research and provides a basis for later study on the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. 



Departmenf of Plant Pathology 

Professor D. E. Ellis, Head of the Department 

Teaching and Research 

Professors: 

Robert Aycock, C. N. Clayton, F. A. Haasis, T. T. Hebert, A. Kelman, E. L. Moore, 

L. W. Nielsen, C. J. Nusbaum, N. N. Winstead 
Associate Professors: 

J. L. Apple, W. E. Cooper, D. M. Kline, G. B. Lucas, R. R. Nelson, L. H. Person, N. T. 

Powell, J. P. Ross, J. N. Sasser, R. T. Sherwood, Hedwig Triantaphyllou 
Assistant Professors: 

C. S. Hodges, D. L. Strider 
Extension 

Professor Howard R, Garriss, In Charge 
Professors: 

Furney a. Todd, J. C. Wells 

Undergraduate instruction in plant pathology is designed to provide in- 
troductory and advanced courses in the nature and control of plant diseases 
to students majoring in crop science, horticultural science, plant protec- 
tion, agricultural education, and forestry, and to provide students with 
the fundamental training necessary for graduate study in plant pathology. 

Opportunities 

Many opportunities for employment in research, extension and teaching 
arc available to men with advanced degrees in the field of plant pathology. 
Openings are available for qualified men in research in the USDA, state 
experiment stations, and in industry. The rapid development of agricul- 
tural chemicals and other methods for disease control offers numerous 
opportunities. See plant protection curriculum. 



86 The General Catalog 

Undergraduate Curriculum 

The Plant Pathology Department cooperates in the training of plant 
protection majors (see below), but does not offer a major in plant pathol- 
ogy at the undergraduate level. 

Graduate Study 

The Department of Plant Pathology offers graduate training in all 
phases of plant pathology leading to the degrees of Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

PLANT PROTECTION MAJOR 

The major in plant protection is a joint major in the Departments of 
Entomology, Crop Science, and Plant Pathology. 

Students in plant protection will be trained in the application of chemi- 
cal and biological principles for the control of plant diseases, insects, and 
weeds. Crop losses from insects, weeds, and diseases for the past several 
years have been estimated in excess of 10 billion dollars annually in the 
United States. A knowledge of the organisms to be controlled, the products 
to be used and the crops to be grown is basic to any control or regulatory 
program. 

Opportunities 

Opportunities in plant protection basically involve improving farm effi- 
ciency to meet our ever-growing need for food and fiber. About 340 chemi- 
cal companies are concerned with manufacturing and formulating products 
for pest control. Technically trained men are needed for sales development 
and promotion of agricultural chemicals. Graduates are also trained to fill 
positions as county extension agents or as state and Federal regulatory 
agents. This major is primarily intended for the Bachelor of Science degree. 
However, qualified students can go on to graduate school from this curric- 
ulum. 

Undergraduate Curriculum 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in plant protection is 
offered under the agricultural technology curriculum of the School of 
Agriculture. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 54-56. 

Agricultural Technology— The requirements of the agricultural tech- 
nology curriculum are as follows: 

Group A and B Courses (9-12 Credits) 

Credits 

CH 425, Organic Chemistry S 

CH 426, Organic Chemistry 
or 

CH 351, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics S 

Eleaives . 0-3 



Agriculture 87 

Group C Courses (9-12 Credits) 

CS 211, Crop Science ____^_ 3 

HS 201. Principles of Horticulture 3 

Electives 3-6 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (27 Credits) 

CrediU 

BO 421, Plant Physiology 4 

BO 412, General Bacteriology . . 4 

ENT 312, Economic Entomology 3 

Entomology Elective 3 

PP 315, Plant Diseases 3 

Plant Pathology Elective 3 

CS 414, Weeds and Their Control 5 

Electives 4 



Department- of Poultry Science 

Professor H. W. Garren, Head of the Department 

Teaching and Research 

Professors: 

C. W. Barber, F. R. Craig, E. W. Glazener, C. H. Hill, M. R. Rare 
Associate Professors: 

T. T. Brown, \V. L. Blow, J. \V. Kelly 
Assistant Professors: 

E. E. Bern.ard, F. \V. Cook, W. E. Donaldson, G. A. Martin 
Extension 

Professor C. F. Parrish, In Charge 
Professor: 

J. R. Harris 
Associate Professors: 

\\\ G. Andrews, H. L. Bumgardner, W. C. Mills, Jr., T. B. Morris 

The Department of Poultry Science provides training in the principles of 
poultry husbandry and in such related scientific fields as nutrition, genetics 
and physiology. 

Through teaching, research, and extension the department serves stu- 
dents, poultrymen, and allied industries. The production of poultry has 
expanded rapidly in recent years to become one of the most important 
commodities in North Carolina. 

The Department of Poultry Science is located in Scott Hall. 

Opportunities 

The expanding poultry industry in North Carolina and elsewhere has 
created more specialized positions than can be filled with the available 
poultry graduates. Job opportunities are varied, enabling the student to 
select the type of position having the greatest appeal to him. Graduates 
hold positions as managers and field representatives for feed manufac- 
turers, processors, hatcheries, equipment companies, biological supply 
houses, banks, and other allied industries. They also work in communi- 
cations and public relations and as teaching, extension and research special- 
ists. A number of graduates have established their own successful poultry 
businesses. 



88 The General Catalog 

Undergraduate Curriculum 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in poultry science can 
be obtained in any of the three curricula offered by the School of Agri- 
culture. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 54-56, 
Agricultural Business— The requirements of the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows: 



Group A and C Courses (8 Credits) 



Credits 

CH 103, General Chemistry II 4 

CH 220, Introductory Organic Chemistry 4 

Group B Courses (24 Credits) 

Electives 24 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (27 Credits) 

Credits 

PO 201, Poultry Production 4 

PO 301, Poultry Quality Evaluations 2 

PO 401, Poultry Diseases 4 

PO 402, Commercial Poultry Enterprises 4 

PO 403, Poultry Seminar 1 + 1 

PO 404, Poultry Products 3 

PO 521, Poultry Nutrition 3 

ZO 301. Animal Physiology 4 

Agricultural Science— The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 

Group A Courses (26 Credits) 

Credits 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 

CH 221, Organic Chemistry 4 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 4 

•Electives 11 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 

Credits 

PO 201, Poultry Production 4 

PO 401, Poultry Diseases 4 

PO 403, Poultry Seminar 1 + 1 

PO 404, Poultry Products 3 

PO 520, Poultry Breeding 3 

PO 521, Poultry Nutrition _. 3 

PO 522, Endocrinology of the Fowl 3 

ZO 561, Animal Embryology 4 

Agricultural Technology— The requirements of the agricultural tech- 
nology curriculum are as follows: 

Group A ond B Courses (15 Credits) 

Credits 
CH 220, Introductory Organic Chemistry 
or 

CH 221. Organic Chemistry 4 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 4 

GN 411. The Principles of Genetics 3 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 



Six credit* may be elected from Groups B ond C. 



Agriculture 89 

Group C Courses (10 Credits) 

Credits 
Electives 10 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (25 Credits) 

PO 201, Poultry Production 4 

PO 301, Poultry Quality Evaluations 2 

PO 401, Poultry Diseases 4 

PO 402, Commercial Poultry Enterprises 4 

PO 403, Poultry Seminar 1 + 1 

PO 404, Poultry Products 3 

PO 520, Poultry Breeding 3 

PO 521, Poultry Nutrition 8 

Graduate Study 

An extensive research program is found in the Department of Poultry 
Science. Graduate training is available in nutrition, physiology, and gene- 
tics. If the student desires, a research problem can be developed in one of 
these areas with disease as an additional consideration. This department 
houses one of the foremost laboratories in the country devoted to the 
nutritional aspects of disease resistance and susceptibility. In the physiol- 
ogy area is found the leading laboratory in this country for studying the 
mechanism of taste in domestic animals. The genetics area enjoys a na- 
tional reputation for its outstanding contributions to the science of poultry 
genetics. Graduate study can be developed in either physiological or 
population genetics. 

PRE-VETERINARY 

A pre-veterinary curriculum is offered as part of a working agreement 
with two Southern veterinary colleges. After the completion of the pre- 
scribed work, eight North Carolina students are selected each year to 
attend the University of Georgia and six to attend the Veterinary College 
at Oklahoma State University at in-state rather than out-of-state tuition 
rates. 

The first year's work (up to 42 credits) at either Georgia or Oklahoma 
may be transferred back to North Carolina State College and counted 
toward graduation requirements for a Bachelor of Science degree from 
State College in zoology, animal industry, or poultry science if three years 
were spent in pre-veterinary curriculum. 

Curriculum 

The pre-veterinary program is offered under the agricultural science 
curriculum of the School of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Science— The courses listed below are minimum require- 
ments for all students applying for entrance to veterinary school under 
the Southern Regional Education Board contract. Only these students 
who complete the required courses successfully (grade C or better on 
each) will be considered eligible to apply. An over-all 2.50 scholastic 
average or better is mandatory for application to Oklahoma State Uni- 
versity. 



90 The General Catalog 

Longuages (9 Credits) 



Credits 



ENG 111, 112. English Composirion 6 

English Elective 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities (6 Credits) 

HI 261, The U. S. in Western Civilization 3 

PS 201, American Government System 3 

Physical and Biological Sciences (41 to 44 Credits) 

MA 111, 112, Algebra and Trigonometry; Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 8 

CH 101, 103, General Inorganic Chemistry; General and Qualitative Chemistry 8 

CH 221. 223, Organic Chemistry I and II 8 

PY 211, 212, General Physics 8 

or or 

PY 221, College Physics 5 

BO 103, General Botany 4 

ZO 103, General Zoology 4 

ZO 223, Comparative Anatomy . 4 

Group C Courses (12 Credits) 

ANS 201, Elements of Dairy Science 4 

ANS 202, Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 4 

PO 201, Poultry Production 4 



Deparfmenf of Rural Sociology 

Professor Selz C. Mayo, Head of the Department 
Teaching and Research 
Reynolds Professor: 

C. Horace HAMn.TON 
Associate Professor: 

Glenn C. McCann 
Assistant Professor: 

James N. Young 
Extension 

Professor John W. Crawford, In Charge of Community Development 
Associate Professor: 

C. Paul Marsh 
Assistant Professors: 

Thomas N. Hobgood, Robert W. Long 
Instructors: 

John N. Collins, Jane U. Norwood 

The principal aim of this department is to teach students the principles 
and techniques for understanding human group behavior. More specifi- 
cally the department seeks: (1) to train students to become leaders in 
organizing rural groups and communities and in administering their pro- 
grams; (2) to qualify exceptional students on the undergraduate and 
graduate levels for rural sociological research, teaching and extension work; 
(3) to solve problems in human group relations through scientific research; 
and (4) to extend research results to the people of the State. 

The Department of Rural Sociology is housed in the 1911 Building. 



Agriculture 91 

Opportunities 

Graduates of this department may obtain employment as community 
organization specialists, county agents, social welfare workers, social statis- 
ticians, administrators and managers of both public and private social 
agencies, college teachers, research workers and many other capacities. 

Among the institutions offering employment to graduates are land-grant 
colleges, agricultural experiment stations, and extension services; the 
United States Departments of Agriculture, State, and Health Education 
and Welfare; state departments of welfare, health and education; farm 
journals and newspapers; voluntary social agencies, such as Red Cross, 
Community Chest, and Boy Scouts; and rural fraternal organizations, and 
cooperatives. The range of vocational pursuits open to rural sociology 
graduates is constantly widening. 

Undergraduate Curriculum 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in rural sociology is 
offered under the agricultural science curriculum of the School of Agri- 
culture. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 54-55. 

Agricultural Science— The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 



Group A Courses (26 Credits) 

Credits 

ST Sll, Introduction to Statistics 8 

GN 411, Principles of Genetics 
or 

GN 301, Genetics in Human Affairs 8 

MIG 120, Physical Geology 3 

•Electives 17 



Departmentol Requirements ond Electives (26 Credits) 



Credits 



SOC 202, Principles of Sociology 5 

RS SOI, Sociology of Rural Life 3 

SOC 301, Human Behavior — 3 

ANT 252. Cultural Anthropology 3 

RS 321, Introduction to Social Research 

or 

SOC 416, Research Methods 3 

RS 442, Rural Social Structure 

or 
SOC 511. Social Theory ' 



Electives 



8 



Graduate Study 

The Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered 
by this department. Graduate students studying for the Doctor of Philoso- 

• Six credits may be •lected from Groups B and C. Additional electives may be chosen from Group D. 



92 The General Catalog 

phy degree are required to take approximately 15 semester hours in the 
Department of Sociology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. 
Students seeking the Master of Science degree may take courses at Chapel 
Hill, but normally will be able to complete their entire programs at State 
College. 

Advanced work in rural sociology provides training in a number of social 
sciences and prepares the graduate student for a wide variety of positions. 



Department- of Soil Science 

Professor James Walter Frrrs, Head of the Department 

Teaching and Research 

Professors: 

William Victor Bartholomew, James Fulton Lutz, Ralph Joseph McCracken, Willie 

Garland Woltz, Willl\m Walton Woodhouse, Jr. 
Associate Professors: 

Ch.\rles B. Davey, Homer Clifton Folks, Willl\m Awjison Jackson, Eugene John Kam- 

prath, Charles Bernard McCants, James Rodney Piland, Preston Harding Reid, James 

Maurice Spain, Richard James Volk, Sterling Barc Weed, Sanford Eugene Younts 
Assistant Professors: 

Maurice Gayle Cook, Frederick Russell Cox, Doris Lee Craig, George August Cum- 

MiNGS, Eugene Frizzelle Goldston, Robert Edmund McCollum, Raymond J. Miller, 

James Edward Shelton 
Instructors: 

Carlos Path. Bickford, Charles Bennett England, Ralph Avery Leonard 
Extension 

Professor Emerson R. Collins, In Charge of Agronomy 
Assistant Professor: 

William Calvin White 
Assistant Professors: 

J. Frank Doccett, Clifford K. Martin 

The primary objective of the Department of Soil Science is to train stu- 
dents in the fundamental principles of soils, their utilization and manage- 
ment. Soils constitute one of the largest capital investments in farming and 
proper soil management is essential for efficient production. Therefore, the 
demand by educational; research and service agencies and by industry for 
men trained in soils should continue to be great. 

The Department of Soil Science is housed in Williams Hall. 

Opportunities 

Soil Science graduates are trained to fill positions of leadership in many 
areas of agricultural work, such as county extension agents; farm operators 
and managers; soil conservation service representatives; technicians or sales- 
men in fertilizer companies. Provision is also made for those students who 
wish to obtain a more thorough training in mathematics, chemistry, phys- 
ics, and biological sciences in anticipation of graduate study. Students with 
advanced degrees have unlimited opportunities in teaching, research, and 
extension with state and federal institutions as well as increasing oppor- 
tunities with commercial concerns. 



Agriculture 93 

Undergraduate Curriculum 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in soil science is offered 
under all three of the curricula in the School of Agriculture. 
For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 54-56. 

Agricultural Business— The requirements of the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows: 

Group B Courses (24 Credits) 

Credits 
Electives 24 

Group A ond C Courses (6 Credits) 

Electives — _ — _ 6 

Departmental Requirements ond Electives (26 Credits) 

MIG 120, Physical Geology S 

SSC 200, Soils 4 

SSC 341, Soil Fertility and Fertilizers i 

SSC 302, Soils and Plant Growth 5 

SSC 480, Senior Seminar 1 

SSC 461, Soil Conservation and Management S 

SSC 452. Soil Qassification 5 

Electives — _ — ——— 6 

Agricultural Science— The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 

Group A Courses (26 Credits) 

Credits 

MA 201, Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 4 

MA 202, Analytic Geometry and Calculus 11 4 

MIG 120, Physical Geology 3 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 

BO 421, Plant Physiology 4 

PY 212, General Physics — 4 

•Elective — - — 3 

Deportmental Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 

Credits 

CH Chemistry _____ 12 

SSC 200, Soils ___ — — 4 

SSC 480, Senior Seminar ■ 1 

SSC 341, Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

SSC 302, Soils and Plant Growth — — 5 

Select two of the following courses: 

SSC 461, Soils Conservation and Management 5 

SSC 452, Soil Classification — 3 

Agricultural Technology— The requirements of the agricultural tech- 
nology curriculum are as follows: 

Group A and B Courses (9-12 Credits) 

Credits 

Elec ti ves ^ ^ 2 



May be elected from Groups B and C. 



94 The General Catalog 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (27 Credits) 

Credits 

MIG 120, Physical Geology 3 

BO 412, General Bacteriology 4 

BO 421, Plant Physiology 4 

SSC 341, Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 5 

SSC 302, Soils and Plant Growth 3 

SSC 480, Senior Seminar —— 1 

SSC 461, Soil Conservation and Management 3 

SSC 452, Soil Classification 3 

Elective From Group A or B 3 

Graduate Study 

The Department of Soil Science offers training leading to the degrees 
of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the following fields: soil 
chemistry, soil fertility, soil physics, soil genesis and soil microbiology. 



Department of Zoology 

Professor F. S. Barkalow, Jr., Head of the Department 

Teaching and Research 

Professors: 

R. Harkema, M. R. Kare, T. L. Quay, R. W. Stacy 
Associate Professors: 

W. W. Hasslxr, G. C. Miller, J. A. Santolucito 
Assistant Professors: 

C. W. Alliston, F. E. Hester 
Instructors: 

Georgette Campbell, F. L. Roberts 
Extension 
Assistant Professor H. M. Fields, In Charge of Wildlife 

The Department of Zoology at North Carolina State is organized to serve 
three purposes: (1) it serves the Schools of Agriculture, Forestry, and Edu- 
cation by teaching courses of a fundamental nature essential to a complete 
understanding and mastery of applied science; (2) it provides training in 
zoology which prepares students for positions in industrial and govern- 
mental laboratories; (3) it provides undergraduate curricula leading to 
graduate and professional training in dentistry, medicine, veterinary med- 
icine, and advanced zoological sciences; (4) it furnishes potential leaders 
in the field of wildlife conservation and game management through a cur- 
riculum in wildlife biology. 

The Department of Zoology is housed in Gardner Hall. 

Opportunities 

The zoology program is sufficiently flexible to provide the basic training 
for students who wish to continue their education at the graduate level, or 
its equivalent. 

Five categories of positions are available to wildlife graduates: admin- 
istrative, law enforcement, refuge, education, and research. Agencies em- 
ploying the majority of trained men are state game and fish departments. 



Agriculture 95 

U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U. S. Forest Service, U. S. Soil Conser- 
vation Service, U. S. National Park Service, Pure Food and Drug Admin- 
istration, and other Federal land-use departments. 

Employment opportunities continue to be good, especially at the gradu- 
ate level. No excess of wildlife graduates is anticipated in the immediate 
future. 

Unusual advantages are offered by the wide range of natural environ- 
ments in North Carolina's Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and mountain regions. 
Close cooperation with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission 
provides opportunities for observing developments in wildlife manage- 
ment on its 27 wildlife management and refuge areas. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — Wildlife Biology 

The Department of Zoology offers the degree of Bachelor of Science with 
a major in wildlife biology under the School of Agriculture's agricultural 
science curriculum. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 54-55. 

Agricultural Science— The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 

Language (3 Credits) 
ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills S 

Group A Courses (21-24 Credits) 

ZO 205, Invertebrate Zoology 4 

ZO 206, Vertebrate Zoology 4 

One course in Botany 2 or 3 

One course in Entomology . 3 

One course in Organic Chemistry 3 

Electives (from Botany, Chemistry, Soil Science, Geology, Entomology, Genetics, 

Mathematics and /or Statistics) — 2 or 4 

•Electives . S 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (29 Credits) 

ZO 223, Comparative Anatomy . 4 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 4 

ZO 321, Wildlife and Natural Resource Conservation 3 

ZO 522, Animal Ecology _.__ 3 

ZO 520, Fishery Science . 3 

ZO 551, Wildlife Science 3 

ZO 521, Fishery Science 
or 

ZO 552, Wildlife Science 8 

Advised Electives 6 

Undergraduate Curriculum — Zoology 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in zoology is offered 
under the agricultural science curriculum. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 54 and 55. 

Agricultural Science— The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 



* May be elected from Groups B and C. 



96 The General Catalog 

Languages (3 Credits) 

Credits 
ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 3 

Group A Courses (26 Credits) 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology __ 4 

ZO 223, Comparative Anatomy 4 

Restricted Electives from Group A __.. 12 

Restricted Electives from Groups A, B, and /or C . 6 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (26 Credits) 

Advised electives (two courses must be in Zoology) 26 

Graduate Study 

The Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered 
in animal ecology and wildlife biology. Graduate programs leading to 
advanced degrees in the areas of animal parasitology and physiology can 
be arranged in cooperation with the Department of Zoology of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Graduate programs are offered which 
include course work at Duke University and at the Duke Marine Labora- 
tory. 

The North Caroh'na Agricultural Institute 

H. BROOKS JAMES, Dean of Agriculture 

EDWARD W. GLAZENER, Director of Instruction 

HOMER C. FOLKS, Assistant Director of Instruction and Director of the Agriculturol Institute 

A two year program in agriculture was approved and money was appro- 
priated for this purpose by the 1959 General Assembly. Through action of 
the Board of Trustees of the Greater University, this two year program 
was named the North Carolina Agricultural Institute and was approved 
for operation on the North Carolina State College campus. 

The major objective of the Agricultural Institute is to provide technical 
training to the individual so that he may become more productive in our 
agricultural society. Specifically, instruction offered by the Agricultural 
Institute is designed to train men and women for those jobs in agriculture 
that require technicians with education beyond the high school level. An 
individual with this type of training should have a better income, assume 
a more prominent role of leadership, and become an asset to agriculture 
and to his community. 

The instructional programs of the Agricultural Institute are organized 
and conducted as part of the School of Agxiculture's over-all resident in- 
struction program. The Institute is an addition to, and not a substitute 
for, the regular degree-granting program of the School of Agriculture. 
However, in order to provide students enrolled in the Institute with the 
best possible technical training, the faculty in residence for the four year 
program is responsible for organizing and teaching courses offered by the 
Institute. 



Agricultlre 97 

People who have training similar to that which can be obtained in the 
courses offered in the Agricultural Institute are in great demand by agri- 
cultural industries. As this demand changes, new courses of study will be 
organized. Also, programs no longer needed will be dropped. Only through 
such a system of addition and deletion can the Agricultural Institute meet 
the needs for technically trained people in North Carolina. 

Opportunities for Graduates 

Rapid technical advancement has been extremely important in chang- 
ing agriculture from a small production industry to one of the largest 
industries in the nation. Today the farmer uses scientifically developed 
seed, feed, fertilizer; does most of his work with machinery and has scien- 
tific testing to back up his management decisions. Increased production 
has allowed him to sell much of his production rather than just the sur- 
plus above home consumption. Farms have become larger due to these 
technological advances and large amounts of capital are needed to operate 
successfully. All of these factors bring about dependence on outside sources 
of information and capital for success in a modem agricultural business. 

Not only the person who farms, but the hundreds of related businesses 
that are a vital part of agriculture today can not operate successfully with- 
out men trained in technical skills. 

Entrance Requirements 

Any individual who has received a diploma from an accredited high 
school or has passed the high school equivalency examination administered 
by the State Department of Public Instruction is eligible for entry into 
the Agricultural Institute. Each application will be reviewed and evaluated 
by the Institute director before an applicant ^sill be accepted. 

Program of Study 

The seven programs of study offered are farm machinery sales and 
service, general agriculture, livestock management and technology, poultry 
technology, pest control, ornamental crops technology, and field crop 
technology. 



The Agricultural Experiment Station 

H. BROOKS JAMES, Dean of Agriculture 
R. L LOVVORN, Director of Research 

The Agricultural Experiment Station was established in accordance with 
an act of the General Assembly of 1877 and amended in 1955. The 
North Carolina General Assembly has allocated to the Station, annually, 
certain funds from the General Fund. 

The purpose of the Agricultural Experiment Station is to study the basic 
laws of nature underlying agricultural enterprises and to develop methods 



98 The General Catalog 

for economic production of the highest grades of livestock, poultry, and 
plants on the many soil types and under the varied conditions existing in 
North Carolina; to study methods for the control of parasitic insects and 
organisms that cause serious economic losses of animals, poultry, and 
plants; to find and develop varieties of animals, poultry, and plants new 
and resistant to diseases and the changeable conditions prevailing in the 
State; and to perfect better marketing for all agricultural products. 

The staff of the Experiment Station conducts experiments in the green- 
house and laboratories of the College and throughout the State on areas 
owned by farmers on 16 strategically located experimental farms and on 
farms rented for short periods. 

The agricultural research aims, through the discovery of new facts, to 
improve the well-being of farmers throughout the State; to strengthen the 
regulatory work of the State Department of Agriculture; to develop new 
and necessary facts for the teaching of sound agricultural principles by 
vocational agricultural instructors, agricultural extension agents, and agri- 
cultural instructors in the College. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station staff brings to the College many 
experts, whose teaching in many specialized fields of agriculture assures 
the maintenance of curricula of high standards. It contributes much to the 
advanced training of students who are destined to become the leaders, 
teachers, and investigators necessary in the maintenance of agriculture 
on sound and economic planes. 

Publications 

The Agricultural Experiment Station publishes many bulletins and 
scientific papers on results of research conducted by the staff. These are 
free and are sent upon request to anyone in the State. 

Services 

The staff diagnoses and interprets many problems for the farmers of 
North Carolina. It holds council with farmers and others interested in the 
agricultural industry, presents radio programs devoted to the discussion 
of farming procedures, and writes many letters on more specific problems 
of agriculture at the request of farmers, members of garden clubs, and 
manufacturers of fertilizer, fungicides and insecticides. It also takes part 
in many of the administrative functions of the College. 

Cooperafriye Agricultural Extension Work 

H. BROOKS JAMES, Dean of Agriculture 
R. W. SHOFFNER, Director of Extension 
I. O. SCHAUB, Director Emeritus of Extension 
DAVID S. WEAVER, Director Emeritus of Extension 

The Agricultural Extension Service of State College is conducted co- 
operatively with the United States Department of Agriculture and with 
the one hundred counties in North Carolina. Its work is supported by 



Agriculture 99 

federal funds derived from the Smith-Lever Act of 1914, the Capper- 
Ketcham Act of 1928, the Bankhead-Jones Act of 1935, the Bankhead- 
Flannagan Act of 1945, and by State and county appropriations. Federal 
and State appropriations are used to maintain an administrative and 
specialist staff and to supplement salaries and travel expenses of county 
extension agents, who are located at each county seat in the State. 

Objectives 

The purpose of the Extension Sersice is to take to the rural people of 
North Carolina the latest and best information obtainable for building 
a more prosperous and satisfying life on the farm. In carrying out this 
purpose, the College maintains a staff of trained specialists, a system of 
county agents and assistants, and home economics agents v;ho work with 
the farmer and his family and who administer a state-wide educational 
program. Work is also done with firms which furnish the tools and supplies 
for farm production and which market and process agricultural commodi- 
ties. In these programs the Extension Service employs a variety of methods 
and devices. These include method and result demonstrations for group 
meetings, a training program for farm leaders within the community, 
and close contact with organized clubs of men, women, and young people. 
The service also publishes a great number of pamphlets, bulletins and cir- 
culars which it distributes free of chars^e. In addition, it holds a number of 
short courses, both on the College campus and elsewhere throughout the 
State, to offer rural leaders advice and training in creating better homes and 
farms and in using more efficient farming practices. 







J 



1 i 



101 

School 

Of 

Design 

HENRY L. KAMPHOEFNER, Dean 

The School of Design in its teaching recognizes the dangers inherent in 
a materialist-mechanistic civilization where there may be an over-reliance 
on the machine and the mechanical devices available for use in the con- 
struction of shelter. Therefore, the school gives attention to the larger re- 
sponsibility of architecture, rhe art of humanizing the environment. Also, 
the school seeks to integrate the architect as a social human being and the 
architect as scientist-engineer, and encourages and nurtures the architect- 
engineer as the coordinator of the structural dynamics in the over-all pat- 
tern of life. 

While the School of Design's first aim is to serve North Carolina and the 
regions of the South, the students are well equipped, through the teaching 
of the school, to work in any region. 

Because character, a profound devotion, and an absolute professional 
commitment are prime ingredients of any creative activity where the social 
responsibilities are as vital as in architecture and design, the school fosters 
and cultivates the integrity of the individual. 

The School of Design emphasizes individual creative expression and at 
the same time teamwork is encouraged and developed. 

The faculty members of the School of Design have been selected for 
their individual and diverse personal philosophies and their individual yet 
divergent professional qualifications. The school has brought together 
creative personalities willing in their teaching to subordinate their own 
professional interests to the interests of their students. Each School of De- 
sign faculty member gives the young student the benefit of his professional 
knowledge, his technical training, and his experience as a citizen. 

To combat the dangers of over-specialization the school seeks to develop 
the personality and character of the student as a whole. The goal in the 
growth of the student is not only the mastery of the architectural techni- 
ques of the profession; but through the stimulation and development of 
the intellectual and emotional capacities together, a readiness is developed 
to meet the challenge of any environment. 

The School of Design is intended to act as an educational center which 
unifies different design professions in the fundamental knowledge and 
methods which they share; its further intention is the education of men 
who will be competent within the specific demands and limitations of 
a particular field of design. The existence of contemporary design is con 
sidered to be a requirement of contemporary man, and the greatest pur- 
pose of contemporary design is considered to be the solution of those re- 



102 The General Catalog 

(^uirements through full use of the ingenuity and knowledge of contem- 
porary man. Through this point of view the technical and factual aspects 
of design present no conflict with its philosophical and aesthetic standards. 

The School of Design is comprised of the Departments of Architecture, 
Landscape Architecture, and Product Design. 

The three professional fields have been grouped under one broad and 
unified study of the methods and values which are common to all de- 
signers, and they arc separated only in the study of their application in 
the work of a single profession. Many classes throughout the curricula will 
include students in these professional fields; and for all students the course 
of study is the same during the first year in order that, having become more 
familiar with the whole scope of activity in design, they may then select 
ihe design profession in which they are most interested. 

Training in drawing, painting, sculpture and other visual arts is con- 
ducted by specialists within the staff of the School of Design; the essential 
knowledge of techniques and materials is taught by this faculty and other 
departments of the College; and the past and present of the professions are 
taught by this faculty. These ingredients of design training are assimilated 
through their application in the design courses. Thus the student is re- 
quired to increasingly combine these studies as he advances through the 
course so that he may achieve that comprehensive combination which is a 
necessity in the designer Much of the student's work will be done in 
laboratory courses since design is a matter of the application of knowledge 
rather than its mere accumulation. From his first day in class to his last the 
student is asked to design, and he is counseled so that he may become a 
responsible professional in the broadest sense. 

Curricula 

The School of Design offers professional instruction to the undergrad- 
uate in architecture, landscape architecture, and product design. A grad- 
uate program in all three departments is projected for the future. 

Degrees 

The five-year curricula offer courses of study leading to the Bachelor of 
Architecture, Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, and the Bachelor of 
Product Design, 

Facilities 

The School of Design moved to Brooks Hall in January, 1956. Brooks 
Hall is the former Hill Library, built in 1928. The new Brooks Hall is a 
remodeling of 28,000 square feet of floor space and a new addition of 
20,000 square feet. All of the facilities of the school are now in modern, 
especially designed quarters under one roof. 

Opportunities 

State law now requires the graduate architect to work not less than three 
years in the offices of registered architects and to pass the four day written 



Design 103 

examination given by the North Carolina Board of Architecture before 
he is ready to begin his own practice. The great national boom in build- 
ing construction since World War II has brought a tremendous volume of 
work into the offices of the South, offering many attractive positions for 
the architectural graduate. The architectural graduate is also qualified for 
positions in certain branches of engineering, building research and teach- 
ing. 

The accelerated urban growth of the twentieth century has created an 
unprecedented demand for landscape architects that far exceeds the pro- 
duction of schools. These positions exist in both public and private or- 
ganizations, encompassing a range of interests from city and regional plan- 
ning to residential developments. For the competent graduate advancement 
is rapid, and remimeration above average. 

Evidence of the soundness of the course of study and the programs in 
design at North Carolina State College is reflected by two of the school's 
recent graduates who have been a^varded the Fellowship in Landscape 
Architecture to the American Academy in Rome— a prize awarded annually 
to any design graduate in the United States and affording two years of 
advanced study in Europe, providing all expenses and residence at the 
American Academy in Rome. Four graduates of the school have won the 
top academic award in Architecture, the Paris Prize, which is a scholarship 
worth S5,000 for a year's study in Europe. 

The Department of Product Design, which took its first students in 
September 1958, prepares graduates to work as resident designers with the 
furniture manufacturers and other essential and important industries of 
the State. Graduates of the department will also be qualified to establish 
offices as professional industrial designers in the major cities of the State. 



Department of Architecture 

Professors: 

H.\RWELL H. Harris, Duncan R. Stuart 
Associate Professors: 

Joseph N. Boaz, Joseph H. Cox, Jerzy Glowczeuski, Charles H. Kahn, Edward W. 

Waugh 
Assistant Professors: 

George L. Bireline, Paul Buisson, John Hertzman, Ch.\rles M. Sappenfield, Vernon 

Shogren, Brian Shawcroft, E. Wayne Taylor, Richard S. Wurman 
Instructors: 

D. Grant Joslin, Willl\m C. Nichols 
Librarian: 

Mrs. Jaues A. Lyons 

Architecture demands a fusion of the artist's decision with competent 
technical judgments. If it is good architecture, the design must be the 
product of creative insight into the meaning of the building as an object 
defining spaces, and must also embody an artistic declaration of the build- 
ing's meaning to men and to their advancement. At the same time architec- 
ture must be technologically feasible and economically sound, and the 
form and spirit of the design must survive and be strengthened by the 



104 



The General Catalog 



lengthy and complicated methods by which it is transformed into a build- 
ing. Good architecture does not acknowledge that the conception of a 
design and its execution are opposed to each other. Instead, it joins the 
two so that they are realized in a single act, and subjective and conceptual 
choices are based on a clear and complete understanding of reality. 

The training of architects must stir in them the realization that technical 
skill is meaningless without a guiding purpose and that practical problems 
they face need not be opposed to their dreams and ambitions. In arts and 
letters the student must learn and value the purpose of architecture; in 
science and engineering he must learn the principles that challenge or 
limit him; and in his study of architecture he must learn the fusion of 
science and art in buildings. Four parallel programs (architecture, art, 
humanities and social sciences, and science and engineering) occupy the 
student throughout his program of study. After its completion the student 
is not merely ready for the apprenticeship that precedes his becoming a 
qualified architect. He is prepared to ponder and evaluate the things he 
learns during his apprenticeship and the things he learns as his self-educa- 
tion continues. Thus, he can combine the practical reguirements of the 
working profession of architecture with the even more practical desire to 
realize the full meaning of his profession. 

Architecture Curriculum 



First Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester 

DN 101, Design I 3 DN 102, Design II 

DN 111, Descriptive Drawing I 2 DN 112, Descriptive Drawing II . 

DN 121, Technical Drawing I 3 DN 122, Technical Drawing II _ 

ENG 111, Composition 3 ENG 112, Composition 

MA 101, Algebra and Trigonometry _. 5 MA 102, Analytic Geometry and 

MS 101, Military Science I Calculus I 

or MS 102, Military Science I 

AS 121, Air Science I 1 or 

PE 101, Physical Education _ „ _ 1 AS 122. Air Science I 

PE 102, Physical Education 

18 



Credits 

3 

__... 2 



.. 3 
.. 4 



17 



Second Year 



Fall Semester 

ARC 201, Architectural Design I 
DN 211, Descriptive Drawing III 
HI 245, European Civilization _ 
MA 201, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II _. 

PY 211, General Physics 

MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 221, Air Science II 

PE 201, Physical Education 



Credits 

4 

2 



Spring Semester Credits 

ARC 202, Architectural Design II 4 

DN 212, Descriptive Drawing IV 2 

EM 200, Introduction to Mechanics 3 

HI 246, European Civilization 3 

PY 212, General Physics 4 

MS 202. Military Science II 
or 

AS 222. Air Science II 1 

PE 202. Physical Education 1 



18 



19 



Design 



105 



Summer Requirement 

Two weeks on Historic Architecture Research— Field Work 

Third Yeor 



Fall Semester Credits 

ARC 301, Architectural Design III 6 

CE 338, Structures I 4 

DN 311, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing I _ 2 

DN 321, History of Architecture I 3 

EM 301, Solid Mechanics I 3 

•Elective 3 



21 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



ARC 300, Historic Architecture 

Research 

ARC 302, Architectural Design IV 

ARC 312, Materials and Specifications 

CE 339, Structures II 

DN 312, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing II 

DN 322, History of Architecture II 



2 
3 

80 



Summer Requirement 

Ten weeks on approved construction or office project experience. 

Fourth Year 



Fall Semester 

ARC 377, Environmental Factors ._ 
ARC 401, Architectural Design V 

ARC 421, Structural Design I 

DN 411, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing III 

DN 421, History of Design I 

•Elective 



Credits 

3 

6 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



ARC 378, Environmental Factors 3 



VI 



. 6 



ARC 402, Architectural Design 

ARC 422, Structural Design II 3 

DN 412, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing IV 2 

DN 422. History of Design II 3 

•Elective 3 



20 



20 



Fall Semester 

ARC 501, Architectural Design VII .. 

ARC 511, Professional Practice 

ARC 531, Structural Design III 

DN 541, Seminar on Ideas in Design 
•Elective 



Fifth Yeor 

Credits Spring Semester 



19 



ARC 502, Architectural Design VIII 
ARC 532, Structural Design IV _ 

PHI 306, Philosophy of Art 

•Elective 



Credits 

9 

2 

3 

4 



18 



• Six credits of elective will be required in the literature of English ond three In the social sciences. The 
remaining 10 hours shall be free electives. (Total credits for Bachelor of Architecture — 190.) 



106 The General Catalog 

Department of Landscape Architecture 

Associate Professor Richard A. Moore, Head of the Department 
Professors: 

Lewis J. Clarke, Edwin G. Thurlow, Duncan R. Stuart 
Associate Professor: 

Joseph H. Cox 
Assistant Professors: 

George L. Bireline, John Hertzman 
Instructor: 

D. Grant Joslin 

Landscape architecture, beginning in ancient times, is now defined as the 
design of outdoor space for the benefit, protection, use and enjoyment of 
people. Never before have the challenges to this profession been so great, 
diverse, and complex. It is to their solutions that this department is di- 
rected. One such challenge is the design of landscapes with architectural 
character and scale, such as those associated with the city, town, park, and 
garden. Another challenge is the designed development of the earth's re- 
sources in landscapes of varying character, from coast to mountain, from 
desert to pasture. Unlike many art forms time is an essence of the design, 
and long periods are often necessary before it has grown to completion. 
Architectural and engineering materials are used together with plants and 
trees. These latter materials have a continuous cycle of growth and move- 
ment, closely coupled with the forces of nature. The profession is both 
an art and a science, depending at the same time upon logic and technology. 
A student in the department is associated with allied fields such as archi- 
tecture, engineering, painting, sculpture, horticulture, botany, geology, 
and ecology. In spite of the necessity for assimilation of such specialized re- 
quirements, he must possess a background from which to design. For this 
reason he is given a sound and thorough analysis of the past through the 
study of historical examples. With the rapid growth of the world's popula- 
tion and the increasingly intensive use of land, it is imperative that the 
student have both ability and clarity of purpose if he is to develop and 
design landscape solutions that are beautiful, useful, productive, and of 
continuing value. 

Lahdscape Architecture Curriculum 

Firsf Yeor 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

DN 101, Design I — 3 DN 102. Design II 3 

DN 111, Descriptive Drawing I 2 DN 112, Descriptive Drawing II 2 

DN 121. Technical Drawing I 3 DN 122, Technical Drawing II 3 

ENG 111, Composition 3 ENG 112, Composition 3 

MA 101, Algebra and Trigonometry ..... 5 MA 102, Analytic Geometry and 

MS 101, Military Science I Calculus I 4 

or MS 102, Military Science I 

AS 121, Air Science I 1 or 

PE 101, Physical Education 1 AS 122, Air Science I 1 

PE 102, Physical Education 1 

18 

17 



Design 



107 



Second Year 



Fall Semester 

ARC 201, Architectural Design I 

BO 103, General Botany 

DN 211, Descriptive Drawing III 
HI 245, European Civilization _ 

PY 211, General Physics 

MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 221, Air Science II 

PE 201, Physical Education 



Credits 

4 

4 

2 

3 

4 



1 
1 

19 



Spring Semester Credits 

ARC 202, Architectural Design II 4 

DN 212, Descriptive Drawing IV 2 



HI 246, European Civilization 
MIG 120, Physical Geology _ 

PY 212, General Physics 

MS 202, Military Science II 
or 

AS 222, Air Science II 

PE 202. Physical Education _ 



1 
1 

18 



Summer Requirement 

Two weeks Historic Architecture or Landscape Architecture Research— Field Work. 

Third Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

DN 311, Advanced Descriptive ARC 300, Historic Architecture 

Drawing I 2 Research 2 

DN 321, History of Architecture I 3 DN 312, Advanced Descriptive 

HS 211, Ornamental Plants 3 Drawing II _ 2 

LA 301, Landscape Design I 5 DN 322, History of Architecture II 3 

LA 311, Landscape Construction 4 HS 212, Ornamental Plants _ 3 

•Elective 3 LA 302, Landscape Design II 5 

LA 312, Landscape Construction 4 

20 

19 

Summer Requirement 

Ten weeks on approved construction or office project experience. 



Fourth Year 



BO 441, Plant Ecology 3 

DN 411, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing III 2 

DN 421, History of Design I 3 

LA 401, Landscape Design III 6 

LA 421, Planting Design 4 

•Elective 3 



Spring Semester 
DN 412. Advanced Descriptive 
Drawing IV 



DN 422, History of Design II 
LA 402, Landscape Design IV . 

LA 422, Planting Design 

•Electives 



Credits 



21 



21 



Fall Semester 

DN 511, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing V 2 

DN 541, Seminar on Ideas in Design ... 2 

LA 501, Landscape Design V 6 

LA 511, Landscape Construction and 

Professional Practice 4 

•Electives 4 



Fifth Yeor 

Credits Spring Semester 



DN 512, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing VI 

LA 502, Landscape Design VI . 

PHI 306. Philosophy of Art _.. 

•Electives 



Credits 



19 



18 



Six credits will be required in the literature of English and six in the sociol sciences. The remaining 
10 hours shall be free electives. (Total credits for the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture — 190.) 



108 The General Catalog 

Department of Product Design 

Associate Professor Victor J. Papanek, Head of the Department 
Professor: 

Duncan R. Stuart 
Associate Professor: 

Joseph H. Cox 
Assistant Professors: 

William J. Baron, George L. Bireline, John Hertzman, Clark Macomber 
Instructor: 

D. Grant Joslin 

Product design (or industrial design) has most often been associated with 
the appearance value and other sensory attributes of mass-produced prod- 
ucts of every description. It is relatively new as a profession, dating back to 
the early thirties, when early attempts at "styling" helped to sell consumer 
goods in a depressed market. Today the designer's influence has spread to 
almost every object we buy or use in daily life, from transportation and 
farm machinery to household appliances, furniture, office equipment, hard- 
ware, and toys. 

Students in the Department of Product Design search for new ways to 
solve product problems, questioning prosaic solutions, and employing 
their understanding of materials and techniques at a high level of creative 
activity. New products and functional improvements are developed in 
the design laboratory and described in models, sketches, and engineering 
drawings. The student includes a summary of production requirements, 
cost estimates, distribution methods, packaging ideas and other pertinent 
information required to make his reports inclusive of all the skills devel- 
oped at the school, in simulation of the product problem. The profession 
requires exceptional creative ability, coupled with sound judgment for the 
responsibilities implicit in design for large scale consumption. There are 
few areas more rewarding economically, or in the personal satisfaction of 
design for human need. 



Product Design Curriculum 

First Yeor 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

DN 101. Design I 3 DN 102, Design II 3 

DN 111, Descriptive Drawing I 2 DN 112, Descriptive Drawing 11 2 

DN 121, Technical Drawing I 3 DN 122, Technical Drawing II _. 3 

ENG 111, Composition 3 ENG 112, Composition 3 

MA 101, Algebra and Trigonometry 5 MA 102, Analytic Geometry and 

MS 101, Military Science I Calculus I 4 

or MS 102, Military Science I 

AS 121, Air Science I 1 or 

PE 101. Physical Education 1 AS 122, Air Science I 1 

— PE 102, Physical Education 1 

18 - 

17 



Design 



109 



Second Yeor 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



DN 211 
HI 245. 
IE 217, 
MA 201 

PD 201. 
PY 211, 
MS 201, 

AS 122, 
PE 201, 



Descriptive Drawing III 2 

European Civilization 3 

Machine Tools ._.. 1 

, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 

Product Design and Orientation 4 

General Physics 4 

Military Science II 
or 



Air Science II 

Physical Education 



. I 
- 1 

20 



Spring Semester 

DN 212, Descriptive Drawing IV 



Credits 



- 2 

HI 246, European Civilization 3 

IE 218, Metal Forming 1 

PD 202, Product Design and Orientation 4 
PSY 200, Introduction to Psychology ... 3 

PY 212, General Physics .._ 4 

MS 202. Military Science II 
or 

AS 222. Air Science II 1 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 



19 



Fall Semester 



CH 101, General Chemistry I _.. 4 

DN 311, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing I 2 

EC 425, Industrial Management 3 

EM 200, Introduction To Mechanics 3 

PD 301, Product Design 6 

PD 331, Materials and Processes 3 



Third Yeor 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 103, General Chemistry II 4 

DN 312. Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing II _ 2 

EM 301, Solid Mechanics 3 

PD 302, Product Design 6 

PD 332, Materials and Processes 3 

Elective 3 



21 



21 



Fourth Year 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



DN 411, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing III 2 

IE 301, Engineering Economy 2 

PD 401, Advanced Product Design 6 

PD 441, Design Analysis 2 

•Electives 7 



19 



Spring Semester Credits 

DN 412. Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing IV _ 2 

IE 425, Sales and Distribution Methods 2 

PD 402, Advanced Product Design 6 

PD 422, OflQce and Industrial Practice .. 2 
PD 442, Design Analysis 2 

•Electives 6 



20 



Fall Semester 



Fifth Year 

Credits 



DN 511, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing V 2 

DN 541, Seminar on Ideas in Design 2 

PD 501, Advanced Product Design 8 

PSY 464, Visual Perception _. _ 3 

•Electives 3 



18 



Spring Semester Credits 

DN 512, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing VI _. 2 

PD 502, Product Design Thesis ... 9 

PSY 441, Human Factors in 

Equipment Design — 3 

•Electives 3 



17 



* Six credits will be required in the literature of English and six in the social sciences. The remoining 
10 hours shall be free electives. (Total credits for the Bachelor of Product Design — 190.) 



I 



v^ 



> 




Ill 

School 

Of 

Education 



J. BRYANT KIRKLAND, Dean 

With the current and anticipated increase in the number of secondary 
school age boys and girls in North Carolina, it is necessary for the educa- 
tional institutions of the State to prepare a greater number of students to 
be teachers in the public schools. There is a particular need for teachers 
in the areas of vocational agriculture, industrial arts, industrial education, 
mathematics and science. 

The School of Education graduates students who are qualified for teach- 
ing positions in these areas. 

The school includes the Departments of Agricultural Education, In- 
dustrial Arts, Industrial Education, Mathematics and Science Education, 
Occupational Information and Guidance, Psychology, and Recreation and 
Park Administration. 

Objectives 

The primary purpose of the Departments of Agricultural Education, In- 
dustrial Arts, Industrial Education, Mathematics and Science Education 
is to prepare students to become teachers in the North Carolina Public 
Schools. Satisfactory completion of the curriculum requirements in any 
of these departments qualifies a graduate to receive an A Grade certificate 
to teach in his chosen area. The curriculum in the Department of Recrea- 
tion and Park Administration is designed primarily to prepare students to 
become leaders of recreation programs in industry, institutions, and mtmi- 
cipalities. 

The Departments of Psychology and Occupational Information and 
Guidance offer professional instruction at the graduate level for psycho- 
logists and vocational counselors. In addition, these departments provide 
service courses for undergraduate students in the School of Education and 
the other schools of the College. 

Opportunities 

Agricultural education graduates find jobs as teachers of vocational agri- 
culture in which they conduct organized instructional programs of voca- 
tional agriculture for rural young people and adults. 

Public schools employ competent industrial arts and industrial education 
teachers whose job is to familiarize the young people of the State, particu- 
lar those in the non-farm areas, with the available occupational opportuni- 
ties which accompany an industrial expansion and to train these young 
people for entrance into the industrial occupations of their choice. 



112 The General Catalog 

Graduates in the Department of Recreation and Park Administration 
secure jobs as recreational leaders for municipalities, industries and in- 
stitutions while Department of Mathematics and Science graduates find 
jobs in public schools and industry. Students trained in the Department of 
Occupational Information and Guidance are employed by public schools 
as teachers and vocational counselors. 

The Department of Psychology serves the various industries in the State 
by helping to improve their personnel selection programs and by conduct- 
ing research designed to ascertain what factors influence efficiency of in- 
dustrial employees. 

Degrees 

The Bachelor of Science in Education is awarded to the students who 
complete the curricula in Agricultural Education, Industrial Arts Educa- 
tion, Industrial Education, Mathematics Education and Science Education. 

The School of Education also offers the Bachelor of Science in Recrea- 
tion and Park Administration and the Bachelor of Science in Industrial 
Arts for those students pursuing the technical option curriculum. 

The degree of Master of Education or the Master of Science in Educa- 
tion is offered to students majoring in Agricultural Education, Industrial 
Education, Industrial Arts Education and Guidance. The degree of Mas- 
ter of Science in Psychology is also offered. 

Department of Agricultural Education 

Professor C. C. Scarborough, Head of the Department 
Professor Emeriti: 

L. O. Armstrong, J. K. Coggin 
Professor: 

J. Bryant Kirkland 
Adjunct Professor: 

G. B. James 
Research Associate Professor: 

L. W. Drabick 
Assistant Professors: 

T. R. Miller, H. E. Beam 
Instructors: 

C. D. Bryant, C. H. Rogers 

The program in agricultural education is concerned with two large areas 
of study— education and agriculture. It is imperative that the objectives 
which give major direction to the program be clearly understood. People 
who produce, market, and/or process agricultural commodities are in a 
highly technical field. Emphasis is placed upon agriculture, agricultural 
products and processes. 1 he education of people who plan to educate others 
in the area of agriculture is somewhat different. The objectives here are 
educational objectives. Agricultural objectives deal with agriculture— the 
improvement of crops, livestock, soils, and the like. Educational objectives 
relate to people— bringing about growth development, and desirable change 
in people. The primary concern of agricultural education is with educa- 
tional objectives. 



Education 113 

Agricultural education, in its broad sense, should encompass those areas 
of study and pursuit which would enable one to participate effectively in 
planning, promoting, and initiating educational programs in agriculture. 
Therefore, the description of a graduate in agricultural education would 
be more nearly an "educaiioual leader' than an 'agricultural specialist". 

Every education leader as a person is a member of a family, a member of 
a commimity, a citizen (local, state, national, and international) , and a 
professional worker. 7 he experiences, understandings, and abilities needed 
by an educational leader are aot gained through class work only. His home 
life, community life, dormitory and social life on the campus, all make 
contributions to his preparation for his work as an educational leader. 

Undergraduate Program 

The program in agricultural education includes education for personal 
development, for commimity living, tor citizenship, for home living, and 
for educational leadership. These areas in the College program arc divided 
into three groups: 

(1) general education 

(2) technical or special education 

(3) professional education 

General education includes the education which everyone should have, 
namely, preparation for living effectively (1) with one's self, (2) with one's 
family, (3) in a community, (4) as a local, state, national, and world citi- 
zen, and (5) bringing to bear the knowledge of man in solving problems. 
The education of people should not differ fundamentally and widely in 
these areas. 

Special, or technical education consists of securing an understanding 
and ability to solve agricultural problems, with emphasis upon managerial 
aspects. Particular attention is given to a consideration of the impact of 
these problems upon the people of North Carolina. That is, "facts and 
figures about agriculture" will not suffice as technical education for the 
educational leader. A knowledge and understanding of agriculture and 
the ability to identify agricultural problems, make decisions, and solve 
problems is essential. 

Professional education includes an understanding of human behavior 
and development. Particular attention is given to an understanding of the 
learning process-as it occurs and how it can be accelerated. Consideration 
is also given to understanding how people work together in groups, par- 
ticularly in rural communities. Ability to do research in the community 
is essential. 

Graduate Program 

Qualified graduate students may secure a Master of Science in Education 
or Master of Education degree. Interested persons should see the Graduate 
Catalog or write to the Agricultural Education Department. 



114 



The General Catalog 



Facilities and Resources 

In addition to the College facilities and resources, the administrative 
personnel of most of the agricultural agencies and programs have offices in 
Raleigh. These people often serve as valuable resource people to students 
in agricultural education. 



^"Agricultural Education Curriculum 



Freshman Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

AG 103, Introduction to Agriculture 1 

BO 103, General Botany __... 4 

ED 102, Objectives in Agricultural 

Education 1 

ENG 111, Composition 3 

MA 111, Algebra and Trigonometry .... 4 
MS 101, Military Science I 
or 

AS 121, Air Science I _ 1 

PE 101, Physical Education 1 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

AGE 201, Agricultural Construction 

and Maintenance I 2 

Agriculture Elective 3 

ENG 122, Composition 3 

Math Elective _ 4 

ZO 103, General Zoology _ 4 

MS 102, Military Science I 
or 

AS 122, Air Science I 1 

PE 102, Physical Education __ _... 1 

18 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



AGE 202, Agricultural Construction 

and Maintenance II 2 

English Elective _ 3 

CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry .. 4 
PSY 200, Introduction to Psychology _ 3 

EC 201, Economics 3 

MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 221, Air Science II __ 1 

PE 201, Physical Education _ 1 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

AGE 211, Farm Power and 

Machinery I ._ 3 

AGO 212, Economics of Agriculture 3 

CH 203, General and 

Organic Chemistry 4 

ED 201, Farming Programs and FFA ._. 2 

PSY 304, Educational Psychology . 3 

MS 202, Military Science II 
or 

AS 222. Air Science II 1 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 



17 



Fall Semester 



Junior Year 



Credits 



AGC 311, Organization and Business 
Management of Marketing 

Firms _ 3 

ED 344, Secondary Education 2 

History Elective 3 

RS 301. Sociology of Rural Life 3 

SSC 200, Soils „ 4 

Free Elective 3 



18 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



AGC 303, Organization and Business 

Management of Farms 3 

Agricultural Engineering 
Elective 3 

ED 313, Teaching Rural People 2 

ED 420, Principles of Guidance 2 

English Elective 3 

PSY 476, Psychology of Adolescence .... 2 
Free Elective 3 



•A minimum of 137 semester credits required for graduation. 



18 



Education 1 1 5 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

AGE 401, Problems in Farm Mechanics 3 Agriculture Electives 6 

•ED 411, Student Teaching 6 Biological Science Elective 3 

ED 412. Teaching Adults 2 Political Science Elective 3 

ED 413, Teaching Materials 2 Free Electives 6 

RS 321, Introduction to Social Research 3 — 

- 18 

16 

Department of Industrial Arts 

Professor Ivan Hostetler, Head of the Department 
Associate Professor: 

Talmage B. Young 
Assistant Professors: 

Frank B. Bkilev, Carl A. Moeller, Robert T. Troxler 
Instructor: 

Paul R. Meosky 

Industrial arts comprises that area of education which concerns itself with 
materials, processes, and products of industry. It is concerned with a study 
of changes made in materials to make them more useful and with problems 
related to these changes. 

The Department of Industrial Arts at North Carolina State College per- 
forms two functions: first, it prepares teachers and supervisors of industrial 
arts for secondary schools, and second, it provides practical training for 
students interested in technical jobs in industry, such as industrial work in 
production, personnel, industrial sales, estimating, job training, mainten- 
ance and installation. 

Facilities 

The Department of Industrial Arts is located in Tompkins Hall. Labora- 
tory facilities are provided in drafting, woods, metals, electricity and elec- 
tronics, graphic arts, and ceramics. In addition to these, a special experi- 
mental laboratory is provided in order to encourage experimentation and 
research in all of the industrial arts areas at the advanced undergraduate 
and graduate levels. 

Opportunities 

The opportunities for employment as industrial arts teachers in North 
Carolina are greater than ever before. The demand for industrial arts 
teachers is greater than the supply. The demand for industrial employment 
is also very great. 

Graduate Study 

Opportunities are provided for (jualified students in Industrial Arts Edu- 
cation to do graduate work leading to the degree of Master of Education or 
Master of Science in Education. For additional information regarding 
graduate study, consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



• Summer Practice (1 week) is required prior to student teaching. 



116 



The General Catalog 



Industrial Arts Education Curriculum 



Freshmon Year 



Fall Semester 



Credits 

ENG 111, Composition 3 

lA 100, Introduction to Industrial Arts. 1 

lA 103, Drafting I _.. 3 

lA 107, Woods 1 - _- 3 

MA 111, Algebra and Trigonometry ... 4 
MS 101, Military Science I 
or 

AS 121, Air Science I _ _ 1 

PE 101, Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 112, Composition... 3 

lA 104, Drafting II 3 

lA 108, Woods II _ 3 

MS 102, Military Science I 
or 

AS 122, Air Science I 1 

PE 102, Physical Education I 

Mathematics Elective 4 



15 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry . 4 

lA 206, Metal Processing I 3 

PSY 200, Introduction to Psychology .. 3 

PY 211, General Physics 4 

MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 221, Air Science II .. 1 

PE 201. Physical Education . 1 



16 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

EC 205, Economic Process 3 

ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 3 

lA 207, Metal Processing II 3 

PY 212, General Physics 4 

SOC 202, Principles of Sociology 3 

MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 222, Air Science II 1 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

ED 344, Secondary Education 2 

lA 205, Industrial Arts Design 2 

lA 307, Basic Electricity 3 

PSY 304. Educational Psychology 3 

English Elective 3 

History Elective 3 

•Electives 3 



19 



18 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

ED 422, Methods of Teaching 

Industrial Subjects 4 

lA 304, General Shop Organization 2 

lA 308, Basic Electronics 3 

PS 201, The American Govern- 
mental System 3 

PSY 476, Psychology of Adolescence 2 

* Electives 4 



18 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

ED 444, Student Teaching in 

Industrial Subjects 6 

ED 482, Curriculum Problems in 

Industrial Arts 2 

ED 483, Instructional Aids and Devices 2 
lA 465, Independent Study in 

Industrial Arts _ 3 

lA 484, School Shop Planning and 

Equipment Selection 3 

•Electives 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

ED 420, Principles of Guidance 2 

lA 480, Modern Industries 3 

♦Electives 12 



17 



19 



•Twelve hours are to be technical electives; the remaining 10 hours ore to be free electives. 



Education 1 1 7 

Industrial Arts — Technical Option Curriculum 

Freshman and sophomore years are the same as in industrial arts education. 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

lA 205, Industrial Arts Design 2 lA 308, Basic Electronics ._ 3 

lA 307, Basic Electricity 3 PSY 337, Industrial Psychology I 3 

IE 310, Industrial Safety _ 2 SOC 301, Human Behavior 3 

IE 332, Motion and Time Study _ 4 English Elective 3 

PS 201, The American Govern- History Elective _— 3 

mental Systems 3 *Elective — 3 

•Elective 3 — 



18 



17 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credit) 

EC 425, Industrial Management 3 EC 426, Personnel Management 3 

lA 321, Metalwork Technology 2 EC 432, Industrial Relations 3 

lA 480, Modern Industries 3 IE 430, Job Evaluation and Wage 

IE 408, Production Control 3 Incentives 3 

*Electives 8 *Electives 10 



19 19 

Department of Industrial Education 

Professor Durwin M. Hanson, Head of the Department 
Assistant Professor: 
Floyd P. Gehres 

The Department of Industrial Education offers the only curriculum in the 
State that prepares teachers of industrial education for the public schools. 
The main goal is to provide public schools with adequately trained person- 
nel who can, in turn, help to develop a vitally needed reservoir of skilled 
workers and technical personnel to man established industries as well as 
prepare for new industries. The curriculum is planned to provide students 
with broad cultural and professional backgrounds to parallel occupational 
experience. 

Candidates for a degree must have had at least two years of successful 
trade or technical experience in the occupational area they wish to teach. 
The student who has not had this experience when he enters must fulfill 
the requirement before graduation either by working part of the school 
year or by completing the work experience after finishing the required 
resident courses. 

Opportunities 

The student who completes this curriculum Avill be prepared to teach 
in the all-day trade schools, area vocational technical schools and the part- 
time, or evening vocational classes. Graduates have no difficulty in obtain- 
ing employment as institutional teachers. 



Twelve hours ore to be technical electives; the remaining 1 2 hours are to be free electives. 



118 



The General Catalog 



Graduate Study 

General and specialized professional courses are available to qualified 
students who wish to pursue graduate study as industrial education teachers, 
supervisors or coordinators of diversified occupations. The completion of 
the Master of Education or Master of Science in Education degree in 
industrial education will also qualify one for a Graduate Certificate in 
North Carolina. 



"'Industrial Educational Curriculum 

Freshman 

Fall Semester Credits 

ED 100, Introduction to Industrial 

Education „. 2 

ENG 111, Composition 3 

MA 111, Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry _ 4 

lA 103, Drafting I 3 

MS 101, Military Science I 
or 

AS 121, Air Science I 1 

PE 101, Physical Education ._ _ 1 

18 



Yeor 

Spring Semester Credits 

History Elective _ _ 3 

ENG 112, Composition 3 

MA 112, Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

or 
MA 122, Mathematics of Finance and 

Elementary Statistics _ 4 

lA 104, Drafting II 3 

MS 102, Military Science I 

or 

AS 122, Air Science I 1 

PE 102, Physical Education I 



15 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

PY 211, General Physics _. 4 PY 212, General Physics 4 

ENG, English Elective 3 SOC 202, Principles of Sociology 3 

PSY 200, Introduction to Psychology .. 3 EC 205, Economic Process 3 

PS 201, American Government System.. 3 MS 202, MiHtary Science II 
MS 201. Military Science II or 

or AS 222, Air Science II 1 

AS 221, Air Science II 1 PE 202, Physical Education 1 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 * •Elective 5 

••Elective 3 

17 

18 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

ED 344, Secondary Education 2 

PSY 304, Educational Psychology 3 

SOC 401, Human Relations in 

Industrial Society _ 3 

IE 310. Industrial Safety _ 2 

ED 327, History and Philosophy of 

Industrial-Technical Education 3 
• *Elective 5 



18 



Spring Semester Credits 

PSY 337, Industrial Psychology 
or 

PSY 476, Psychology of Adolesence 2-3 

ED 305, Analysis of Technical Education 
Programs and Course 

Constuction _ 3 

RPA 333. First Aid and Safety 2 

ED 422. Methods of Teaching 

Industrial Subjects 4 

English Elective 3 

••Elective 8 



17-18 



•Minimum of 136 Semester hours required for graduation. 
•* Fifteen hours of elective courses must be selected in accordance with the student's area of speciali- 
zation and with approval of the adviser. Remaining hours may be taken from free electives. 



Education 119 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ED 440, Vocational Education ._ 2 EC 425, Industrial Management 3 

ED 483, Instructional Aids and Devices 2 EC 432, Industrial Relations 3 

ED 405, Industrial and Technical Edu- ED 420, Principles of Guidance . 2 

cation Shop and Laboratory •Elective 8 

Planning 3 

ED 444, Student Teaching in 16 

Industrial Subjects 6 

•Elective 3-4 



16-17 



Departmenf of Mathematics and 
Science Education 



Associate Professor Herbert E. Speece, Head of the Department 
Assist arit Professor: 

Henry A. Shannon 

The Department of Mathematics and Science Education offers curricula foi 
students who wish to become teachers of mathematics or science. Each cur- 
riculum pro\'ides for a well-rounded professional preparation. There is 
sufficient flexibility in each curriculum to enable the student to meet cer 
tification requirments in both subject matter areas by proper selection ol 
elective courses. This flexibility also enables the student to specialize in 
one subject matter area thus opening up job opportunities in related fields 
requiring a substantial background in mathematics and science, such as 
research teams in industry, government research projects involving rockets, 
guided missiles, computers or pure research. 



Opportunities 

The acute shortage of mathematics and science teachers in the secondary 
schools provides excellent employment opportunities for more graduates 
in this department. Attractive job opportunities are also available for 
industrial employment. The rapid technological and scientific develop 
ments during the past few years have accentuated the importance of math- 
ematics and science. Future developments will depend upon the accom 
plishments of persons who have received adequate training in these areas. 

* Fifteen hours of elective courses must be selected in accordance with the student's orea of specih- 
zotion and with approval of the adviser. Remaining hours may be taken from free electives. 



120 



The General Catalog 



'^Mathematics Education Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry ._ 4 CH 103, General and Qualitative 

tNG 111, Composition _ 3 Chemistry _ 4 

History Elective 3 ENG 112, Composition ..._ 3 

MA 101, Algebra and Trigonometry 5 MA 102, Analytic Geometry and 

MS 101, Military Science I Calculus I 4 

or MA 122, Mathematics of Finance and 

AS 121, Air Science I _ 1 Elementary Statistics 4 

PE 101, Physical Education 1 MS 102, Military Science I 

or 

17 AS 122, Air Science I 1 

PE 102, Physical Education 1 



17 



Sophomore Yeor 



Fall Semester 

ED 203, Introduction to Teaching 

MA 201. Calculus II 

PY 211, Physics 



Credits 

2 

..... 4 
4 



SOC 202. Principles of Sociology 3 

MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 221. Air Science II 1 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 

PSY 200, Introduction to Psychology 3 



18 



Spring Semester 

BO 103, General Botany 

or 
ZO 103, General Zoology .... 

MA 202, Calculus III 

PY 212, Physics 

MS 202, Military Science II 
or 

AS 222. Air Science II 

PE 202, Physical Education 
Electives 



Credits 



17 



Fall Semester 

EC 205, Economic Process 

PS 201, The American Governmental 
System 



Junior Year 

Credits Spring Semester 

..... 3 CE 201, Surveying 



PSY 304, Educational Psychology 
Electives _. 



.10 



19 



PY 223, Astronomy 

ED 344, Secondary Education .. 

English Elective 

* *Electives _. 



Credits 



.10 
18 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ED 470, Methods of Teaching Math _.... 3 ED 420, Principles of Guidance 2 

•'•ED 471, Student Teaching in Math .. 6 MA 433, History of Math 3 

V.D 472, I)e\cl()|)iiig and Sclcctinjr **Electives _ 9 

Teaching Materials in Math _.. 2 English Elective 3 

PSY 476, Psychology of Adolescence 2 

17 

13 

* '?'or?'"i.TA"Jn'?^ -M^ semester credits required for graduation. Beginning with the fail semester of 
iVGS, MA 101 will not count toward graduation in mathematics education; however, MA 403 will be 
required. 

** A minimum of 9 semester hour electives in mathematics. All electives must be selected with approval 
of adviser. 
*** During the fall semester of the Senior year 10 weeks will be devoted to full-time off-campus work at 
on approved Student Teaching Center and approximately 6 weeks to concentrated courses. 



Education 



121 



^Science Education Curriculum 



Freshman Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

ZO 103, General Zoology 4 

History Elective ^ 3 

MA 111, Algebra and Trigonometry ... 4 

ENG 111, Composition - 3 

MS 101, Military Science I 
or 

AS 121, Air Science I - — I 

PE 101. Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester Crediti 

ZO 205, Invertebrate Zoology _ 4 

MA 112, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

BO 103, General Botany 4 

ENG 112, Composition 3 

MS 102, Military Science I 
or 

AS 122, Air Science I 1 

PE 102, Physical Education 1 



17 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

BO 301, General Morphology 

or 

BO 403, Systematic Botany 3 

CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry . 4 
PS 201, The American Govern- 
mental System 3 

SOC 202, Principles of Sociology 3 

MS 201, Military Science II 

or 

AS 221, Air Science II 1 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 

••Elective 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

MIG 120, Physical Geology . 3 

CH 103, General and Qualitative 

Chemistry 4 

ED 203, Introduction to Teaching 2 

ZO 213, Human Physiology 3 

MS 202, Military Science II 
or 

AS 222, Air Science II 1 

PE 202, Physical Education ._ 1 

••Electives 3 



17 



18 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 

CH 203, General and Organic 

Chemistry 

EC 205, The Economic Process 

ED 344, Secondary Education 

PY 211, Physics . 

English Elective 

••Electives 



Credits 



Spring Semester Crcediti 

PSY 304, Educational Psychology 3 

PY 212, Physics 4 

••Electives 11 



18 



19 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

ED 475, Methods of Teaching in 

Science _. 3 

•••ED 476, Student Teaching in 

Science . 6 

ED 477, Developing and Selecting 
Teaching Materials in 
Science 2 

PSY 476, Psychology of Adolescence . 2 



Spri7ig Semester Credits 

PY 223, Astronomy 3 

BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 

ED 420, Principles of Guidance 2 

••Elective - 6 

English Elective — 3 



18 



13 



*A minimum of 138 semester credits required for graduation. ■ * j -.u 

** A minimum of 6 semester hour electives in one area of science. All electives must be selected with 

approval of adviser. , ,, . ti „ l 

**• During the fall semester of the senior year 10 weeks will be devoted to full-time off-campus wori- 

at an approved Student Training Center and approximately 6 weeks to concentrated courses. 



122 The General Catalog 



Departmenf of 
Occupational Information and Guidance 



Professor Rov N. Anderson, Head of the Departmejit 
Associate Professor: 

Charles G. Morehead 

The Department of Occupational Information and Guidance has been 
training guidance and personnel workers for more than four decades. The 
first master's degree was awarded in 1926. The programs of graduate 
study are planned to develop a broad understanding of guidance and 
personnel services to be applied in various settings. It is most desirable for 
an applicant who wishes to specialize in guidance and personnel services 
to have had undergraduate course \vork in economics, education, psychol- 
ogy, sociology, or social work. Students accepted into the program are 
those who anticipate devoting full or part time to guidance and personnel 
u'ork. Teachers, administrators and others who wish to increase their know- 
ledge of guidance and personnel may enroll for courses as a graduate minor 
or for certification renewal. 

Professional opportunities for placement in this field are on the increase. 
The department prepares students for positions as counselors in secondary 
schools, industrial education centers, colleges, community agencies; school 
or county guidance directors, rehabilitation counselors, employment coun- 
selors, placement interview^ers, and personnel workers in higher education, 
business or industry., and State and Federal government agencies. The 
student may specialize in one of several areas depending upon his vocational 
goals. 

The master's program includes a core of guidance and personnel courses 
to be selected according to the student's vocational goals. Students may 
select their minor from the following areas— economics, psychology, sociolo- 
gy and anthropology. The master's degree program of the department 
meets the requirements for the Counselor's Certificate issued by the North 
Carolina State Department of Public Instruction, as well as counselor 
certification in many other states. 

The Department of Occupational Information and Guidance has had 
a contract with the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation for the training 
of rehabilitation counselors, and has been a^varded four Counseling: and 
Guidance Training Institutes under contract with the United States Of- 
fice of Education as authorized by the National Defense Education Act of 
1958. 

The department also provides service courses in guidance and person- 
nel for undergraduate students in the School of Education. 



Education 123 

Departmenf of Psychology 

Professor Howard G. Miller, Head of the Department 
Professors: 

Key L. Barkley, Harold M. Corter 
Associate Professors: 

Norman M. Chanskv, John O. Cook, J. Clyde Johnson, Slater E. Newman, Paul J. Rust 
Assistant Professors: 

Eugene E. Bernard, Donald W. Drewis 
Adjunct Assistant Professor: 

Gilbert Gottlieb 
Instructor: 

James B. Grier 

In general, the courses in psychology are designed to promote a broad 
understanding of behavior as a science and to cultivate the skills which 
may be useful in dealing with human beings in social, educational, indus- 
trial or other situations. The department, however, offers courses of interest 
to students in all schools of the College. 

Graduate Study 

Graduate work is offered in the Department of Psychology leading to 
the degree of Master of Science in Psychology with options in industrial 
psychology, experimental psychology and school psychology. 

Deport-menf- of 
Recreation and Park Administration 

Professor Thomas I. Hines, Head of Department 
Associate Professor: 

Latham L. Miller 
Assistant Professors: 

Charles C. Stott, Albert Crawford 
Instructor: 

Herbert Brantley 

The Department of Recreation and Park Administration provides training 
for students who plan to become recreation leaders in industry, municipali- 
ties, institutions and rural communities. The recreation profession recog- 
nizes the importance of leaders who possess the competence needed to 
plan and supervise effective recreation programs. Competent leadership is 
the major factor affecting the scope, intensity and success of a program of 
organized recreation. 

All students pursue the same program for the first year after which they 
declare an option (employee, public, institutional recreation or park ad- 
ministration) and take courses designed to meet the needs in their respec- 
tive area of interest. 

Opportunities 

The demand of properly trained recreation leadership has increased 
rapidly in recent years. The number of graduates has not been sufficient 
to meet the demand for recreation leaders. 



124 The General Catalog 

*Recreotion and Park Administration Curriculum 

Freshman Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

ENG 111, Composition 3 

MA ill, Algebra and Trigonometry .... 4 

RP.\ 152, Introduction to Recreation 3 

ZO 103, General Zoology 4 

MS 101, Military Science I 
or 

AS 121, Air Science I 1 

PE 101, Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

BO 103, General Botany 4 

ENG 112, Composition 3 

MA 122, Mathematics of Finance 

and Elementary Statistics 4 

RPA 15^, Aquatic Program .__.. _ 2 

SOC 202, Principles of Sociology 3 

MS 102, Military Science I 
or 

AS 122, Air Science I 1 

PE 102, Physical Education .._ 1 



18 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

BO 214, Dendrology I 

or 

ZO 212, Human Anatomy 3 

EC 205, The Economic Process 3 

History Elective 3 

RPA 201, Playground Leadership 3 

RPA 255, Social Recreation 4 

MS 201, Military Science II 

or 

AS 221, Air Science II 1 

PE 201, Physical Education _ _ 1 



18 



Spring Semester Credits 

ZO 206, Vertebrate Zoology 
or 

ZO 213, Human Physiology 3 

ENG 215, Prin. of News Writing .. 3 

PS 201, American Government System .. 3 
PSY 200, Introduction to Psychology .... 3 
RPA 253, Principles of Physical 

Education _ 3 

MS 202, Military Science II 
or 

AS 222, Air Science II 1 

PE 202, Physical Education _... I 



17 



Junior Year 



Fall Serjiester Credits 

ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 3 

RPA 333, First Aid and Safety 2 

RPA 354, Personal and Community 

Hygiene ..._ 3 

SOC 301, Human Behavior 3 

••Elcctives within Interest Area 3 

Free Electives 3 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

HS 342, Landscape Gardening 3 

RPA 353, Camp Organization and 

Leadership 3 

RPA 355, Sports in Recreation 4 

••Electives within Interest Area 3 

Free Electives _... _ 3 



16 



* A minimum of 139 semester credits required for graduation. 

'* At the end of the sophomore year, a student must select on area of special interest. At least 12 
semester hours of course work must be token from the list of elective courses in the interest area. 



Education 1 25 



Summer Session (9 weeks) 



APA 470, Supervised Practice 



Credits 
6 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester 

RPA 415, Park Maintenance and 
and Operation 

RPA 471, Organizing the Recrea- 
tion Program 

RPA 472, Observation and Field 
Experience 



Credits 



SOC 416. Research Methods _. 3 

•Electives within Interest Area 3 

Free Electives 3 



Spririg Semester Credits 

RPA 451, Facility and Site 

Planning 3 

RPA 452, Recreation Administration 3 

RPA 501, Special Problems in 

Recreation 3 

•Electives within Interest Area 3 

Free Electives _ 3 



15 



16 



• At the end of the sophomore year, a student must select an area of special interest. At least 12 
semester hours of course work must be taken frorri the list of elective courses I i the interest areo. 
Field Work: Evidence of at least four months of satisfactory experience in the practice of his pro- 
fession is required for graduation. 



'V t • 





127 

School 
Of 



Engineering 



RALPH E. FADUM, Dean 

ROBERT G. CARSON, Director of Instruction 

W. E. ADAMS, Coordinator of Student Affairs 

The engineer has the responsibility and the obligation to use all newly 
discovered knowledge in his field for the benefit of mankind. Today, a 
new sense of responsibility has been imposed upon the engineer, by the 
impact of science and technology. 

Engineering studies are of the utmost interest and importance to those 
young men and women who look to industry, engineering education, or 
research for a career. These ambitions can well be furthered by the School 
of Engineering through its undergraduate or graduate programs, whereby 
students are offered technical instruction and leadership guidance by an 
experienced staff of qualified engineers and educators. 

The School of Engineering is organized into nine engineering depart- 
ments: Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Industrial, Mechanical, Mineral Indus- 
tries, Nuclear, Mechanics, and Research. Undergraduate degree programs 
are offered in the first eight departments listed. In addition, a new degree 
in Engineering Operations has been established. All the teaching depart- 
ments offer advanced studies leading to a professional degree or to the 
master's degree. The Doctor of Philosophy program is offered in ceramic, 
chemical, civil, electrical, mechanical and nuclear engineering. 

It is the policy of the School of Engineering to have all its curricula more 
than meet the standards of the Engineers' Council for Professional Develop- 
ment. It is the ambition of the school that these curricula and programs 
meet the needs of the people and industries of the State and region through 
effective instruction, competent research and development, and worthwhile 
scientific contributions to engineering knowledge. 

Curricula 

The curricula representing the study program in all of the departments 
are so arranged that the freshman year is common to all. They contain 
broadening courses in the humanities while emphasizing the basic and 
fundamental engineering principles essential to an engineering college 
program. Graduates of this program will not only be prepared for engineer- 
ing responsibilities and positions of trust in industry, but will also have 
an appreciation and consciousness of human problems in community and 
industrial life. Though an entering student is asked to designate a field of 
interest, he can with ease and without any interruption change to some 
other field of study within the School of Engineering at the end of the 
freshman year. 



128 The General Catalog 

Four- Year Bachelor's Curricula 

The four-year program provides education and training to meet the 
needs of from eighty to eighty-five per cent of the young men of North 
Carolina who will take their places in industry and industrial life in the 
fields of production, sales, application, planning and the operation of small 
industrial units. 

Professional (Fifth Year) Study 

The fifth-year specialized training leads to a professional degree (CE, 
CHE, ME, EE, and so forth) in ceramic, chemical, civil, electrical, geologi- 
cal, industrial, and mechanical engineering. The courses of study are 
especially designed to meet the needs of students desiring intensive speciali- 
zation in a particular field or additional course work not ordinarily covered 
in the normal four-year undergraduate curricula. 

Graduate Study 

The graduate activities are patterned to provide advanced training and 
experience to young men who have successfully completed a four-year pro- 
gram and who have an interest and ability to continue their education. 
This elective program trains graduates for positions and activities in teach- 
ing, technical design, and research. The Engineering School offers two 
programs of graduate study. The first represents a year of full-time study 
and thesis work and leads to a degree of Master of Science in some field 
of engineering. The second program leads to a doctor's degree in some 
field of engineering and usually requires three years of full-time study, 
thesis work and experimental activity. 

Research 

Research activities in the School of Engineering are based on a program 
correlated with graduate study in engineering. It is the purpose of this 
program not only to train future research workers, but also to carry out 
a program that assures both sound investigations of a fundamental nature 
in engineering sciences and work devoted to greater uses of the State's 
natural resources. Through publications, cooperative activity with industry 
and the operation of our own investigational projects, it is intended that 
the engineering research activities will be a part of and work effectively 
with the industrial development of North Carolina. 

Degrees 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering 

The four-year curricula offer programs of study leading to a bachelor's 
degree in agricultural, ceramic, chemical, civil, electrical, geological, in- 
dustrial, mechanical, metallurgical, nuclear engineering and engineer- 
ing mechanics. Aerospace engineering is an option in mechanical engi- 
neering, and construction engineering is an option in civil engineering. 
Graduation requirements are the satisfactory completion of all the re- 



Engineering 129 

quired courses in any one curriculum and other courses which amount to 
a minimum of 146 semester credit hours. A minimum scholastic record of 
a C average is also required. 

Specialized Degree 

A specialized Bachelor of Science degree is also offered through a pro- 
gram of study in furniture manufacturing and management. The course is 
planned for four years of study. Graduation requirements are the satis- 
factory completion of all the required courses and other courses which 
amount to a minimum total of 146 semester credit hours. A minimum 
scholastic record of C average is also required. 

Professional Degree in a Specialized Bronch of Engineering 

The professional degree in a specialized branch of engineering is an 
earned degree which can be obtained only after the bachelor's degree. 

The fifth-year curricula are especially designed to meet the needs of stu- 
dents desiring intensive specialization in a particular field or additional 
course work not ordinarily covered in the normal four-year undergraduate 
curricula. This professional program of study is offered in ceramic, chemi- 
cal, civil, electrical, geological, industrial, mechanical, and metallurgical 
engineering. 

For further information concerning the requirements for the professional 
degree, applications for admission, etc., write to the dean of engineering 
at North Carolina State College, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Master of Science in o Specialized Branch of Engineering 

The Master of Science in a specialized branch of engineering is an 
earned graduate degree which can be obtained only after the bachelor's 
degree. It requires at least one year of graduate w^ork, a reading knowledge 
of at least one foreign language and a thesis showing ability to pursue in- 
dependent research. The core of graduate courses taken must emphasize 
a scientific objective. Further information concerning the requirements 
for this degree may be obtained by writing the dean of the Graduate 
School at North Carolina State College, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Doch)r of Philosophy Degree 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is an earned graduate degree offered 
in ceramic, chemical, civil, electrical, mechanical, and nuclear engineer- 
ing. Admission requirements are the same as for the master's degree. It 
requires at least two years of graduate work in one of these listed major 
programs and a minor either in some field of engineering or in an allied 
science. The dissertation will deal with some problem in the field of the 
student's major interest. Further information concerning the degree may 
be obtained from the dean of the Graduate School at North Carolina 
State College, Raleigh, North Carolina. 



130 The General Catalog 



Short Courses and Institutes 



The School of Engineering ofiEers short courses and institutes both on 
the campus and at various centers throughout the State for adults and 
graduate engineers. Such courses vary in length from one day to twelve 
weeks; each year the courses offered are different and vary according to 
the public demand. The faculty of the School of Engineering usually 
hirnish a large portion of the instruction offered in these courses, which 
in the past have been for electrical metermen, gas plant operators, safety 
engineers, radio engineers, refrigeration and air plumbing contractors and 
surveyors. Classes are usually held in Raleigh where the School of Engi- 
neering has an excellent staff and adequate laboratories and classroom 
facilities available. 

These short courses offer real opportunity to practicing engineering 
personnel to follow a refresher program in their field of interest, as well 
as to become acquainted with the latest and most modem engineering 
procedures and equipment. 

Another educational services activity is that being carried out at the 
Gaston Technical Institute, Gastonia, North Carolina, where a two-year 
post-high school terminal technician program is sponsored by the School 
of Engineering and operated by the Extension Division of the College. A 
separate full-time staff is employed for this educational program which 
provides an integrated curriculum in English, mathematics, engineering 
drawing, machine shop, welding, electrical maintenance, and economics. 
Graduates of this program are trained for industry with the opportunity 
for rapid acceleration towards positions as foremen, maintenance super- 
visors, etc. 



Each of the engineering curricula is not only well-balanced, but offers a 
liberal course of study in a technical and professional field. Each conforms 
to what is regarded by engineering educators as the best modern practice. 

* Freshman Year in All Engineering Curricula 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101. General Inorganic CH 103, General and 

Chemistry 4 Qualitative Chemistry 4 

ENG 111. Composition S ENG 112, Composition 3 

E 100, Introduction to Engineering 1 EC 205, The Economic Process 

MA 101, Algebra and Trigonometry 5 or 

ME 101. Engineering Graphics I 2 HI 205, The Modem Western World _ 3 

•MS 101, Military Science I •♦MA 102, Analytic Geometry 

or and Calculus I 4 

•AS 121, Air Science I 1 ME 102, Engineering Graphics II 2 

•PE 101. Physical Education 1 •MS 102, Military Science I 



or 

17 •AS 122, Air Science I I 

•PE 102, Physical Education 1 

18 



• Students excused from military science or olr science and/or physical education will schedule equivalent 
credits in courses outside their department. 

'• To be eligible to roster courses taught by the School of Engineering above the freshman level, an 
engineering student must hove earned a minimum grode of "C" on MA 102. 

♦ txcept ttie Department of Agricultural Engineering. 



Engineering 



131 



The sophomore, junior, and senior programs of study in the various 
fields of engineering are shown under the department headings on the 
pages that follow. 

Humanities 

Social Studies Programs for Engineering Students— A specially designed 
sequence of courses comprising 21 credit hours is required of all engi- 
neering students and is incorporated in each curriculum. Its primary ob- 
jective is to broaden the student in the humanities and social sciences 
and to instill good habits in the use of the English language. Following 
a broad yet basic consideration of history, economics, and literature, the 
student progresses to an advanced and integrated study of contemporary 
civilization and of contemporary problems. The electives in the last year 
may be chosen from a group of approved courses which are built upon 
and closely related to the subject matter of the previous three years. 

Freshman Year 

Spring Semester Credits 

HI 205. The Modern Western World 

or 
EC 205, The Economic Process 3 

* Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

HI 205, The Modern Western World HI 205, The Modern Western World 

or or 

ENG 205, Reading for Discovery ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 

or or 

EC 205, The Economic Process 3 EC 205, The Economic Process 3 



Fall Semester 

SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 



Junior Year 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 
3 SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 3 



Fall Semester 

SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 
or 
Approved Elective 
(see list below) 



'Senior Year 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 
or 
Approved Elective 
(see list below) 



Credits 



Senior Electives for Humanities — Social Studies Program 



SS 491, Contemporary Issues 

SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 

HI 412, Recent United States History 
ENG 468, Major American Writers _ 
PS 401, American Parties and 

Pressure Groups 



Credits 
S 



Credits 



SOC 401, Human Relations in 

Industrial Society 3 

PHI 395, Philosophy Analysis 3 

EC 442, Evolution of Economic Ideas 3 

GN 301, Genetics in Human Affairs 3 



• History, economics, and literature may be scheduled In any order except that ENG 111, 112, Composi- 
tion, ore prerequisites for ENG 205. Only one course can be scheduled in a given semester without 
special permission. 
'•The student must take either SS 491, Contempxirary Issues I, or SS 492, Contemporary Issues II. He 
must select an elective from the senior electives list for the other senior semester. 



132 The General Catalog 

Courses from the approved list of senior electives will not be credited to 
the humanities sequence unless taken during the senior year. 

Professional Program in Engineering 

The School of Engineering offers fifth-year professional curricula lead- 
ing to the degrees Ceramic Engineer, Civil Engineer, Chemical Engineer, 
Electrical Engineer, Geological Engineer, Industrial Engineer, Mechani- 
cal Engineer, and Metallurgical Engineer. These curricula are tailor-made 
to fit the particular needs of each student with a view that upon comple- 
tion of a program the student will be prepared to pursue a professional 
career in engineering. 

It is the intent of the fifth-year program to emphasize professional course 
work rather than research. To this end, a curriculum is comprised of 30 
semester credits of course work requiring of the student a minimum of one 
academic year in residence. Neither a thesis nor a reading knowledge of 
a foreign language is required. Samples of curricula that meet the require- 
ments of the fifth-year program may be found under the appropriate de- 
partmental curricula. These curricula are to be considered illustrative; 
the actual program of study will be especially designed to fit the needs 
of the individual student. 

Admission 

Applicants who hold the bachelor's degree in engineering from recog- 
nized colleges will be admitted to the professional program of the School 
of Engineering upon presentation of official credentials. For unconditional 
admission, these credentials must show the completion, with a minimum 
grade point average of 2.5 (C-j-), of an amount of undergraduate work in 
the proposed field of professional study corresponding to that normally 
required for a bachelor's degree in that field. 

Admission on a provisional basis may be granted applicants who do not 
meet the formal requirements. In case of insufficient preparation, pre- 
requisite courses will be prescribed in addition to the normal fifth-year 
course requirements. 

Applications for admission, accompanied by full credentials in the 
form of transcripts of academic records, should be filed in the office of the 
dean of engineering at least 30 days in advance of the semester in which 
admission is sought. 

General Regulations 

The following regulations of the School of Engineering will be ob- 
served: 

1. An undergraduate enrolled at North Carolina State College, who 
plans to undertake a professional program and who has fulfilled all re- 
quirements for the bachelor's degree except one or two courses, may be 
permitted to enroll in certain courses and later obtain credit toward the 
professional degree provided the student gives notice of his purpose to 



Engineering 135 

the dean of the School of Engineering. The maximum credit to be obtained 
in this way is six semester course credits. 

2. Credit for professional work to be applied toward the requirements 
for the professional degree, not to exceed six semester credits, may be 
transferred to North Carolina State College from recognized institutions 
of university grade offering advanced work in engineering and related 
fields. Such a transfer of credit must be recommended by the head of the 
department in which the student does his major work and it must be 
approved by the dean of the School of Engineering. 

3. Fifth-year students are classified as post-baccalaureate students and 
are subject to rules and regulations as established and administered by the 
dean of the School of EnCTineerins;. 

4. Grades for each completed course are reported to the dean of the 
School of Engineering and to the Office of Registration. A minimum grade 
of C must be made in each course to obtain credit. A quality point aver- 
age of 2.5 (C+) in all course work must be attained to satisfy require- 
ments for a professional degree. 

5. W^ork completed more than six years prior to the date on which the 
professional degree is to be granted may not be used as credit toward 
the professional degree, unless approved by the head of the department 
concerned and the dean of the School of Engineering. 

6. Each fifth-year student will be assigned to a committee consisting of 
his department head and the professor in charge of the work in which he 
is majoring. The function of this committee is to assist the student in 
preparing a program of study and to counsel him in his academic work. 
The student will be required, with the assistance of his committee, to pre- 
pare a complete plan of study before mid-semester of his first semester in 
residence. This program of study is subject to the approval of the dean of 
the School of Engineering. 

Department' of Agricultural Engineering 

Professor F. J. Hassler, Head of the Department 

Te-achinc and Research 

Professors: 

H. D. BowEN, J. M. Fore, W. E. Splinter, Jan Van Schilfgaarde, John W. Weaver, Jr. 
Associate Professor: 

Ezra L. Howell 
Assistant Professors: 

George B. Blum, Jr., W. H. Johnson, K. A. Jordan, David A. Link, C. W. Suggs 
Instructors: 

E. O. Beasley, J. F. Beeman, E. G. Humphries, Edw.ard H. Wiser, F. Scott Wright 
Head Mechanic: 

Ralph B. Greene 
Extension 

Professor H. M. Eixis, In Charge 
Associate Professors: 

J. C. Fergi'son, R. M. Ritchie, W. C. Warrick 
Assistant Professor: 

J. W. Glover 
Instructor: 

R. E. Sneed 



134 The General Catalog 

Students in agricultural engineering are educated and trained to deal with 
the problems of agriculture that are engineering in nature. Involved are 
the application of scientific and engineering principles to the conservation 
and utilization of water and soil, the development of power and labor- 
saving devices for all phases of agricultural production, the design of 
structures and equipment for housing and handling livestock and field 
products, and the processing and marketing of farm products. 



Undergraduote Curriculum 

This curriculum, offered in conjunction with the School of Agriculture, 
is designed to develop young men capable of engineering leadership in 
agriculture. Emphasis is placed on basic science courses such as mathema- 
tics, physics, mechanics, biology, soils, and thermodynamics, which provide 
a sound background for engineering and agricultural technology. Courses 
in agricultural engineering are directed to those methods of thought and 
techniques whereby science can be applied with understanding and judg- 
ment to engineering situations in agricultural operations. General agri- 
culture courses are provided in order that the student can better under- 
stand the agricultural industry with which he deals. 

Since agricultural engineering involves two distinct technical fields- 
agriculture and engineering— this curriculum is a joint responsibility of 
the two schools and is so administered. 



Facilities 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering is housed in the Agricul- 
tural Engineering Building. This building, completed in 1960, embodies 
the most advanced facilities for education and research in the application 
of engineering to the production and processing of biological material for 
food and fiber. Included are offices, classrooms, laboratories, shop facili- 
ties, and space for the Agricultural Engineering Extension Service. 



Opportunities 

Men trained in agricultural engineering are qualified for positions in 
design, development and research in public institutions and in industry, 
and for teaching and extension work in institutions of higher education. 
The curriculum also provides adequate training for postgraduate work 
leading to advanced degrees. Graduates in this program receive the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in agricultural engineering. 



Engineering 



Agricultural Engineering Curriculum 



Freshman Year 



Fall Semester 

ENG 111, Composition 

MA 101. Algebra and Trigonometry 
ME 101, Engineering Graphics I — 
AGE 151, Farm Mechanics 



AG 103, Introduction to Agriculture 
MS 101, Military Science I 
or 

AS 121. Air Science I 

PE 101. Physical Education 



Credits 

... ... 3 

5 

2 

2 

1 



„ 1 
_ 1 



15 



Spring Semester 

ENG 112. Composition 

•MA 102, Analytic Geometry and 
Calculus I 



ME 102, Engineering Graphics II 

AGE 152. Farm Mechanics 

CH 101. General Chemistry I 

MS 102, Military Science I 
or 

AS 122. Air Science I 

PE 102, Physical Education 



. 1 

. 1 

17 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 103, General Chemistry II 4 

AGE 211, Farm Power and Machinery _ 3 
MA 201, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 

PY 201. General Physics I 5 

MS 201. Military Science II 

or 
AS 221. Air Science II 



PE 201. Physical Education 



- 1 

- 1 

18 



Spring Semester 

EM 200. Introduction to Mechanics 

CE 201, Surveying I 

MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus III 



PY 202. General Physics II 
MS 202, Military Science II 
or 

AS 222, Air Science II 

PE 202, Physical Education _ 



. 1 
. 1 

17 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 

EE 320, Elements of Electrical 

Engineering 

EM 301, Solid Mechanics 



ENG 231. Basic Speaking Skills __ 

SSC 200. Soils _ 

English Elective 
••Elective 



Credits 



20 



Spring Semester 

BO 103. General Botany 
EC 201. Economics 



EM 303. Fluid Mechanics I 

ME 301. Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics I ... 



MA 301, Differential Equations 
••Elective 



. 4 
. 8 
. 3 

. 3 
. 3 
- 3 

19 



• To be •ligible to roster courses taught by the School of Engineering above the freshman level, an 
engineering student must hove earned a minimum grade of "C" on MA 102. 
••ST 361, Introduction to Statistics for Engineers, and PY 407, Introduction to Modern Physics, are 
recommended for electives. 



136 



The General Catalog 



Senior Yeor 



Fall Semester Credits 

AGE 451, Conditioning Principles for 

Plant and Animal Systems 2 

AGE 462, Farm Power and Machin- 
ery IIA 4 



AGE 491, Rural Electrification _ 
AGE 552, Instrumentation for 
Agricultural Research 
and Processing 



PS 201, The American Governmental 
System 



RS 301, Sociology of Rural Life 
•Elective 



20 



Spring Semester 

AGO 212, Economics of Agriculture 

or 
AGC 551, Agricultural Production 

Economics 



AGE 371, Soil and Water Conserva- 
tion Engineering 

AGE 481, Agricultural Structures 

as Production Units 

AGE 452, Senior Seminar 

HI 261. The U. S. in Western 

Civilization 



Humanities Elective 
•Elective 



Credits 



21 



Graduate Study 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering offers advanced study 
leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in any one of five fields of 
specialization: power and machinery, rural structures, soil and water con- 
servation, rural electrification, or agricultural processing. 

The Master of Science program in agricultural engineering provides a 
broad background in science and engineering through advanced study 
in mathematics and physics. 

For those interested primarily in existing technology, a program of 
study for the Master of Agricultural Engineering degree permits selections 
from a variety of advanced application courses. This program provides 
training appropriate for those engaged in the dissemination of infor- 
mation either as extension workers with public institutions or service rep- 
resentatives for industry. It is not intended as preliminary study to the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree. 

Department- of Chemical Engineering 

Professor E. M. Schoenborn, Head of the Department 
Reynolds Professor: 

K. O. Beatty, Jr. 
Professor: 

James K. Ferrfjj. 
Associate Professors: 

R. Bright, J. F. Seely 
Assistant Professors: 

D. B. Marsland, E. p. Stahel 
Instructors: 

T. M. GoDBOLD, J. C. McGee 

Chemical engineering is concerned with the design of processes, equipment 
and plants in which chemical and physical transformations of matter are 
carried out. Typical industries relying heavily upon chemical engineering 



•ST 361, Introduction to Statistic* for Engineers, and PY 407, Introduction to Modem Physics, ar« 
recommended for electives. 



Engineewng 157 

include those producing chemicals, polymers, metals, drugs, glass, food, 
gasoline, paper, soap and cement; those producing energy from nuclear 
fuels; and those processing materials by methods involving chemical re- 
actions. The preparation of men qualified to pursue careers in such in- 
dustries as these is the purpose of the curriculum in chemical engineering. 

Curriculum 

The work of the chemical engineer is extremely diversified and con- 
sequently his education must be along broad and basic lines. The spirit of 
research and experimentation is a vital part of the chemical industry and 
even those in the undergraduate curriculum need to acquire the sound 
scientific background essential to original thought and independent ac- 
complishment. The undergraduate curriculum emphasizes the engineer- 
ing, the chemical, and the economic principles involved in chemical 
processes and operations. The work in chemistry including inorganic, 
analytical, physical, and organic chemistry is comparable to that usually 
given to chemists in the first three years with the exception of a reduction 
of time devoted to laboratory work. The subjects in mechanical and elec- 
trical engineering, in mechanics and metallurgy are designed to supply the 
fundamentals of these branches. The work in the chemical engineering 
subjects, although distinctly professional in application, is nevertheless 
basic in character. Since it depends upon a thorough background in the 
sciences, it is postponed until the third and fourth years. It is designed 
to develop initiative, sound habits of thought and intellectual curiosity in 
the student. 

Chemical engineers have played the biggest single role in the atomic 
energy field. The future of production of nuclear fuels, the operation and 
design of reactors, and the processing of irradiated materials present a 
multitude of chemical engineering problems. By judicious use of his elec- 
tives, the student in chemical engineering may obtain specialized knowl- 
edge in the area of nuclear engineering. 

Facilities 

The Chemical Engineering Laboratories are provided with pilot plant- 
type equipment for studying the principles of fluid flow, heat transfer, 
distillation, absorption, drying, crushing and grinding, filtration, agita- 
tion, etc. Much new equipment has been installed, and new and special 
apparatus is added from time to time to keep the facilities abreast of recent 
developments in the field. Special equipment for research and instructional 
purposes is designed and built in the departmental laboratories. In this 
way students are given first hand acquaintance with problems relating to 
the actual design, construction, and operation of typical equipment used 
in industry. 

Opportunities 

Opportunities for employment in the chemical, atomic energy, and allied 
fields upon graduation are numerous and varied. Graduates find employ- 



138 



The General Catalog 



merit in such fields as research and development; production, operation, 
and maintenance; management and administration; inspection, testing, 
and process control; technical service and sales; estimation and specification 
writing; consulting and teaching, and many others. Students desiring to 
pursue careers in research and development or in teaching and consulting 
work are strongly advised to consider training. In fact, the need for per- 
sons who have had advanced training in the field beyond the regular 
four-year program is continually increasing. 

Chemical Engineering Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page ISO. 



Sophomore Yeor 



Fall Semester Credits 

CHE 205, Chemical Process Principles _ 4 
•EC 205, The Economic Process 
or 

ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 3 

MA 201, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 



PY 201, General Physics 

MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 221, Air Science II 



PE 201, Physical Education 



Spring Semester 

CHE 311, Introductory Chemical 
Engineering 



18 



•ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 
or 

EC 205, The Economic Process 

MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus III 

PY 202, General Physics 

MS 202, Military Science II 
or 

AS 222, Air Science II 

PE 202, Physical Education 



Credits 



18 



Fall Semester 

CH 215, Quantitative Analysis 

CH 531. Physical Chemistry 

CHE 411, Unit Operations I 



EM 341, Engineering Mechanics A 
55 301, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Junior Year 



Credits 
4 



18 



Spring Semester 
CH 532, Physical Chemistry _ 
CHE 412, Unit Operations II 
EE 320, Elements of Electrical 
Engineering 



EM 342, Engineering Mechanics B 

EM 343. Strength of Materials A _ 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization . 

Elective 



Credits 
3 



20 



Fall Semester 

CH 425, Organic Chemistry 

CHE 415, Chemical Engineering 

Thermodynamics 

CHE 431, Unit Operations Lab I 
CHE 4G0, Seminar 



CHE 527, Chemical Process 
Engineering 



*SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 
or 
Elective in Humanities 
Elective 



Senior 

Credits 
3 



20 



Yeor 

Spring Semester 

CH 426, Organic Chemistry 

CHE 432, Unit Operations Lab II 
CHE 525, Process Measurement 

and Control 

MIM 321. Metallurgy 



*SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 
or 

Elective in Humanities 

Elective 



Credits 
3 



18 



See page 131 for information concerning the Humanities Sequence. 



Engineering 139 
Professional Curriculum (Typicol Program) 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 401, Special Topics in CHE 525, Process Measurement 

Inorganic Chemistry 3 and Control 3 

CHE 570, Chemical Engineering CHE 546, Chemical Reaction Rates 3 

Projects 2 CHE 570, Chemical Engineering 

CHE 610, Heat Transfer I 3 Projects 2 

CHE 660. Chemical Engineering CHE 613, Distillation 3 

Seminar I CHE 660, Chemical Engineering 

FY 407, Introduction to Modem Seminar 1 

Physics 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 



15 



15 



Groduate Study 

Regulations governing the professional program are shown on pages 132 
and 133. 

Graduate work is offered in chemical engineering leading to the de- 
grees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in chemical engi- 
neering. Superior students who can do so are strongly encouraged to spend 
one or more years in advanced study and research since the demand of the 
chemical industry for persons with training beyond the baccalaureate is 
continually increasing. 

The chemical engineering staff and research facilities provide unusual 
opportunities for basic and applied work in such important fields as fluid 
flow, heat transfer, distillation, diffusional operations, plastic technology. 
Of current interests are special programs in thermal properties of ma- 
terials at both high and low temperatures, in process measurement and 
control, the use of radioactive tracers in chemical engineering research, 
and condensation in a centrifugal force field. 

For general regulations, the Graduate School Catalog should be con- 
sulted. 

Department of Civil Engineering 

frofessor C. R. Bramer, Acting Head of the Department 
Professors: 

C. R. McCuLLOUCH, Carroll L. Mann, Jr., C. Smallwood, Jr., M. E. Uyanik 
Associate Professors: 

R. H. BicELow*, P. D. Cribbins, J. W. Horn, Paul Zlv 
Assistant Professors: 

Michael Amein, E. P. Br-^ntly, C. P. Fisher, Donald McDonald, H. E. "^Vahls 
Instructors: 

N. C. CosTES, G. N. Owen, Jr., J. B. Shuler, Oktay Ural 

Civil engineering is one of the broadest of the various fields of engineer- 
ing. It deals with the planning, design and construction of buildings, 
bridges, dams, harbor works, water works, water power facilities, selvage 
disposal works, nuclear waste facilities, missile launch facilities, and trans- 
portation facilities including highways, railways, waterways, airports, and 

• On leove. 



HO The General Catalog 

pipe lines. The civil engineer's services are in demand by public agencies 
as well as by private enterprise. The activities of the civil engineer are 
such that opportunities are available for office type as well as field-type 
employment and for employment in small communities as well as in large 
industrial centers. The breadth in scope of civil engineering and the variety 
of types of employment open to the civil engineer are such that a student 
who does not have a strong predilection for some special branch of engi- 
neering may be safely advised to study civil engineering. 

Objectives 

It is the primary mission of the Civil Engineering Department to offer 
programs of study designed to provide adequate academic preparation to 
those contemplating a career in the civil engineering profession. To this 
end, course work at both the baccalaureate and graduate levels is offered. 
The undergraduate program is designed to provide a sound general edu- 
cation and at the same time to prepare the student for advanced study in 
engineering either by the continuation of formal education at the gradu- 
ate level or by self-study. 

Facilities 

The Department of Civil Engineering is located in Mann Hall. This 
building provides offices, drafting rooms, and classrooms, as well as labora- 
tory facilities for testing structural materials, soils and bituminous prod- 
ucts; for hydraulic experiments; for studies in airphoto interpretation and 
photogrammetry; for analysis of structural models; for chemical and bio- 
logical tests pertaining to sanitary engineering; and for the investigation 
of transportation problems. In addition, the facilities of Mann Hall include 
a student study room, an auditorium and a departmental library. All of 
these facilities have been designed to provide for effective teaching and 
laboratory instruction and to create a scholarly environment. 

Undergraduate Curriculum 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers two four-year undergradu- 
ate curricula: the one, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in civil 
engineering; the other, to the degree of Bachelor of Science in civil engi- 
neering, construction option. 

The civil engineering curriculum has been accredited by the Engi- 
neers' Council for Professional Development. It is a well-balanced program 
of study providing academic discipline in the pure and applied physical 
sciences, the humanities and social sciences, and the professional aspects 
of civil engineering including structural, transportation, and sanitary engi- 
neering, and soil mechanics and foundations. 



Engineering 



141 



Civil Engineering Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 130. 

Fall Semester 



Sophomore Year 



CE 201, Surveying I 

MA 201, Analytical Geometry 

and Calculus II 

PY 201, General Physics 



•EC 205, The Economic Process 
or 

ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 
MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 221, Air Science II 

PE 201, Physical Education . . 



Credits Spring Semester 

-__ 3 CE 202, Surveying II 

EM 200, Introduction to Mechanics 

4 MA 202, Analytical Geometry 

5 and Calculus III 

PY 202, General Physics 



Credits 
3 



17 



•ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 

or 
EC 205, The Economic Process _ 
MS 202, Military Science II 

or 

AS 222, Air Science II 

PE 202, Physical Education 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 

CE 305, Transportation 

Engineering I 

CE 321, Materials Testing Lab I 
CE 382, Hydraulics 



EM 301, Solid Mechanics I 

MA 301, Differential Equations I 

SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 

Elective 



Credits 



Spritig Semester 

CE 306, Transportation 

Engineering II 

CE 322, Materials Testing Lab II 

CE 324, Structural Analysis I 

EM 302, Solid Mechanics II 

ME 301, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics I 



20 



SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



20 



Credits 



20 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester 

CE 425, Structural Analysis II 
CE 427, Structural Design I _ 
CE 442, Soil Mechanics 



CE 481, Hydrology and Drainage 
CE 492, Professional Practice I _ 
•SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 
or 
Elective in Humanities 
Elective 



Credits 
3 



19 



Spring Semester 

CE 428, Structural Design II 

CE 482, Water and Sewage Works 
CE 493, Professional Practice II _ 
EE 320, Elements of Electrical 
Engineering 



Credits 
3 



*SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 
or 

Elective in Humanities 

Elective 



17 



CONSTRUCTION OPTION 

Professor Carroll L. Mann, Jr., In Charge 

The curriculum in civil engineering construction option is designed to 
suit the needs of students who are especially interested in the construc- 
tion phases of civil engineering. It includes the core course requirements 



• See page 131 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



142 



The General Catalog 



in the physical sciences and the social sciences and humanities as estab- 
lished for all engineering curricula offered at North Carolina State Col- 
lege. It differs from the civil engineering curriculum in that special emphasis 
is given to the construction aspects of civil engineering. To this end the 
curriculum includes a four-semester sequence of courses in estimates and 
costs and construction planning and organization. The courses unique to 
this curriculum are designed to provide academic discipline in the engi- 
neering, planning, and management aspects of construction. 

Construction Option Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page ISO. 



Fall Semester 

CE 201, Surveying I 

MA 201, Analytical Geometry 

and Calculus II 

PY 201, General Physics 



•EC 205, The Economic Process 

or 
ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 
MS 201, Military Science II 

or 

AS 221, Air Science II 

PE 201, Physical Education 



Sophomore Year 



Credits 
3 



Spring Semester 

CE 202, Surveying II 

EM 200, Introduction to Mechanics 
MA 202, Analytical Geometry 

and Calculus III 

PY 202, General Physics 



Credits 
S 



17 



•ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 
or 

EC 205, The Economic Process 

MS 202, Military Science II 
or 

AS 222, Air Science II 

PE 202, Physical Education 



20 



Fall Semester 
CE 321, Materials Testing 
Laboratory I 



CE 361, Estimates and Costs I 

EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 
EE 320, Elements of Electrical 

Engineering 

EM 801, Solid Mechanics I 



SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Junior Year 



Credits 



21 



Spring Semester 
CE 322, Materials Testing 
Laboratory II 



CE 324, Structural Analysis I 

CE 362, Estimates and Costs II 
EM 302, Solid Mechanics II 



Credits 



ME 301, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics I 3 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization S 

Elective 3 



20 



Fall Semester 

CE 427, Structural Design I 

CE 461, Project Planning 

and Control I 

CE 485, Elements of Hydraulics 

and Hydrology 



CE 492, Professional Practice I . 

•SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 
or 
Elective in Humanities 
Elective 



Senior Year 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

4 CE 429, Structural Design III 3 

CE 443, Foundations 3 

3 CE 462, Project Planning 

and Control II 3 

3 CE 464, Legal Aspects of 

I Contracting 3 

*SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 
or 

3 Elective in Humanities 3 

3 Elective 3 



17 



18 



• See page 131 for information about thie Humanities Sequence. 



Engineering 



14$ 



Professional Study in Civil Engineering 

Fifth-year programs of study leading to the professional degree of Civil 
Engineer are offered in the following specialty fields: sanitary engineer- 
ing, soil mechanics and foundation engineering, structural engineering 
and transportation engineering. The fifth-year curricula, which are made 
up of advanced course work, are offered as a continuation of the four-year 
undergraduate program and are designed for students who are desirous 
of becoming technically proficient in one of the specialty fields of civil 
engineering. The following curricula are illustrative of the fifth-year pro- 
grams of study. It is to be understood, however, that a curriculum for a 
given student is designed in consultation with his adviser to suit his par- 
ticular interests. 

Regulations governing the professional program are shown on pages 
132 and 133. 



Sanitary Engineering Curriculum 



Professional 



Fall Semester 

CE 571. Theory of Water 

and Sewage Treatment 

CE 573, Analysis of Water 

and Sewage 



Credits 



CE 598, Civil Engineering Projects 
CE 671. Advanced Water Supply 

and Sewerage 

Elective 



Spring Semester 

CE 572, Unit Operations 

and Processes in 

Sanitary Engineering 

CE 598, Civil Engineering Projects 
CE 672, Advanced Water and 

Sewage Treatment 

Electives 



15 



Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering Curriculum 



Credits 



15 



Professional 



Fall Semester 

CE 525. Advanced Structural 
Analysis I 



Credits 



CE 548. Engineering Properties 
of Soils I 



CE 641. Advanced Soil Mechanics 
MA 405. Introduction to Deter- 
minants and Matrices _ 
Elective 



. 3 

. 3 

. 3 
. 3 

15 



Spring Semester 

CE 524. Analysis and Design 

of Masonry Structures _ 
CE 544, Foundation Engineering 
CE 549. Engineering Properties 

of Soils II 



CE 642, Advanced Soil Mechanics 
Elective 



Credits 



. 3 
. 3 
. 3 

15 



144 The General Catalog 



Structural Engineering Curriculum 



ProfessSonol 



Fall Semester 

CE 525, Advanced Structural 
Analysis I 

CE 625, Advanced Structural 
Design I . 



Credits 



EM 551, Advanced Strength 
of Materials 



MA 405, Introduction to Deter- 
minants and Matrices _. 
Elective 



Spring Semester 

CE 544, Foundation Engineering 
CE 626, Advanced Structural 

Design II 

CE 526, Advanced Structural 

Analysis II 

EM 602, Elastic Stability 

Elective 



15 



Tronsportation Engineering Curriculum 



Fall Semester 

CE 515, Transportation Operations 

CE 516, Transportation Design 

CE 603, Airport Planning 

and Design . 

Electives 



Professional 

Credits Spring Semester 

CE 601, Transportation Planning 



CE 602, Advanced Transportation 
Design 



15 



CE 604, Urban Transportation 

Planning 

Electives 



Credits 
3 



15 



Credits 
3 



15 



Graduate Study in Civil Engineering 

The graduate degrees offered by the Civil Engineering Department are 
the Master of Science in civil engineering and the Doctor of Philosophy. 
At North Carolina State College, facilities for research and graduate in- 
struction are available in the areas of sanitary engineering, soil mechanics 
and foundation engineering, structural engineering and transportation 
engineering. For additional information concerning graduate study op- 
portunities in civil engineering, the current issue of the Graduate School 
Catalog should be consulted. 



Post-Baccalaureate Study in Civil Engineering Related to Other Fields 

Transportation Engineering and City and Regionol Planning 

There exists a growing need for the coordination of transportation facili- 
ties and land planning and for individuals with competence in both fields. 
To fulfill this need, an advanced program leading to a post-baccalaureate 
degree in engineering, majoring in transportation 'Engineering, and to the 
degree of Master of Regional Planning is offered through the combined 
resources of the Department of Civil Engineering at North Carolina State 
College and the Department of City and Regional Planning at the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. Qualified students have the opportunity to schedule 



Engineering 145 

their courses of instruction to enable them to qualify for both advanced 
degrees. 

The program is designed for students who are desirous of becoming tech- 
nically proficient in both the fields of transportation engineering and city 
and regional planning. The minimum residence requirements include two 
academic years plus a summer internship. The curriculum includes the 
major core courses for both the advanced transportation engineering pro- 
gram and the city and regional planning program, plus supplementary 
courses important to both endeavors and a thesis. A bachelor's degree in 
engineering, including a knowledge of transportation engineering, from 
an institution of recognized standing is required for admission to the pro- 
gram. Applicants who do not meet these requirements in full may submit 
their credentials for examination and consideration. 

Further information concerning the joint program may be obtained from 
the Department of Civil Engineering at North Carolina State College or 
from the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of 
North Carolina. 

Water Supply ond Waste Treatment 

In recognition of the need by industry for personnel with training in 
water supply and the abatement of water pollution, the Civil Engineering 
Department suggests that students in the many curricula leading to posi- 
tions in industry (food processing, textile chemistry, pulp and paper tech- 
nology, chemical engineering, zoology and others) consider courses of 
instruction in sanitary engineering for advanced undergraduate electives, 
and minor sequences for advanced degrees. Among the courses appropriate 
for such students are the following: CE 482, Water and Sewage Works; 
CE 571, Theory of Water and Sewage Treatment; CE 573, Analysis of 
Water and Sewage; CE 673, Industrial Water Supply and Waste Disposal; 
and CE 674, Stream Sanitation. 



Department of Electrical Engineering 

Professor G. B. Hoadley, Head of the Department 
Professors: 

W. J. Barclay, A. R. Eckels, G. E. Schafer, W. D. Stevenson, Jr. 
Associate Professors: 

N. R. Rell, K. B. Glenn, A. J. Goetze, E. G. Manning, W. C. Peierson, E. W. Wineler 
Assistant Professor: 

F. L. Thurstone 
Instructors: 

D. I. Fairbanks, P. B. Johnson, F. S. Keblawi, T. E. McEnally, P. N. Marinos, J. Peng, 

W. P. Seacraves, T. B. Smiley 

The purpose of the undergraduate curriculum is to train young people, 
either for active work in a challenging and diversified field, or for further 
study on the graduate level. To achieve this a thorough grounding is given 
in engineering science, followed by a solid foundation in fundamental 
electrical theory, and by advanced subject matter of sufficient breadth to 



146 The General Catalog 

insure adequate preparation for a dynamic profession. This background 
is essential for success, whether the particular field be automatic control, 
computers, communications, telemetering, electronics, the design of elec- 
trical equipment, the manufacture of electrical equipment, electric power 
production, the utilization of electric power, electronics in medicine, in- 
strumentation or any other one of the vital fast developing fields using 
electricity either as muscles or as nerves. 

Curriculum 

The curriculum in electrical engineering includes comprehensive train- 
ing in mathematics and physics— the fundamental sciences— and adequate 
training in allied branches of engineering. Most courses are accompanied 
by coordinated work in the laboratory and drill in the application of 
theory by means of carefully planned problems. 

Each student has a choice of at least two out of eight senior elective 
courses in the department, and also has a choice of four courses from any 
of the offerings at State College. Near the end of the sophomore year, each 
student is asked to consider his electives and to plan a coordinated pro- 
gram of courses suited to his particular needs and interests. 

Examinations are given each week to sophomore students in the electri- 
cal engineering course. In the junior year, examinations are given every 
three weeks, and in the senior year, they are given about every five weeks. 
This decreasing frequency of examinations is intended to encourage the 
student to assume more and more responsibility for the success of his own 
program. 

Facilities 

The Electrical Engineering Department is housed in Daniels Hall. In 
addition to offices and classrooms this building provides laboratories for 
the study of servomechanisms and control, electronics and communications, 
circuits, instrumentation, illumination, computers, and electrical machin- 
ery. There are also a student study room, a shop, and a number of research 
laboratories. 

Also available to the student are the services of an IBM 650 computer 
for research. 



Graduation Requirements 

Requirements for graduation are passing grades in the courses listed in 
the electrical engineering curriculum, passing of 147 credit hours, a grade 
point average of 2.00 or better, demonstration of proficiency in written 
English, tested in the junior year. Students receiving D grades in both 
ENG 111 and ENG 112 will be required to repeat ENG 111. 

Attendance at two professional electrical engineering society meetings 
of state-wide or larger scope, once in the spring of the junior year and 
once in the fall of the senior year, is required. Attendance at the three 



Engineering 147 

subsection meetings is considered the equivalent of one state-wide meet- 
ing, in meeting this requirement. 

Also a minimum of six continuous weeks of gainful employment is 
required. This employment may be as laborer, sub-professional, or profes- 
sional assistant in any of the following fields: industrial manufacturing, 
repair service, or sales; industrial engineering or scientific research; engi- 
neering or architectural design and drafting; engineering exploration, 
surveying, or reconnaissance; construction of engineering works. Techni- 
cal work while in military service or for a school does not satisfy this 
requirement. 

The student is responsible for obtaining his employment and supplying 
satisfactory evidence thereof to the department. This evidence will consist 
of a letter from the employer to the head of the department setting forth 
inclusive dates of employment; character of work performed; and an evalu- 
ation of the student's work. 

Student Activities 

Close coordination with the work of the professional electrical engineer- 
ing societies is maintained through the AIEE-IRE Joint Student Branch 
which meets twice a month. Faculty advisers assist the students in bring- 
ing to these meetings practicing engineers. The Joint Student Branch also 
sponsors departmental activities such as picnics for new students and de- 
partmental participation in the Engineers' Fair. 

An active chapter of Eta Kappa Nu, the national honorary electrical 
engineering fraternity, undertakes numerous important projects in addi- 
tion to holding two initiation banquets yearly. 



Electrical Engineering Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 130. 

Sophomore Yeor 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

••EC 205, The Economic Process 3 ••ENG 205, Reading for Discovery . 3 

EE 201, Elementary Circuits EE 202, Elementary Circuits 

and Fields 4 and Fields 4 

MA 201, Analytic Geometry MA 202, Analytic Geometry 

and Calculus II 4 and Calculus III 4 

PY 201, General Physics 5 PY 202, General Physics 5 

•MS 201, Military Science II 'MS 202, Military Science II 

or or 

•AS 221, Air Science II 1 •AS 222, Air Science II 1 



•PE 201, Physical Education 1 'PE 202, Physical Education 1 



18 18 



• Students excused from military or air science and/or physical education will schedule equivalent 
credits outside their departments. 
** See page 131 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



148 



The General Catalog 



Fall Semester 

EE 301, Intermediate Circuits and 
Fields 



EE 305, Electrical Machinery 

EM 200, Introduction to Mechanics 

MA 301, Differential Equations 

SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 



Junior Year 

Credits Spring Semester 

EE 302, Intermediate Circuits 

and Fields 

EE 314, Electronics .___ 



17 



4 

4 

3 EM 301, Mechanics I (Solids) 

3 

3 



»*PS and AM Elective 



SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Credits 



19 



Fall Semester 

EE 411, Electrical Engineering 
Senior Seminar 



EE 401, Advanced Circuits and 
Fields 



ME 301, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics I 

•Senior Humanities . 



Departmental Elective 

•••PS and AM Elective 
Elective 



Senior Year 



Credits 



. 3 
- 3 

19 



Spring Semester 
EE 402, Advanced Circuits 
and Fields 



EM 321, Strength of Materials I 
ME 303, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics III 



•Senior Humanities _ 
Departmental Elective 
Elective 



Credits 

3 

5 



18 



Professional Degree 

A fifth, or professional, year of study is offered in electrical engineering 
as a continuation of the four-year undergraduate program. This fifth year 
of study offers specialized and advanced course work leading to the degree 
of electrical engineer. Each student taking this fifth year work has his 
program of courses planned to meet his individual needs. Regulations 
governing the professional degree are shown on pages 132 and 133. 

Graduate Study 

The Department of Electrical Engineering offers the Master of Science 
and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Graduate work in electrical engi- 
neering at the first-year or master's level is limited to one or two areas of 
specialization. In the more advanced study for the doctorate a comprehen- 
sive understanding of all fields of electrical engineering is required, and 
specialization appears in the research problem undertaken. 

Advanced courses of a general and fundamental nature, such as electric 
network synthesis and electromagnetic waves, are recommended for all 
graduate students in electrical engineering, and are required of those who 
plan to carry their advanced studies to the level of the doctorate. Minor 
sequences of study in advanced mathematics or physics are planned to fit 
the needs of individual students. 



• See page 131 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 
•• To be chosen from MA 302, 401, 405, 511 or 522 or PY 407 or ST 361, PY 552. 
•••To be chosen from MA 302, 401, 405, 511 or 522 or ST 361, PY 552. 



Engineering 149 

Recipients of graduate degrees in electrical engineering at North Caro- 
lina State College are in continual demand. Alumni hold important posi- 
tions in the research laboratories of industry, government, and universi- 
ties, in the teaching profession, and in the administrative and engineering 
departments of manufacturing corporations, utility companies, and gov- 
ernment agencies. 

For further information concerning graduate study in electrical engi- 
neering, the current Graduate School Catalog should be consulted. 



Department* of Engineering Mechanics 

Professor P. H. McDonald, Head of the Department 
Professor: 

Adolphus Mitchell 
Associate Professors: 

M. H. Clayton, R. A. Douglas, John E. Gruhih 
Visiting Associate Professor: 

Shou-Ling Wang 
Assistant Professors: 

J. A. Edwards, J. P. Lamb, G. W. Middleton 
Instructors: 

James U. Crowder, Jr., Joe W. Reece* 

In a large portion of the contemporary engineering world there is a distinct 
requirement for persons whose educational background encompasses con- 
centrated study within the broad domain of engineering science, persons 
with the ability to analyze as well as synthesize across-the-board modem- 
age complexes. Such a diversified background— which demands vigorous 
preparation in those disciplines concerned with macroscopic as well as 
microscopic behavior of matter— is provided in the curriculum adminis- 
tered by the Department of Engineering Mechanics. 

Graduates of this interdisciplinary engineering sciences program will 
discover wide vistas of professional opportunity including teaching, funda- 
mental engineering research, and applied research-development. In addi- 
tion, those who desire to pursue their formal education to the master and 
doctoral level will find that the engineering mechanics program provides 
a very sound foundation for graduate study in engineering. 

Aside from its own undergraduate program the department fulfills an 
important service function in the engineering school as a whole by pro- 
viding a core of fundamental courses— in solid and fluid mechanics— for 
other undergraduate engineering curricula. 

On the graduate level the department offers a full slate of courses cover- 
ing the basic principles of generalized continuum mechanics along with 
the more specialized areas of solid and fluid mechanics. These courses have 
been designed to be useful to those who desire to concentrate in mechanics 
as well as those whose primary field of study requires a rigorous back- 
ground in some phase of mechanics. 

* On leave 



150 The General Catalog 
Curriculum 

The undergraduate program in engineering mechanics provides concen- 
tration in solid and fluid mechanics, microscopic behavior of materials, 
thermodynamics and transport phenomena, electric-magnetic circuits and 
fields in addition to a foundation of classical and modern physics, mathe- 
matics, chemistry, and humanities-social studies. 

In the senior year these diverse studies are brought to bear on typical 
contemporary engineering systems in which interactions of many physical 
phenomena must be considered. Senior elective sequences in space mechan- 
ics and systems analysis-synthesis are also available. 

Facilities 

The Engineering Mechanics Department is housed in Riddick Labora- 
tories Building. The department's laboratories include instruments and 
apparatus for studying the prime variables of mechanics and the pheno- 
mena in which they occur. Special emphasis is placed on the theory of 
transducers and sensors such as accelerometers, hot wire anemometer, load 
cells, pressure probes, electric resistance gages, and the associated recording 
apparatus. Equipment is available to analyze the behavior of gyroscopes, 
the stress and strain optic tensors, yielding experiments, and the propaga- 
tion of wave motion in solids; streamline patterns, pressure distributions, 
shock wave configurations, and boundary layer profiles. 



*Engineering Mechanics Curriculum 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry _ 4 CH 103, General and Qualitative 

HI 205, The Modern Western World _ 3 Chemistry 4 

ENG 111, Composition 3 ENG 112, Composition 3 

E 100, Introduction to Engineering 1 MA 201, Analytic Geometry and 

MA 102, Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 4 

Calculus I 4 PY 201, General Physics 5 

ME 102, Engineering Graphics II 2 MS 102, Military Science 1 

MS 101, Military Science I or 

or AS 122, Air Science I 1 

AS 121, Air Science I 1 PE 102, Physical Education 1 

PE 101, Physical Education _ ._ _ 1 



19 



18 



• This curriculum is effective beginning September, 1963. Prior to then, the curriculum will 
employ a transitional freshman year in common with all engineering curricula as found on 
page 130. 



Engineering 



151 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 

EE 201, Elementary Circuits 
and Fields 



ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 
MA 202, Analytic Geometry 

and Calculus III . 

PY 202, General Physics 

MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 221. Air Science II 

PE 201, Physical Education 



Fall Semester 

EE 414, Electronics 

EM 301, Solid Mechanics I 

EM 303, Fluid Mechanics I 

MA 405, Introduction to Determi- 
nants and Matrices 

ME 301, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics I 



SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 



Fall Semester 

EM 401, Experimental Mechanics I 

Curricula Elective (Mechanics) 

MA 512, Advanced Calculus II 

or 
ST 362, Statistics for Engineers __ 

ME 502, Heat Transfer 

Elective 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

EE 202, Elementary Circuits 
and Fields 



18 



EC 205, The Economic Process 

MA 301, Differential Equations 

MIM 201, Structure and Properties 
of Engineering Materials 
EM 200, Introduction to Mechanics . 
MS 202. Military Science II 
or 

AS 222, Air Science II 

PE 202, Physical Education 



Credits 



Junior Year 



Credits 

3 

3 

3 



Spring Semester 

EM 302, Solid Mechanics II _ 
EM 304, Fluid Mechanics II _ 
MA 511, Advanced Calculus I 

or 
ST 361, Statistics for Engineers 
ME 302, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics II 



18 



SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Senior Year 



Credits 

3 

3 



Spring Semester 

EM 402, Experimental Mechanics II 

Curricula Elective (Mechanics) 

SS 491, Contemporary Issues 

Electives 



15 



18 



Credits 

S 

3 



18 



Credits 

3 

3 

3 

__ 6 



15 



Graduate Study 

The Department of Engineering Mechanics offers graduate studies lead- 
ing to the degree of Master of Science. 

Studies in mechanics at the graduate level normally will include initial 
courses in the areas of both solids and fluids to augment contemporary 
offerings in continuum mechanics. These courses provide a background 
suitable for subsequent specialization in such fields as elasticity, plasticity, 
or vibrations in solid mechanics; ideal viscous, or compressible fluid flow; 
as well as in the more generalized behavior of matter encountered in the 
study of rheology. 



152 The General Catalog 

Recipients of advanced degrees in mechanics are in demand for research 
and development endeavors in the engineering field, in the establishments 
of both private industry and government. Increasing numbers of these 
men are choosing the opportunities afforded as members of the faculties 
of engineering schools and colleges. 

Department- of Engineering Research 

N. W. Conner, Director 
Research Professors: 

R. F. Stoops, H. H. Stadelmaier 
Research Associate Professors: 

F. M. Richardson, Hayne Palmour III 
Research Associates: 

R. R. Brose, S. W. Derbyshire, A. E. Lucier 
Visiting Research Associate: 

J. D. SCHOBEL 

Research Assistants: 

A. C. Fraker, J. V. Hamme, G. E. Scott, R. B. Moffitt, J. Singletary, Jr., Ernest Harri- 
son, Jr. 
Industrial Extension Service 
Research Professor and Head: 

W. C. Bell 
Research Engineers: 

J. R. Ocburn, W. G. Yamamoto 
Research Associates: 

S. D. Coward, L. B. McGee, J. R, Hart 
Chemical Engineer: 

J. A. Macon 
Industrial Specialist: 

F. L. Earcle 
Minerals Research Laboratory 
Chief Engineer: 

W. T. McDaniel 
Ore Dressing Engineers: 

I. Redeker, T. J. Wright 
Chemical Engineer: 

P. N. Sales 

The Department of Engineering Research gives strong support and en- 
couragement to the many research programs conducted within the School 
of Engineering. The establishment and maintenance of the top-rate De- 
partment of Engineering Research is a true sign that the College and the 
School of Engineering are fully aware of the contributions research makes 
to effective teaching. 

The School of Engineering, a part of North Carolina's Land-Grant Col- 
lege, serves the industrial life of the State by offering a broad program of 
service and experimental aid through its Department of Engineering Re- 
search. Many State industries bring problems to the school and the asso- 
ciation between the department and the State industries is being strength- 
ened constantly. The department's service is further strengthened through 
its close cooperation with the North Carolina Department of Conserva- 
tion and Development. Particular encouragement and assistance are 
granted investigations that give promise to new North Carolina industry. 



Engineering 153 

Facilities 

The Department of Engineering Research, established originally in 
1923 as the Engineering Experiment Station, maintains laboratories and 
a fulltime staff which devotes its time exclusively to experimental work. 
The department's operations are carried out in close cooperation with the 
administration and faculties of the teaching departments. The abilities of 
the various departments of engineering are combined through the depart- 
ment so that the complete research capacity of the School of Engineering 
is available for experimental work in any field. The department also acts 
as the administrator for the school in negotiations involving research pro- 
grams done for private industry and for governmental agencies. 

The Minerals Research Laboratory in Asheville is engaged in the ex- 
pansion of North Carolina mineral production through facilities for the 
development of improved processes of mineral concentration, or exami- 
nation and appraisal, and chemical analysis. 

The Industrial Extension Service was created by the 1955 General As- 
sembly. Its objective is to provide technical assistance to the State's small 
industry and to promote utilization of its natural resources. 

Research Programs 

The research capacity of the nation is being used for national security. 
Research facilities of colleges and universities are utilized for defense 
work. The School of Engineering at North Carolina State College is play- 
ing a leading roll in the area of national security. Several research pro- 
grams sponsored by the government agencies have been in progress for 
several years; the school's capacity for expanded service is large. 

Research in progress includes work being done for the Air Material 
Command of the U. S. Air Force, the Office of Ordnance Research, the 
Bureau of Ships, the Wright Air Development Center, Redstone Arsenal, 
and the Texas Company. Work is included in the fields of structural day 
products, radiant heating, stress analysis, rotational speed deviation meas- 
urements, tannin extraction, recovery from fish waste, erosion of plastics, 
fuel oils, precipitation hardening and diffusion in alloys and electronics. 

Upon their conclusions, results of the engineering investigations are 
published as bulletins so that the information obtained is available to the 
public and is contributed to the total field of technical knowledge. A com- 
plete list of the bulletins published to date or any other information per- 
taining to the operation or availability of the facilities of the department 
will be furnished upon request. 

Research Fellowships 

To assure wider benefits for both graduate and undergraduate students 
from the engineering research activities, the department offers several re- 
search fellowships and employs some of the more promising and deserving 
students as assistants in the laboratory on a part-time basis. 



154 The General Catalog 

Department of Industrial Engineering 

Professor Clifton A. Anderson, Head of the Department 
Professors: 

R. G. Carson, Jr., R. W. Llewellyn 
Visiting Professor: 

R. WlLLARD 

Assistant Professors: 

•R. Alvarez, R. L. Cope, C. E. Hunter 
Instructors: 

BiMAN Das, *H. A. Knappenberger, A. L. Prak, G. E. Tucker, W. Woo 

Industrial engineering is a relatively new branch of the engineering pro- 
fession. It has seen its greatest growth beginning with the industrial expan- 
sion in the war years. As a college curriculum, industrial engineering is 
the result of a demand by industry for graduates who are trained in the 
fundamentals of engineering and who have acquired a knowledge of the 
principles involved in planning, operating, and controlling the operation 
of an industrial enterprise. 

Curriculum 

It is the industrial engineer's job to transform plans, specifications and 
blueprints into plant, equipment and personnel to create the product. He 
is concerned also with controls and plans for the profitable and continued 
operation of an existing plant. 

The industrial engineering program at North Carolina State College 
has been planned with this viewpoint in mind. After the first year, which 
is common with all other branches of engineering, the curriculum includes 
subject matter in industrial organization and management, motion and 
time study, plant layout, quality control, job evaluation, accounting per- 
sonnel and labor relations and production control together with other 
specialized courses which help develop a background and technique for 
understanding our modern industrial system. 

The industrial engineering curriculum has been inspected and accre- 
dited by the Engineers* Council for Professional Development. 

Graduation Requirements 

A minimum of six weeks of continuous, gainful employment is re- 
quired. This employment may be any level from laborer to supervisor. 
The work performed should be related to industrial activities concerned 
primarily with production and manufacturing, maintenance, or manage- 
ment control functions. The student assumes responsibility for obtaining 
his own employment and making arrangements with his employer to pro- 
vide evidence thereof to the head the Industrial Engineering Department. 
A letter from the employer stating the extent and dates of employment, a 
description of work performed, and an evaluation of the student's per- 
formance is suitable evidence. In general the student should plan to take 
such employment between his junior and senior years. 

* On leave 



Engineering 



155 



Student Activities 

Student organizations within the department include a chapter of the 
American Institute of Industrial Engineers. This student function has 
demonstrated its calibre by ranking high in the Annual Student Award 
every year in competition with the AIIE chapters at other institutions. 
Departmental and student activities of a professional and a social character 
are sponsored by the organization. 

An active chapter of Alpha Pi Mu, the industrial engineering honor 
society, gives recognition to the outstanding students in the junior and 
senior classes. The membership annually undertakes projects of value to 
industrial engineering students and the department. 

Industrial Engineering Curriculum 

For the freshman year sec page ISO. 



Fall Semester 

•HI 205. The Modern Western 
World 
or 
EXG 205, Reading for Discovery . 
IE 201, Industrial Engineering I 

IE 217. Machine Tools 

IE 218, Metal Forming 



MA 201, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 

PY 201, General Physics 

MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 221. Air Science II 

PE 201, Physical Education 



Sophomore Year 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

•ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 

or 
HI 205, Modern Western World _ 
IE 202, Industrial Engineering II 
MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus III 

PY 202, General Physics 



Credits 



_ 4 
_ 5 

PSY 200, Introduction to Psychology 3 

MS 202. Military Science II 
or 

AS 222, Air Science II 1 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 



20 



19 



'Junior Year 



Fall Semester 

EC 312, Accounting for Engineers . 

EM 341, Mechanics A (Statics) 

IE 303, Industrial Engineering III 
MA 301, Differential Equations I . 
SS 301, Contemporary Civilization . 
ST 361, Statistics for Engineers __ 
Elective 



CrediU 

3 

2 

4 

3 

3 

3 

3 



21 



Spring Semester 

EM 342, Mechanics B (Dynamics) 

IE 303, Industrial Engineering TV 

•••MA 405, Introduction to Determi- 
nants and Matrices 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilizntion 

•••ST 362, Statistics for Engineers _ 
Elective 



Credits 

2 

4 



18 



* See page 131 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 
•* Proficiency in written expression to be demonstrated at the beginning of the [unior year. Students 
who fail this test are required to take additional work in the English Department as recommended 
by the Industrial Engineering Deportment head. 
•*• At the end of the sophomore yeor, students In the Industrial Engineering curriculum will be 
permitted to choose between two sequences of four courses each in their junior and senior yeors. 
The sequences ore (1) Math 405, ST 362, IE 401, and IE 402; and (2) MIM 201, IE 350. IE 
404, IE 5 '5. The first sequence is designed to emphasize mothemoticol techniques in management 
decision making. The second series emphasizes work relating to production and monufocturing 
engineering. More octive participation in the technicol aspects of planning, tooling, and improving 
manufacturing operations will be expected from graduates who take the latter sequence. At least 
one of the above sequences must be completed to fulfill graduation requirements. 



156 



The General Catalog 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester 

EE 331, Principles of Electrical 
Engineering 



EM 343, Strength of Materials A 
••IE 401, Industrial Engineering 

Analysis 

IE 451, Seminar 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

EE 332, Principles of Electrical 
Engineering 



Credits 



••IE 402, Industrial Engineering 
Analysis 



ME 301, Engineering Thermodynamics _ 3 

•SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 
or 

Humanities Elective 3 

Elective 3 



•SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 
or 

Humanities Elective 

Technical Elective 

Elective 



16 



19 



Professional Sf-udy 

A fifth, or professional year of study is offered in industrial engineering 
by means of specialized and advanced course work. A student may elect a 
speciality area in consultation with his adviser and then develop a pro- 
gram of study which suits his interests. A student may specialize in produc- 
tion engineering, in decision-making processes as related to industrial en- 
gineering, or in administrative engineering. Typical programs in each of 
these areas are presented below. This fifth year of study leads to the pro- 
fessional degree in industrial engineering. Regulations concerning the 
professional program are shown on pages 132 and 133. 



Producfion Engineering 



Fall Semester 

IE 515, Process Engineering 

IE 517, Automatic Processes 

ST 515, Experimental Statistics 

for Engineers 

Elective 



Credits 

3 

3 



Spring Semester 

IE 404, Introduction to Tool 

Engineering 

IE 543, Standard Data 



IE 581. Project Work 



. 4 

. 8 
-2 

15 



IE 546, Advanced Quality Control 
IE 581, Project Work 



Credits 



-_ 3 
_ 3 
_ 3 
_ 3 



ST 516, Experimental Statistics 
for Engineers 



15 



• See page 131 for informotion about the Humanities Sequence. 

•• At the end of the sophomore year, students in the Industrial Engineering curriculum will be permitted 
to choose between two sequences of four courses each in their junior and senior years. The sequences 
ore (1) Math 405, ST 362, IE 401, and IE 402- and (2) MIM 201, IE 350, IE 404, IE 515. The first 
sequence is designed to emphasize mathemotical techniques in management decision making. The 
second series emphasizes work relating to production and manufacturing engineering. More active 
participation in the technical aspects of planning, tooling, and improving manufacturing operations 
will be expected from graduates who take the latter sequence. At least one of the obove sequences 
must be completed to fulfill graduation requirements. 



Engineering 



157 



Industrial Engineering 



Fall Semester 

IE 521, Control Systems and 

Data Processing 

IE 651, Special Studies in 

Industrial Engineering 

ST 515, Experimental Statistics 

for Engineers 

Electives 



Credits 

3 

3 



_ 4 

_ 5 



Spring Semester Credits 

IE 546. Advanced Quality Control 3 

IE 621, Inventory Control Methods 3 

IE 651, Special Studies in Indus- 
trial Engineering 3 

ST 516, Experimental Statistics 

for Engineers 3 

Elective 3 



15 



15 



Administrative Engineering 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



EC 504, Principles of Cost Accounting _ 3 
EC 525. Management Policy and 

Decision Making 3 

EC 531, Management of Industrial 

Relations 3 



ST 515, Experimental Statistics 

for Engineers 

Elective 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

EC 505, Principles of Cost Accounting _ 3 
IE 531, Quantitative Job 

Evaluation Methods 3 



IE 546, Advanced Quality Control 
IE 551, Standard Costs for 
Manufacturing 



ST 516, Experimental Statistics 
for Engineers . 



15 



Graduate Study 

For general regulations, the Graduate School Catalog should be con- 
sulted. Graduate work is offered in industrial engineering leading to the 
degree of Master of Science in industrial engineering. 



FURNITURE MANUFACTURING AND MANAGEMENT 

Any curriculum in the School of Engineering has as an aim the prepara- 
tion of men capable of handling the technical problems arising in the 
jobs which they undertake. Where industry is already equipped with 
qualified engineers, the new employee with a basic engineering education 
can be given on-the-job training in analyzing and solving the special prob- 
lems peculiar to the particular plant or industry. 

In the case of the furniture industry, practically no experienced engi- 
neers exist. To be of service, the College must emphasize to a greater 
extent the application of engineering principles to the problems of the 
furniture industry. This can be done effectively only if the instructional 
staff is aware of the problems of the industry from direct contact and not 
merely from the academic discussion and the available literature. Conse- 
quently, the program has been worked out in conjunction with repre- 
sentatives of the manufacturers. Their viewpoint is based on a survey 
made among the entire membership of the Southern Furniture Manufac- 
turers' Association. Results of the survey indicate an overwhelming in- 
terest in college training to prepare men for work in this industry. 



158 The General Catalog 



Curriculum 



It is the purpose of the curriculum offering the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in furniture manufacturing to prepare graduates for technical and, 
eventually, executive positions in the furniture industry. The curriculum 
emphasizes the application of engineering to furniture manufacturing. 
Related subjects covering management, labor relations, accounting, market- 
ing and sales stress the technical as well as the human side of modem 
production methods and techniques. 

Graduation Requirements 

A minimum of six weeks of continuous, gainful employment is required. 
This emplo^Tnent may be at any level from laborer to supervisor. The 
work performed should be related to industrial activities concerned pri- 
marily with production and manufacturing, maintenance, or management 
control functions in a furniture manufacturing plant. The student assumes 
responsibility for obtaining his own employment and making arrangements 
with his employer to provide evidence thereof to the head of the Industrial 
Engineering Department or the professor in charge of the Furniture Manu- 
facturing and Management curriculum. A letter from the employer stating 
the extent and dates of employment, a description of work performed, and 
an evaluation of the student's performance is suitable evidence. In general 
the student should plan to take such employment between his junior and 
senior years. 

Student Activities 

The Industrial Engineering Department sponsors the Furniture Club, 
which is operated by the students. All students in the curriculum are eligi- 
ble for membership in the organization. The club brings in speakers from 
industry and holds social gatherings for the students. 

Furniture Manufacturing and Management Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 130. 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 231. Basic Speaking Skills 3 ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 3 

HI 205, The Modern Western World 3 lA 203, Technical Sketching 2 

PH 201, Logic 3 FOR 201, Wood Properties 3 

PSY 200, Introduction to Psychology _ 3 IE 224, Wood Working Equipment 3 

PY 211, General Physics 4 PY 212, General Physics 4 

MS 201, Military Science II MS 202, Military Science II 
or or 

AS 211. Air Science II 1 AS 222, Air Science II 1 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 PE 202, Physical Education 1 

18 17 



Engineering 



159 



Summer Practicum 



FOR 205-s. 206-s. 207-s, 208-s. 209-5 



'Junior Yeor 



Fall Semester 

FOR 301, Wood Processes I 

IE 322, Furniture Design and 
Construction 



IE 332, Motion and Time Study _ 
SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 
Electives 



Fall Semester 

IE 341, Furniture Plant Layout 
and Design 



IE 420, Manufacturing Controls 
IE 451, Seminar . 



••SS 491, Contemporary Issues I . 

ST 361, Introduction to Statistics 

for Engineers 

Elective 



Credits 
4 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 3 

IE 301, Engineering Economy 3 

IE 326, Furniture Manufacturing 

and Processing . 4 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 3 

TX 271, Upholstery Fabrics 2 

Electives 3 



18 



Senior Year 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

EC 432, Industrial Relations 

IE 443, Quality Control 

IE 452, Seminar 



Technical Elective „... 
Humanities Elective ._ 
Elective 



Credits 

3 

3 

1 

3 

3 

3 



16 



16 



Department of Mechanical Engineering 

Professor R. \V. TRurrr, Head of the Department 
Professors: 

N. VV. Conner, J. S. DooLrrrLE, K. P. Hanson, H. A. Hassan, R. B. Knight, R. M. 

PiNKERTON, J. WOODBURN 

Associate Professors: 

W. E. Adams, M. R. El-Saden, B. H. Garcia, R. S. Lee, F. O. Smetana, J. K. Wnrr- 

FIELD***, J. C. ^VILLIAMS III, J. T. YeN, C. F. ZOROWSKI 

Assistant Professor: 

T. B. Ledbetter 
Instructors: 

R. F. Barrett, D. G. Bassett, N. M. Beatty, T. Cebeci, K. R. Crump, A. H. Eraslan, 

J. Manzo, p. S. Nye, L. J. Pavacadhi, C. S. Rudisill, E. H. Stinson, C. O. Taylor, B. D. 

Webb 

Engineers are motivated by a desire to satisfy human needs through the 
application of scientific principles in such a manner as to place the fruits 
of their work within the economic reach of vast segments of humanity. To 
identify and evaluate human needs, modem engineers must have a sound 
education in the basic sciences, mathematics, and the humanities. The gap 
between the discoveries of basic science and their application in the satis- 
faction of human needs is provided by an area of science known as the 



• Proficiency in written expression to be demonstrated at the beginning of the junior year. Students 
who fail this test are required to take additional work in the English Department as recommended 
by the Industrial Engineering Department head. 
** See page 131 for information obout the Humanities Sequence. 
•*• On leave 



160 The General Catalog 

engineering sciences. It is with education in the engineering sciences and 
the development of talent in applying the principles of the engineering 
sciences that departments of engineering are principally concerned. 

Mechanical engineering covers a broad spectrum of engineering respon- 
sibility in such areas as nuclear and conventional power generation, mis- 
siles, rockets, jet engines, propulsion systems for land, sea, and air vehicles, 
refrigeration, air conditioning, combustion of fuels, instrumentation of 
industrial processes, solar energy, and the design of a wide variety of tech- 
nical systems. Aerospace engineering shares responsibility with mechanical 
engineering for many of the areas described above but is principally con- 
cerned with the structural design and analysis of air and space vehicles 
and with the phenomena of air and space flight. 

Because of the close relationship between mechanical and aerospace 
engineering, both curricula are administered by the Department of Me- 
chanical Engineering at North Carolina State College. There is close co- 
operation between the faculties of the two disciplines in which responsi- 
bility for such engineering sciences as thermodynamics, heat transfer, mass 
transfer, gas dynamics, aeroelasticity, vibrations, lubrication, fluid me- 
chanics, magnetohydrodynamics, aerodynamics, and instrumentation theory 
are shared. 

In cooperation with other departments in the School of Engineering 
the Department of Mechanical Engineering is prepared to offer work lead- 
ing to a degree in nuclear engineering. Particular emphasis in the work 
of this department is placed on nuclear power, reactor heat transfer and 
the dynamics of reactor fluids. 

Curriculum 

The curriculum in mechanical engineering is based on a firm foundation 
in mathematics, physics, chemistry, humanities and social sciences. The 
student's knowledge in the basic engineering sciences germane to mechani- 
cal engineering is carefully developed in the courses offered in this de- 
partment and other departments of the School of Engineering. Finally, the 
curriculum provides an active experience in which the student's creative 
talents and imagination are challenged in several areas of application. This 
experience is gained through a choice of courses in the senior year and 
required courses in experimental mechanical engineering. 

The curriculum in aerospace engineering is administered as an option 
in mechanical engineering. Generally speaking, the curricula in mechani- 
cal and aerospace engineering differ slightly in the first three years. The 
point of departure occurs in the fourth year where the emphasis in the 
aerospace engineering curriculum is placed on air and space structures 
and the aerodynamics of air and space vehicles. 

The four-year undergraduate curricula in both mechanical and aero- 
space engineering prepares graduates who are equipped to profit from 
their experiences in the practice of engineering and to become early con- 
tributors in the solution of engineering problems of scientific and eco- 
nomic complexity. Both curricula offer a firm basis for further advanced 
study in graduate schools. 



Engineering 



161 



Mechanical Engineering Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 130. 



Fall Semester 

•ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 
or 

EC 205, The Economic Process 

IE 217, Machine Tools 



MA 201, Analytical Geometry 

and Calculus II 

PY 201, General Physics I 

MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 221, Air Science II 

or 

PE 201, Physical Education 

Elective 



Sophomore Year 



Credits 



18 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



EM 200, Introduction to Mechanics 

•EC 205, The Economic Process 

or 

ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 

IE 218, Metal Forming 

MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus III 

PY 202, General Physics II 

MS 202, Military Science II 

or 
AS 222, Air Science II 



PE 202, Physical Education 



. 1 
- 1 

18 



Junior Yeor 



Fall Semester Credits 

EM 301, Solid Mechanics I 3 

MA 301, Differential Equations I 3 

ME 301, Engineering Thermodynamics I 3 
ME 305, Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory I 1 

ME 311, Kinematics 3 

SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 3 

Elective 3 



19 



Spring Semester 

EM 303, Fluid Mechanics I 

ME 302, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics II 



ME 306, Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory II 

ME 312, Dynamic Analysis 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Credits 
S 



18 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester 

EE 331, Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 

ME 401, Power Plants 



ME 405, Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory III ._ 

ME 411, Machine Design I 

ME 441, Technical Seminar 

MIM 421. Metallurgy I 



Credits 



•SS 491. Contemporary Issues I 
or 

Elective in Humanities 

Elective 



20 



Spring Semester 

EE 332, Principles of Electrical 
Engineering 



Credits 



ME 406, Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory IV 

ME 412, Machine Design II 

ME 502, Heat Transfer 

MIM 422, Metallurgy II 



MIM 423, Metallurgy Laboratory 
•SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 
or 
Elective in Humanities 
Elective 



20 



See page 131 for information about the Humonities Sequence. 



162 The General Catalog 

Aerospace Engineering Option Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 130. 



Sophomore Yeor 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



•ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 

or 

EC 205, The Economic Process -— 3 

IE 217, Machine Tools 1 

MA 201, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II - 4 

PY 201, General Physics I 5 

MS 201, Military Science II 

or 

AS 221, Air Science II 1 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 

Elective 3 



18 



Spring Semester 

EM 200, Introduction to Mechanics 
*EC 205, The Economic Process 

or 
EXG 205, Reading for Discovery — 
IE 218, Metal Forming 



Credits 
3 



MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus III - 4 

PY 202, General Physics II 5 

MS 202, Military Science II 
or 

AS 222, Air Science II 1 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 



If 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 

EM 301, Solid Mechanics 

MA 301, Differential Equations _ 
ME 301, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics I 

ME 305, Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory I 

ME 311, Kinematics 



Credits 

3 

3 



_ 1 
.... 3 

SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 3 

Electi\e 3 



19 



Spring Semester Credits 

ME 361, Aerospace Technolog)' 3 

ME 302, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics II 3 

ME 306, Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory II 1 

ME 352, Aerodynamics 3 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 3 

Elective 6 



19 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

EE 320, Elements of Electrical 

Engineering 4 

ME 441, Technical Seminar 1 

ME 465, Aerospace Engineering 

Laboratory 1 

ME 469, Spacecraft Structures 3 

ME 471, Aircraft and Missile Design 3 



MIM 421, Metallurgy I 



2 



•SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 
or 
Elective in Humanities 
Elective 



20 



Spring Semester Credits 

ME 421, Aerospace Propulsion Systems - 3 
ME 446, Performance of Hypervelocity 

Vehicles 3 

ME 466, Aerospace Engineering 

Laboratory 1 

ME 472, Spacecraft Design 3 

MIM 422, MetaIkn■g^• II 2 

MIM 423, Metallurg)- Laboratory 1 

•SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 
or 

Elective in Humanities 3 

Elective - 3 



19 



See page 131 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



Engineering 



163 



Professional Study 

A fifth, or professional year of study is offered in mechanical engineering 
for graduates who desire to return to the university for a program of con- 
centrated study in a selected area. This program is intended primarily for 
practitioners and is, in no sense, a graduate program leading to the usual 
advanced degrees. The degree of mechanical engineer is conferred upon 
graduates of the fifth-year program. Typical programs are listed below. 



Heat-Power 



Fall Semester 



ME 501, Steam and Gas Turbines . 
ME 545, Project Work in Mechanical 

Engineering I 2 

ME 601, Advanced Engineering 

Thermodynamics I S 

ME 603, Advanced Power Plants 3 

ME 641, Mechanical Engineering 

Seminar I 1 

Approved Elective 3 



Credits Spring Semester Credits 

— 3 ME 521, Aerothermodynamics 3 

ME 546, Project Work in Mechanical 
Engineering II 



ME 604, Nuclear Power Plants 

ME 642, Mechanical Engineering 
Seminar II 



Approved Electives 



15 



15 



Design 



Fall Semester 

MA 411, Introduction to Applied 
Mathematics 



Credits 



ME 515, Experimental Stress Analysis _ 3 
MIM 521, Advanced Physical 

Metallurgy I 3 

ME 545, Project Work in Mechanical 

Engineering I 2 

ME 611, Advanced Machine Design I 3 

ME 641, Mechanical Engineering 

Seminar I 



1 



15 



Spring Semester 

EM 554, Vibration Problems 

ME 517, Lubrication 

MIM 522, Advanced Physical 
Metallurgy II 



Credits 

3 

3 



ME 546, Project Work in Mechanical 
Engineering II 



ME 612, Advanced Machine Design III _ 3 
ME 642, Mechanical Engineering 

Seminar II I 



15 



Aerospace 



Fall Semester 

ME 453, Applied Aerodynamics 
ME 502, Heat Transfer „ 



Credits 



ME 552, Aircraft Applied Loads 

ME 545, Project Work in Mechanical 

Engineering I 

ME 641, Mechanical Engineering 

Seminar I 



Approved Elective 



. 1 
- 3 

15 



Spring Semester 

ME 502, Heat Transfer 
ME 554, Advanced Aerodynamic 
Theory 



ME 546, Project Work in 

Mechanical Engineering II 2 

ME 562, Advanced Aircraft Structures _ 3 
ME 642, Mechanical Engineering 

Seminar II 1 

Approved Elective 3 



15 



164 The General Catalog 

Graduate Study 

The purpose of graduate study in mechanical engineering is to prepare 
students for a career in research, development, and teaching. Hence, in 
addition to advanced study, research is an essential part of the graduate 
program. At present the Department of Mechanical Engineering offers the 
Master of Science degree in mechanical and aerospace engineering and 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree in mechanical engineering. Since all 
graduate programs are administered by the Graduate School, prospective 
applicants should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 

Deparfment of Mineral Industries 

Professor W. W. Austin, Head of the Department 
Professors: 

W. C. Bell, W. W. Kriegel. J. M. Parker, III, H. H. Stadelmaier, R. F. Stoops 
Associate Professors: 

H. C. Brown, W. C. Hackler, C. J. Leith, Haynb Palmour, III 
Visiting Research Associate: 

J. D. SCHOBEL 

Instructors: 

G. O. Harrell, L. E. Poteat, J. M. Waller 

The primary' objectives of the Department of Mineral Industries are the 
training and professional development of qualified technical and adminis- 
trative leaders for those industries concerned with the location and utili- 
zation of mineral resources. Included within this scope of operation are 
the fields of geological, ceramic, and metallurgical engineering. 

Curricula 

Complete four-year undergraduate curricula in geological, ceramic, and 
metallurgical engineering are available in the department. Fifth year pro- 
fessional programs also are available for advanced work and specialization 
in each of these fields, and graduate programs leading to the master's and 
doctor's degree in ceramic engineering, and to the master's degree in 
geological engineering and metallurgical engineering are offered. 

Facilities 

The facilities of the Department of Mineral Industries are housed in 
Page Hall and the Ceramic Building. Located in Page Hall are depart- 
mental offices, drawing rooms, classrooms and extensive laboratory facili- 
ties for instructional work and research in the three areas of study covered 
by the department. Typical of the numerous well equipped laboratories 
in the building are those established for instruction in the following areas 
of study— ceramic operations and processes, dielectric measurements, ceram- 
ic microscopy, physical geology, mineralogy, mineral dressing, petrology, 
physical metallurgy, and metallography. Other laboratory facilities, par- 
ticularly kilns and furnaces, are housed in the Ceramic Building next 
door. Important additional facilities for instruction and research are lo- 
cated in the Engineering Research Department's Ceramic and Metallurgi- 



Engineering 165 

cal Research Laboratories. Here equipment and instrumentation are avail- 
able for advanced work in high temperature technology, X-Ray diffraction, 
differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, radiography, elec- 
tron microscopy, and photomicrography. 

Student Activities 

The student branches of the American Ceramic Society, American So- 
ciety for Metals, and the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical 
and Petroleum Engineers through their monthly meetings provide an effec- 
tive medium for the professional growth of the student engineers. Pro- 
grams include presentation of student papers, guest speakers and social 
contact between student and staff. Participation acquaints the student with 
parliamentary and organizational procedures which are of great importance 
to professional, industrial and civic life. Students are encouraged to attend 
local section and national meetings of their respective societies. Keramos, 
the oldest professional engineering fraternity and Alpha Sigma Mu, hon- 
orary metallurgical fraternity, have active chapters in the department. 
These fraternities are dedicated to the promotion of scholarship, mental 
achievement and general service to ceramic and metallurgical engineering 
students. 

CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

The undergraduate curriculum in ceramic engineering is the result of 
years of study and development and is designed to meet the challenges of 
modem civilization. The program of study encompasses a thorough ground- 
ing in the basic physical sciences and the fundamental disciplines of engi- 
neering. Processes and operations peculiar to ceramic engineering are 
developed from the viewpoint of interpreting and applying the underlying 
scientific laws, rather than empirical methods of procedure. The pheno- 
mena studied include crushing, grinding, classification and pack states of 
particle aggregations, rheological properties and plastic and non-plastic 
masses, suspensions and slurries, drying of solids, combustion, heat trans- 
fer, and high temperature chemical reactions. Production at lowest possible 
cost and design and improvement of processes and operations are empha- 
sized throughout the program. Attitudes of research, experimentation and 
originality of thought are fostered. 

Because the department is dedicated to training young men for leader- 
ship, and because of the recognition that responsible leadership should be 
vested in thinking, well-oriented men, the curriculum includes a planned 
program of social and humanistic studies. This program is designed to 
prepare the student for an understanding and appreciation of his respon- 
sibilities to society, his profession, and himself, to the end that he will lead 
a fuller, more productive and satisfying life. 

Opportunities 

Professional training in ceramic engineering provides opportunities for 
employment in an industry producing a wide variety of essential products 



166 The General Catalog 

including glass in all its forms, enamels and protective coatings for metals, 
structural clay products such as brick and tile, refractories for furnace 
linings, thermal insulators, electrical insulators, dielectric components, 
Portland cement, gypsum products, abrasives, dinnerware, art pottery, bath 
fixtures, and hundreds of other items. In addition to these "end products" 
ceramics are finding ever increasing applications in the electronic, aero- 
space, automotive and atomic energy fields. A continuing shortage of quali- 
fied personnel in ceramic engineering has resulted in far more employment 
offers than there are graduates. Initial employment upon graduation may 
be in the fields of research and development, in plant operation and con- 
trol, and in technical sales and service. Such employment may lead to posi- 
tions as directors of research, consulting and design engineers, sales direc- 
tors, plant superintendents, production managers, and finally administra- 
tive officers. 

GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

Geological engineering is a technical field in which geological facts are 
combined with engineering techniques for the solution of problems con- 
cerned mainly with mineral raw material supply and with engineering 
projects. Many major engineering undertakings, such as construction of 
large dams and reservoirs, tunnels, and large buildings, depend for success 
in part on an exact knowledge of their geological setting. On the other 
hand, such geological problems as the economical development of mineral 
resources require the use of the precise methods of engineering. In the 
field of geological engineering, then, geology contributes data concerning 
the constitution, structure and history of the earth; engineering supplies 
quantitative, analytical methods whereby physical and chemical laws may 
be controlled for mankind's benefit. The geological engineering curric- 
ulum combines those fundamental disciplines regarded as basic to all engi- 
neering with training in the aspects of geology that are of most practical 
application to human affairs. 

Opportunities 

A graduate in this curriculum may follow one of two broad fields of 
engineering, either in the United States or in foreign countries: one, the 
application of geology to engineering work: the other, the application of 
geology in the mineral industries. Geological engineers are currently em- 
ployed by oil companies and quarrying concerns; exploration companies; 
construction firms; railroads, public utilities, banks and insurance com- 
panies; iron, steel and other metal producers; manufacturers using non- 
metallic mineral raw materials, as for ceramics, cement, and abrasives; 
municipal, state and federal government agencies; schools, colleges, mu- 
seums and research institutes. The Southeastern United States offers ex- 
cellent opportunities for geological engineers. There is a growing need 
for the application of geological science to engineering construction in 
connection with highways, foundations, excavations, and in water supply 
problems. The mineral industry of the Southeast has expanded substanti- 



Engineering 167 



ally in the last decade; kno^vn deposits in the region, as yet only partially 
developed, include iron, nickel, copper, chromite, molybdenite, feldspar, 
mica, kaolin, kyanite, sillimanite, pyropyhllite, talc, barite, spodumene, 
sulphur (pyrite), coal, phosphate, granite, limestone, and marl. 



METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 

The undergraduate curriculum in metallurgical engineering is a stan- 
dard four-year program designed to produce technically trained leaders 
for those industries and agencies associated with the development, pro- 
duction, and fabrication of metals and alloys. The major emphasis is on 
the application of the principles of physical and mechanical metallurgy 
to engineering problems encountered in these industries. Major sequence 
courses for the development of this emphasis are offered during the third 
and fourth years of the curriculum and are preceded by a well rounded 
program of basic and engineering sciences, and humanities. Because of 
this arrangement it is possible for a student to complete the first two years 
of his training at a suitably qualified liberal arts college and to transfer to 
North Carolina State College for the final two years. While such an ar- 
rangement is encouraged it is nevertheless advisable for the prospective 
transfer student to seek the guidance and counsel of the Engineering 
School administration at the beginning of his college career in order to 
minimize difficulties associated with the transfer of credits. The metal- 
lurgical engineering curriculum is unique in the School of Engineering 
in that it provides a minor sequence of 12 credits in a related field of 
engineering or science to be elected by the student with his adviser. 



Opportunities 

Opportunities open to graduates in metallurgical engineering are vir- 
tually unlimited. Each year the demand for men with metallurgical train- 
ing becomes more urgent, and the number of positions presently available 
is several times greater than the number of graduates. A graduate metal- 
lurgical engineer may thus choose from a wide selection of companies, 
locations and types of work. Among the more important job opportuni- 
ties open to metallurgical engineers are those in research and development 
of new alloys so desperately needed as materials of construction in the 
rapidly expanding fields of chemical, mechanical, aero-space and nuclear 
technology. With the rapid industrialization of the South and particularly 
the State of North Carolina, new opportunities are constantly developing 
for metallurgical engineers who will play a vital role in maintaining the 
forward progress of the State and region. 



168 



The General Catalog 



Ceramic Engineering Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 130. 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 

••HI 205. Modem Western World 

or 
ENG 205, Reading for Discovery — 
MA 201, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 

PY 201, General Physics 



Credits 



•MIN 201, Structure and Properties 
of Engineering Materials _ 
MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 211, Air Science II 

PE 201, Physical Education 



Spring Semester 

••HI 205, Modern Western World 
or 

ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 

MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 

PY 202, General Physics 



CH 215, Quantitative Analysis 
MS 202, Military Science II 
or 

AS 212, Air Science II 

PE 202, Physical Education _ 



17 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 

CH 341, Physical Chemistry 

EM 341, Mechanics A (Statics) . 
MIC 301, Ceramic Operations I 

MIG 120, Physical Geology 

MIG 330, Mineralogy 



SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Credits 

3 

2 

4 

8 

_ 3 

3 

3 



Spring Semester 

CH 342, Physical Chemistry 
EM 342, Mechanics B (Dynamics) 
EM 343, Strength of Materials A . 
MIC 302, Ceramic Operations II _ 
MIC 312, Ceramic Process 

Principles I 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 

Elective 



Credits 



18 



Credits 

3 
2 
2 
3 



21 



20 



Summer Requirement 

Six weeks' industrial employment 



Senior Year 



Fall Semest^ 



Credits 



MIC 413, Ceramic Process Principles II_ 4 
MIC 415, Ceramic Engineering Design _ 2 

MIC 420, Industrial Ceramics 3 

MIC 425. Seminar . 1 

MIG 531, Optical Mineralogy 3 

••SS 491, Contemporary Issues 
or 

Humanities Elective 

Elective 



. 3 
. S 

19 



Spring Semester 

EE 320, Elements of Electrical 

Engineering 

MIC 414, Senior Thesis 



Credits 



MIC 416, Ceramic Engineering Design _ 2 
MIC 505, Research and Control 

Methods S 

••SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 



Humanities Elective 
Elective 



18 



• Transfer students who have satisfactorily completed the equivalent of all first and second year 
courses except MIM 201, and who con present acceptable electives in lieu of this course will be 
admitted as third year students in ceramic engineering. They will be permitted to take this course 
in addition to the regular third yeor program, substituting it for three credits of elective permitted 
in the third year. 
•* See page 131 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



Engineering 



169 



Professional Year 

A fifth, or professional year of study is offered in ceramic engineering 
as a continuation of the four-year undergraduate program. This profes- 
sional year of study offers specialized advanced course work leading to the 
degree of Ceramic Engineer, and is especially designed for those planning 
careers in industrial production activities and technical service and sales. 
Each program of study is designed to suit the needs of the individual stu- 
dent. The curriculum shown below is typical of these programs. 
Regulations covering professional study are shown on pages 132 and 133. 

Typicol Professional Program in Ceramic Engineering 



Fall Semester 



Credits 
— 3 



IE 408, Production Control 

MIC 507, Advanced Ceramic 

Experiments 3 

MIC 511, Advanced Studies in Firing 3 

Electives 6 



15 



Spring Semester 

IE 332, Motion and Time Study 
MIC 508, Advanced Ceramic 

Experiments 
MIC 527, Refractories in Service 

Electives 



Credits 
4 

- 3 
3 
5 



15 



Geological Engineering Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 130. 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 

MA 201, Analytical Geometry and 
Calculus II 



Credits 



PY 201, General Physics 5 

MIG 220, Physical- Historical Geology _ 4 

EC 205, Economic Process 3 

PE 201, Physical Education I 

MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 221, Air Science II 1 



Spring Semester 

MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus III .._ 

PY 202, General Physics 

EM 200, Mechanics I ..._. 

ENG 205, Reading for Discovery . 

PE 202, Physical Education 

MS 202, Military Science II 

or 
PE 212, Physical Education 



Credits 

4 

5 



18 



. 1 
17 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 431, Physical Chemistry I 3 

EM 301, Solid Mechanics I 3 

SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 3 

MIG 331, Crystallography & 

Optical Microscopy 4 

CE 201, Surveying I 3 



16 



Spring Semester 

CH 433, Physical Chemistry II 

EE 320, Elements of Electrical 

Engineering ._. 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 

MIG 440, Endogenic Materials and 

Processes 

Elective 



Credits 
3 

4 

3 

4 

3 

17 



170 



The General Catalog 



Summer Session 

MIG 456, Geological Field Procedures 



Fall Semester 

CE 382. Hydraulics 

SS 491, Contemporary Issues 

MIG 351, Tectonic Structures 

MIG 452, Exogenic Materials and 

Processes 

Elective 



Senior Yeor 



Credits 
3 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 
Humanities Elective 3 

•MIG 415, Mineral Exploration and 

Evaluation . 3 



•MIG 552, Exploratory Geophysics 
Electives 



15 



Professionol Study 

A fifth or professional year of study is offered in geological engineering 
as a continuation of the fourth-year undergraduate program. This fifth 
year of study offers specialized and advanced work leading to the degree 
of Geological Engineer. Regulations covering professional study are shown 
on pages 132 and 133. 



Typical Professional Program in Geological Engineering 



Fall Semester 

MIG 461, Engineering Geology 
MIG 571, Mining and Mineral 
Dressing 



Credits 
3 



MIG 581, Geomorphology 

MIG 611, Advanced Economic Geology _ 
Elective 



3 

3 
3 
3 

15 



Spring Semester 

MIG 522, Petroleum Geology 

MIG 552, Exploratory Geophysics 
MIG 572, Mining and Mineral 
Dressing 



Credits 
3 



MIG 612, Advanced Economic Geology 
Elective 



15 



Metollurgical Engineering Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 130. 



Fall Semester 

••HI 205, Modern Western World 



ENG 205. Reading for Discovery _ 

MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 



Sophomore Year 

Credits Spring Semester 

**HI 205, Modern Western World 



PY 201, General Physics 

•••MIM 201, Structure and Properties 
of Engineering Materials I 
MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 221, Air Science II 

PE 201, Physical Education 



_ 4 
_ 5 



ENG 205, Reading for Discovery _ 
MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus III 

PY 202, General Physics 

MS 202, Military Science II 
or 

AS 222, Air Science II 

PE 202, Physical Education 

Elective 



Credits 



17 



17 



* Specialization in engineering geology or in geology of mineral deposits may be achieved by an 
opproved substitution of the following courses: CE 547 Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics; MIG 461 
Engineering Geology; MIG 472 Elements of Mining Engineering. 
** See page 131 for information about Humanities Sequence. 
*•* Transfer students who have satisfactorily completed the equivalent of all first and second year 
courses except MIM 201, and who can present acceptable electives in lieu of this course will 
be admitted as third year students in metallurgical engineering. They will be permitted to take 
this course in addition to the regulor third year program, substituting it for three credits of 
electives permitted in the third year. 



Engineering 



171 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 431, Physical Chemistry 3 

EM 341, Mechanics A (Statics) 2 

IE 217, Machine Tools 1 

IE 218, Metal Forming 1 

MIM 331, Physical Metallurgy I 3 

SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 3 

Minor Sequence Courses 3 

Elective 3 



Spring Semester 

CH 432, Physical Chemistry 

EM 342, Mechanics B (Dynamics) 
EM 343, Strength of Materials ___. 
MIM 332, Physical Metallurgy II _ 
SS 302, Contemporary Civilization . 
Minor Sequence Courses 
Elective 



Credits 

3 

2 

2 

3 



19 



19 



Summer Requirement 

Six weeks' industrial employment 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester 

EM 430, Fluid Mechanics 

MIM 401, Metallurgical Operations 

MIM 431, Metallography 

MIM 451, Seminar 

•SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 
or 
Humanities Elective 



Credits 

2 

_ 4 

3 

1 



Minor Sequence Course 
Elective 



Spring Semester Credits 

EE 320, Electrical Engineering 4 

MIM 402, Metallurgical Operations 4 

MIM 432, Metallography 3 

MIM 452, Seminar 1 

•SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 
or 
Humanities Elective 3 



Minor Sequence Course 



19 



18 



Professional Study 

A fifth, or professional year of study is offered in metallurgical engi- 
neering as a continuation of the four-year undergraduate program. This 
professional year of study offers specialized advanced course work leading 
to the degree of Metallurgical Engineer, and is especially designed for 
those planning careers in industrial production activities and technical 
service and sales. Each program of study is designed to suit the needs of 
the individual student. The curriculum shown below is typical of these 
programs. 

Regulations covering professional study are shown on pages 132 and 133. 



• See page 131 for information obout Humanities Sequence. 



172 The General Catalog 

Typical Professional Program in Metallurgical Engineering 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MIM 521, Advanced Physical MIM 522, Advanced Physical 

Metallurgy 3 Metallurgy 3 

MIM 523. Metallurgical Factors MIM 524. Metallurgical Factors 

in Design 3 in Design 



MIM 445. Experimental Engineering _ 3 MIM 446, Experimental Engineering _ 3 

PY 407. Modern Physics 3 CHE 502, Electrochemical Engineering 3 

ME 502. Heat Transfer 3 ME 515, Experimental Stress Analysis _ 3 

15 15 

Deporf-ment of Nuclear Engineering 

Professor H. A. Lamonds. Head of the Department 

The field of nuclear engineering is concerned with the engineering aspects 
of the control, release and utilization of nuclear energy. Many of the bene- 
fits which mankind stands to receive from the peaceful applications of 
nuclear power are already clear. These include improved medical diag- 
nosis through the use of radioisotopes, superior plant development by radi- 
ation induced mutations, rapid and precise measurement techniques using 
radiation and perhaps best known, production of electrical power from 
nuclear energy. It is the aim of the department to educate individuals in 
the scientific and engineering principles essential to the nuclear engineer- 
ing field and to prepare them to contribute to the efficient and productive 
use of nuclear energy through their work in the field. 

Curriculum 

Nuclear engineers are called upon to participate in a wide variety of 
highly sophisticated work, generally of an interdisciplinary nature. The 
curriculum is designed to provide training in the fundamentals of nuclear 
engineering with particular emphasis on the reactor field. The fact that 
an unusually high percentage of nuclear engineers continue or return to 
graduate study suggests that the program be aimed at a fifth year of study 
leading to the Master of Science degree. Minor adjustments are incor- 
porated, however, to facilitate the student's terminating his work at four 
years with a Bachelor of Science degree. When one considers that nuclear 
engineers may be involved with every phase of the reactor field includ- 
ing research, development, functional design, production design, manu- 
facturing, installation and marketing, it becomes clear that a single engi- 
neer cannot be trained to be proficient in all of these areas. On the other 
hand many fundamentals are common to most phases of the reactor field 
and certain general areas may be identified as basic. 

Fundamental course work is provided in four such areas: reactor theory, 
reactor energy transfer, electronics, and materials. In addition to this 
broad basic study, the students will be required to select an area of special- 
ization providing further study in the following areas: energy transfer, 



Engineering 178 

nuclear instrumentation and nuclear materials. Once a student has chosen 
his specialized area, he will be expected to complete a series of technical 
elective courses covering twelve credit hours. The three sequences offered 
are as follows: 

Energy Tronsfer 

Heat transfer, fluid mechanics and thermodynamics as applied to removing energy from a 
nuclear reactor. 

Credits 

ME 503, Elements of Nuclear Power Generation I 3 

ME 504, Elements of Nuclear Power Generation II 3 

CHE 551, Thermal Problems in Nuclear Engineering 3 

Free technical elective 3 

Nuclear Instrumentation 

Study of the special problems and techniques used in controlling and instrumenting reactors. 

Credits 

EE 430, Essentials of Electrical Engineering 4 

EE 511, Electrical Engineering 
or 

EE 515, Elements of Control 3 

EE 518, Instrumentation and Control in Nuclear Technology 3 

Free technical elective . 2 

Nuclear Materials 

Selection and control of properties of materials used in the radiation environment. 

Credits 

MIM 331. Physical Metallurgy I 3 

MIM 332, Physical Metallurgy II 3 

MIM 431. Metallography I 3 

MIM 562, Materials Problems in Nuclear Engineering 3 

At the end of the sophomore year, all students are required to select 
their area of emphasis. The technical elective sequence specified for each 
area of emphasis assures that the stated objectives will be met once the 
choice is made. In addition to the technical sequence, students receive a 
thorough foundation in basic science and mathematics, followed by courses 
in reactor theory and engineering. 

Facilities 

Facilities available on campus for nuclear training at the undergradu- 
ate level as well as the graduate level include: 
A 10 KW heterogeneous reactor 
A 100 watt homogeneous reactor 
Analog and digital computers 
A sub-critical assembly 

Single and multi-channel pulse height analyzers 
Neutron Diffraction equipment 
A slow chopper 
Radiation counting laboratories 



174 



The General Catalog 



Opportunities 

Although the nuclear industry is relatively young, it already represents 
a major national effort. Reactor development and construction has pro- 
ceeded at a remarkable pace and will continue to grow as we become more 
and more dependent on nuclear energy as a substitute for energy from 
fossil fuels. Industrial applications of radiation will accelerate as the eco- 
nomic potential of such methods becomes more firmly established. There 
is at present a substantial need for nuclear engineers and prospects for 
the future are promising. 

Nuclear Engineering Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 130. 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 

PY 201, General Physics 

MA 201, Analytical Geometry 

and Calculus II 

MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 221, Air Science II 



Credits 



PE 201, Physical Education 

ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 

MIM 201, Structures and Properties 

of Engineering Materials 

SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 



Spring Semester 

PY 202, General Physics 

MA 202, Analytical Geometry 
and Calculus III _ 
MS 202, Military Science II 

or 
AS 222, Air Science II 



Credits 
5 



PE 202, Physical Education 



1 

1 

HI 205, The Modern Western World _ 3 

EM 200, Introduction to Mechanics 8 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 8 



20 



20 



Fall Semester 

PY 407, Introduction to Modem 

Physics 

EM 301, Mechanics I 



MA 301, Differential Equations . 
EE 331, Principles of Electrical 
Engineering 



Junior Year 

Credits Spring Semester 

PY 410, Nuclear Physics I 
3 EE 332, Principles of EE 



CHE 421, Reactory Energy Transfer I 
Elective 



Credits 
4 



CHE 422, Reactor Energy Transfer II 

Technical Elective 

Elective 



17 



19 



Fall Semester 

SS 491, Contemporary Issues _ 
NE 501, Nuclear Engineering 
Systems I 



•MA 511, Advanced Calculus I 
Technical Electives 
Elective 



Senior Yeor 



Credits 
3 



18 



Spring Semester 

••Humanities Elective 

NE 502, Nuclear Engineering 
Systems II 



Credits 
8 



NE 503, Nuclear Reactor Theory I 8 

NE 531, Elementary Nuclear Reactor 

Laboratory 1 

Technical Elective 8 

Elective 8 



16 



'Students with less than "B" average in mathematics should register for MA 401. 
See page 131 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



Engineering 175 

CURRICULUM IN ENGINEERING OPERATIONS 

Professor R. G. Carson, Jr., Coordinator 

The Bachelor of Science program in Engineering Operations is for students 
with talents and motivations in the directions of the engineering functions 
of production, plant operations, technical sales and the other jobs needed 
to support the modern-day economy in an industrial society. The program 
has essentially the same freshman year as the other engineering curricula, 
follo^ved by a concentration of mathematics and physical science, the hu- 
manities-social studies stem included in all other engineering programs, a 
grounding in the basic engineering sciences and a specialization sequence. 
The specialization sequence \\'\\\ consist of eighteen semester hours in the 
junior and senior years. The plan is to develop several specialization se- 
quences oriented toward specific industries or careers. Thus, the student 
need not make a final choice of his specialization sequence until his junior 
year. Two sequences— industrial metallurgy and production control— are 
now available. Additional sequences are expected to be developed in other 
areas by the 1964-65 school year. Since this program is directed more to- 
ward industry than some of the other engineering programs, it includes 
more courses on economics, materials, processes and manufacturing con- 
trols. The freshman and sophomore years are offered now with the junior 
year to be added in 1964-65 and the senior year in 1965-66. The student is 
to choose one of the technical elective sequences listed on page 76. The 
choice should be made by the junior year. 

Engineering Operations Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 130. 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EC 205, Economic Process 3 ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 3 

PY 212, or 208, General Physics 4(5) EC 310, Economics of the Firm 3 

MIM 201, Introduction to Engineering ME 207, Graphical Communications 2 

Materials 3 EM 212, Mechanics of Engineering 

EM 211, Introduction to Applied Materials 3 

Mechanics 3 MS 202, Military Science 

MS 201, Military Science or 

or AS 221, Air Science I 

AS 221, Air Science I PE 202, Physical Education 1 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 

13 

15 
Proficiency in written expression is to be demonstrated at the beginning of the junior year. 

Students who fail this test are to be required to take additional work in the English Depart- 
ment and to repeat the tests. 

Junior Year Required Courses (Tentotive) 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ME 307, Energy & Energy Transform. 3 IE 328, Manufacturing Processes 3 

EE 350, Electrical Applications 3 SS 302, Science & Civilization 3 

SS 301, Science & Civilization 3 EC 426, Personnel Management 

ST 361, Introduction to Statistics for or 

Engineers I „ 3 EC 431, Labor Problems 3 

EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 3 

9 

15 



176 



The General Catalog 



Senior Year Required Courses (Tentative) 



Fall Semester Credits 

IE 301, Engineering Economy 3 

SS 491 or 492, Contemporary Issues 3 

EC 425, Industrial Management 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

IE 420, Manufacturing Controls 3 

Humanities Elective 3 



Free Electives _ ..- 

Technical Electives 

Total credits required: 130 



Electives: (Port of junior and senior years) 

(one of the sequences listed below) 



. 9 credits 
.18 credits 



Physical Metallurgy 
Metallurgy Laboratory 



Metallurgical Operations 
Technical Elective 



Motion and Time Study 
Industrial Safety 



Industrial Metallurgy (Junior Year) 

Fall 

MIM 331, 332 3 

MIM 423 

F~ 

industrial Metallurgy (Senior Year) 

MIM 401. 402 - 4 

3 

7~~ 
Production Control (Junior Year) 



Quality Control 

Industrial Relations 

Plant Layout and Materials Handling 

Technical Electives 



Spring 
3 
1 



TF. %%9, 





4 


IE 310 

(Senior Year) 

IE 443 



3 


2 



FC 4S2 


% 





IE 343 ... 





3 







3 



179 

School 

Of 

Forestry 

RICHARD J. PRESTON, Dean 

While forestry has been recognized and practiced for centuries in Europe, 
this profession is relatively new in the United States, dating from about 
the beginning of the 20th Century, During the period of rapid expansion 
and development of the United States, the forests were badly neglected 
and abused. Now, however, with the timber supplies depleted and the 
value of timber products increasing, sound forest practices have been ac- 
cepted as economically desirable and feasible. Increasing the productivity 
and quality of our forests is basic to the welfare of the Southeast. The im- 
portance of the forest resource in the economy of North Carolina is 
brought out by the fact that 62 per cent of the land area is in forest, with 
wood products industries ranking next to textiles as a source of industrial 
employment. 

Through a program which offers a broad training in the physical and 
biological sciences, as well as a sound cultural background, the School of 
Forestry prepares students for service in the professional fields of forest 
management, pulp and paper technology, and wood technology. 

Curricula 

The school, through its departments of Forest Management and Wood 
Science and Technology, offers undergraduate instruction leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in the professional fields of forest manage- 
ment, wood technology, and pulp and paper technology. All curricula have 
a common freshman year thus enabling the student to postpone selection 
of a major field until he has had an opportunity to become acquainted with 
its scope and possibilities. 

Forest management deals with all phases of the management of wild 
lands and includes such related subjects as water-shed protection, wild- 
life management and recreation. In order that the student may be ade- 
quately prepared for work of such diverse nature, the curriculum provides 
training in such subjects as silviculture, timber estimating, management, 
fire prevention and control, forest pathology, insect control, forest soils, 
economics, and other aspects of land use. 

The course of study in wood technology, which is concerned with the 
technical aspects of utilization, includes training in all types of wood 
using and wood manufacturing industries. It incorporates technical and 
practical principles of logging, milling, seasoning, gluing, preserving, fin- 
ishing, fabricating, and machining, and includes the fundamentals of 
sound business administration. 



180 The General Catalog 

Pulp and paper technology trains men for work in pulp and paper mills. 
Students are given thorough training in chemistry, mathematics, physics, 
wood structure and properties, pulping processes and engineering subjects 
related to pulp and paper manufacturing. 

Degrees 

The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred upon the satisfactory com- 
pletion of any of the four-year curricula in the areas mentioned above. 

Professional preparation beyond the four-year curricula is desirable, and 
qualified students are urged to plan a five-year program leading to the 
master's degree. The degree of Master of Science is offered for those desir- 
ing specialization in the fields of scientific research. For students desiring 
a thorough professional background, the school offers the degree of Master 
of Forestry or Master of Wood Technology. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in several fields of fores- 
try and wood technology. 

Further information regarding graduate study is contained in the Grad- 
uate School Catalog which may be obtained from the dean of the Gradu- 
ate School. 

Facilities and Laboratories 

The School of Forestry is now housed in three modernly equipped 
buildings on the west side of the campus. Faculty offices, classrooms, and 
laboratories are now located in Kilgore Hall, the main forestry building. 
In addition, two buildings house specialized programs which are unique 
in the South. 

Wood Products Laboratory 

The Brandon P. Hodges Wood Products Laboratory is one of the largest 
and best equipped laboratories in existence for the conduct of research 
and training in wood technology. Staff offices, research facilities, wood 
structure, chemistry and physical properties laboratories are located in 
the forestry building. In addition, the Brandon P. Hodges Laboratory 
building houses the wood machining, finishing, gluing and preserving lab- 
oratories, as well as the sawmill, dry kilns, and veneer plant. The labora- 
tory provides service to the wood using industries in the development of 
methods of quality control, production control, operations analysis, and 
market analysis. Graduate students in wood technology participate in the 
laboratory's research program as a part of their advanced training. 

Reuben B. Robertson Laboratory of Pulp and Poper Technology 

The curriculum in pulp and paper technology is approved as the re- 
gional program to serve the Southeast. The Robertson Laboratory pro- 
vides unique and outstanding facilities for instruction and research. Lo- 
cated in the building are wood preparation, chemical, pulping, pulp and 
paper testing, and colorful laboratories, as well as digesters, and a small 



Forestry 181 

paper machine. Space and equipment are adequate to handle 40 seniors 
and 10 graduate students. 

School Forests 

The School of Forestry, with more than 82,000 acres of forest land and 
three permanent field camps, has facilities unexcelled in many respects 
for field instruction and research. 

The Hofmann Forest, owned and operated by the North Carolina For- 
estry Foundation for the benefit of the School of Forestry, consists of ap- 
proximately 78,000 acres located in Jones and Onslow counties in the 
southeastern portion of the State, Pond and loblolly pine together with 
hardwood and cypress swamps characterize this tract. 

The George Watts Hill Demonstration Forest is a tract of 1,500 acres 
located 16 miles north of Durham. This typically Piedmont forest of roll- 
ing terrain contains stands of loblolly, shortleaf, and Virginia pines along 
with numerous hardwoods. The permanent summer camp of sophomores 
is located in this area. This Piedmont area is supplemented by the 1,750 
acre Hope Valley Forest near Chapel Hill. 

The Wayah Recreational Area on the North Carolina National Forest 
near Franklin is located in a typical mountain forest. Facilities at this area 
have been leased from the Government and portions of the spring semes- 
ter of the senior year and of the sophomore summer camp are held in 
permanent quarters of this mountain tract. 

The Carl Alwin Schenck Memorial Forest of 250 acres located four 
miles northwest of the campus is being developed into a model farm forest 
and is used for field instruction near the campus. 

The school nursery is equipped for instructional purposes and the pro- 
duction of planting stock. 

Field Instruction and Experience 

All students are required to present a minimum of one summer of ac- 
ceptable work experience in order to meet the graduation requirements. 
Students are required to consult with their advisers as to what type of 
employment will be acceptable. 

The 10-week sophomore summer camp is a requirement for students in 
forest management. This camp is prerequisite for junior standing. Perma- 
nent, well equipped camps are maintained on these coastal, Piedmont, and 
mountain forests. A "C" average is required for admission to these camps. 

Wood technology students are required to attend a 10-week practicum 
following the sophomore year. This practicum is prerequisite for junior 
standing. The first half of this period is devoted to laboratory exercises 
in machining, gluing, drying and finishing wood; preparation of particle 
board; operation safety and maintenance of equipment; and plant inspec- 
tions. The second half covers experience in logging, milling, cruising, and 
graphic methods. 

Additional field instruction and scheduled trips to representative wood 
industries are required of all students as a part of their class assignments. 



182 The General Catalog 

To cover the costs of chemical supplies and off-campus training all stu- 
dents enrolled in the School of Forestry pay a field laboratory fee of $10 
each year at the time they first register during a school year. A mainte- 
nance and supply fee of $20 is charged for both the summer camp and 
practicum. 

Opportunities 

A wide and rapidly expanding field of employment possibilities is avail- 
able in the Southeast to young men trained in forestry. Until recent years 
most job opportunities were with government agencies in managing public 
forests, and this still constitutes a major source of employment. These 
agencies include State and Federal forest services, extension services, and 
other groups such as the Soil Conservation Service and the Tennessee 
Valley Authority. 

In recent years job opportunities with private industries have expanded 
greatly. Increasing numbers of technically trained young men are enter- 
ing a wide variety of professional positions in the fields of forest land 
management, water-shed management, logging, sawmilling, veneer and 
plywood manufacturing, pulp and paper making, kiln drying, wood 
preservation and the manufacture of wood products such as furniture, di- 
mension stock and various prefabricated items. 

The merchandising of lumber and lumber products offers numerous 
opportunities for students qualified for sales, business administration or 
small building construction. Sawmills and lumber yards, plywood and 
paper manufacturers, and flooring, wallboard, and other forest products 
plants need trained men. 

Exceptional students will find opportunities for employment in research 
or teaching. This type of work ordinarily requires a graduate degree. 
There has been an increasing demand for well-trained woodlands man- 
agers and wood technologists, as well as for research workers in govern- 
ment experiment stations and laboratories. 

More than 80 per cent of the graduates of the School of Forestry are 
now employed in some field of forest or wood products work. The few 
students who have not followed the forestry profession have found their 
college education sufficiently broad to provide a sound basis for a wide 
variety of work. 

Extension Programs 

The Forestry Extension Program of the Agricultural Extension Service 
is a vital part of the school's forestry activities. This program serves the 
landowners and wood industries of the State. It is responsible for their 
understanding, acceptance, and application of new ideas and techniques 
developed through research and experience. The two major fields of pro- 
gram emphasis are forest management, where extension specialists train 
and work through the county agents; and wood products, where the spe- 
cialists work more or less directly with wood industry owners and man- 
agers. 



Forestry 



183 



In cooperation with the College Extension Division, short courses are 
offered in a number of fields to provide men in industry an opportunity 
to keep abreast of modern developments in techniques and equipment. 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Loan Funds 

A number of undergraduate scholarships, research assistantships and 
training fellowships are available to qualified students. Students interested 
in applying should write to the dean of the School of Forestry. 

The Hofmann Loan Fund was established by alumni of the School of 
Forestry to honor Dr. J. V. Hofmann, the first director of the Division, 
Loans to worthy students are available through the Student Loan Fund 
established by the State College Alumni Association. 

Many students help pay their expenses through part-time work at the 
College or in town. The College Counseling Center assists in locating 
employment. 

Honors Program 

Students making exceptional academic records during their freshman 
and sophomore years may, with the approval of the faculty, elect to follow 
an honors program. These students are required to enroll in the core 
courses in the several curricula but are otherwise free to utilize their 
clectives to develop individual courses of study designed to meet their 
needs and satisfy their interests, subject only to the approval of the honors 
adviser. 



Freshman Yeor in All Forestry Curricula 



Fall Semester 

BO 103, General Botany 

••CH 101, General Inorganic 

Chemistry 
or 
••CH 105, General Inorganic 

Chemistry 

EN'G 111, Composition 



Credits 



FOR 101, Introduction to Forestry . 
•••MA 111, Algebra, Trigonometry 
MS 101, Military Science I 
or 

AS 121, Air Science I 

PE 101, Physical Education 

and Hygiene 



18 



Spring Semester 
•BO 214, Dendrology 



•EC 201, General Economics 

and 
•ME 101, Engineering Graphics 
••CH 103, General and Qualiu- 
tive Chemistry 
or 
••CH 107, General and Qualita- 
tive Chemistry 
ENG 112, Composition 



•••MA 112, Analytic Geometry 

and Calculus A 

MS 102, Military Science I 

or 
AS 122, Air Science I 



PE 102, Physical Education 
and Hygiene 



Credits 
4 



_ 3 



17 or 18 



•Forest Management and Wood Technology students take BO 214, Pulp and Paper students take 
ME 101 and EC 201. 
•• Forest Management and Wood Technology students take CH 101 and 103, Pulp and Paper students 

take CH 105 and 107. 
'"Students with odequote backgrounds should take MA 101, 102. 



184 The General Catalog 

Deparfment of Forest Management 

Professor T. E. Maki, Head of the Department 
Professors: 

R. C. Bryant, J. W. Duffield, Arthur Kelman, J. O. Lammi, W. D. Miller, B. J. Zobel 
Associate Professors: 

C. B. Davey, M. H. Farrier. T. O. Perry 
Assistant Professors: 

C. S. Hodges, L. C. Saylor 
Instructors: 

P. J. Dyson, R. L. McElwee 

Forest management is the application of business methods and technical 
forestry principles to the operation of forest properties. This field requires 
a knowledge of individual trees and timber stands, of different forest types 
and entire forest areas, as well as of the basic biological relationships with- 
in the forests. It also requires a knowledge of land surveying, timber 
cruising, measurement of forest products, and of the economic factors 
involved in the business of growing wood crops. 

Curriculum 

The curriculum in forest management is organized to provide a broad 
basic training and also to permit limited specialization. To accomplish the 
latter goal, the curriculum includes 24 elective credits. At the beginning 
of his junior year, the student selects one of the five areas of specialization 
listed and chooses courses listed under this field for his elective credits. 

The curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in forest 
management. A minimum of 152 credits is required for graduation. 

Opportunities 

Students who complete the curriculum are trained for positions with 
pulp companies, lumber companies, and other private landowners; federal 
and state forest services; agricultural extension; and for private enterprise 
as consultants, forest landowners or sawmill operators. 

Forest Management Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 181. 

Sophomore Year 

Pall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EC 201, General Economics 3 CH 220, Organic Chemistry 4 

ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 3 FOR 219, Forest Economy and 

FOR 202, Wood Structure and Its Operation 3 

Properties 3 PY 212, General Physics 4 

MA 211, Analytic Geometry SSC 200, Soils 4 

and Calculus S MS 202. Military Science II 

PY 211, General Physics . 4 or 

MS 201. Military Science II AS 222, Air Science II 1 

or PE 202, Physical Education 1 

AS 221. Air Science II 1 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 17 

18 



Forestry 



185 



Summer Camp 



FOR S204. Silviculture 

FOR S264, Protection 

FOR S274, Mapping and Mensuration 
FOR S284. Uulization 



Credits 



10 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 

FOR 361, Silvics 

ST 311, Statistics 

•ENT 301, Forest Insects 
••English Elective 



•••Option Requirement and 
Electives 



Credits 

3 

3 

5 

3 



or 
or 



Spring Semester 

FOR 362. Silvics 

FOR 372, Mensuration 

•PP 318, Forest Tree Diseases 

••English Elective 

•••Option Requirement 

and Electives 



CrediU 

S 

3 

S 

3 



18 



18 



Fall Semester 

FOR 531, Forest Management 



•Option Requirement 
and Electives 



Senior Yeor 

Credits Spring Semester 



.15 



18 



FOR 511, Silviculture 

FOR 532, Forest Management 

•••Option Requirement 
and Elective 



Credits 

S 

5 



-12 



18 



Forest Management Fields of Specialization 

A student selects one of the following fields of specialization and must 
take those courses listed under that field. 



Forest Management 



BO 421, Plant Physiology 
CE 201, Surveying 



Credits 

4 

3 



FOR 404, Management Analysis 

FOR 405, Forest Inventory 

FOR 512, Forest Economics 
FOR 553, Photogrammetry 



FIR 571, Advanced Mensuration 
ST 312, Statistics 



24 



Either ENT 301 or PP 318 is required of all students. English elective is scheduled for oltemot* 

semester. 

Students not making better than "C" average in ENG 111, 112, or presenting transfer credits for 

ENG 111, 112 will schedule ENG 321, Scientific Writing. 

Electives must include at least 9 credits in humanities or social science. 



186 



The Gener.\l Catalog 



Forest Management Science 



EC 301. Production & Prices 



EC 302. Nat'l Income & Ec. Welfare _ 

EC 401, Prin. Accounting 

FOR 512, Forest Economics 

FOR 572, Forest Policy 

MA 212. Calculus 

MA 215, or 405-Finite Math or 

Matrix Algebra 

ST 312, Statistics 



Forest Mensuration 



BO 421, Plant Physiology „ 
CE 201, Surveying 



CE 510, Advanced Surveying 
FOR 553, Photogrammetry 



FOR 571, Advanced Mensuration _. 

MA 212, Analytics & Calculus 

MA 215, Finite Math 

ST 312, Statistics 



Watershed Management 



AGE 371. Soil and "^Vater Conser- 
vation Engineering 

CE 201. Surveying 



Credits 

3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



24 



Credits 

4 

3 



24 



Credits 



FOR 553. Photogrammetry 2 

MA 212. Calculus 3 

MIG 120, Physical Geology 3 

PY 322, Descriptive Meteorology 2 

PY 333, Applied Meteorology 2 

SSC 511, Soil Physics 4 



23 



Forest Biology 



BO 421. Plant Physiology 
BO 441, Plant Ecology _ 
CE 201, Sur\'eying 



ENT 301 or PP 318. Insects 

or Disease 

MA 212, or MA 215 

ZO 103, Zoology 

ZO 551. Wildlife Science _ 



Credits 

4 

3 

3 



__ 3 
_ 4 
_ 3 



23 



Forestry 1 87 
Forest Recreation and Parks 

Credits 

BO 441, Plant Ecology S 

ENT 301, Insects 

or 

PP 318, Diseases 3 

MIG 120, Physical Geoiogy 3 

PSY 200, Psychology 3 

RS 301, Rural Sociology 3 

SOC 202, Sociology 3 

ZO 103, Zoology 4 

ZO 551, Wildlife Science 3 

25 



Forest Wildlife Management 

Credits 

ZO 103, Zoology (Soph Year) 4 

ZO 206, Vertebrate Zoology 4 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology _. 4 

ZO 520, Fishery Science 3 

ZO 522. Animal Ecology 3 

ZO 551, Wildlife Science 3 

ZO 552. Wildlife Science 3 



24 



Department of Wood Science and Technology 

irofessor E. L. Ellwood, Head of the Department 
Frofessors: 

R. M. Carter, B. A. Jayne, A. J. Stamm 
Associate Professors: 

A. C. Barefoot, C. A. Hart, R. G. Hitchings 
Assistant Professors: 

H. D. Cook, C. G. Landes, R. J. Thomas 
Instructors: 

P. J. DvsoN, R. C. GiLMORE, J. T. Rice 

The wood industries have been a vital part of the economy of North Caro- 
lina for over 300 years. North Carolina ranks first in the nation in the 
manufacture of hardwood, plywood and wooden furniture, first in the 
South in lumber production and among the leaders in the manufacture 
of pulp and paper. The value of forest products produced annually in the 
State exceed $1,125,000,000. Seventeen per cent of the State's labor force 
is employed in the wood industries. 



188 The General Catalog 

The Department of Wood Science and Technology offers two curricula. 
Wood Technology and Pulp and Paper Technology, to train men for 
careers in the wood industries. 



WOOD TECHNOLOGY 

Professor E. L. Ellwood, In Charge 

Curriculum 

The great wood industries which convert wood into thousands of com- 
mercial products offer many opportunities for wood technology majors. 

The curriculum has been designed to give sound coverage in mathema- 
tics and the sciences and to permit sufficient flexibility to enable students 
to specialize along lines of major interest. At the end of the sophomore 
year, wood technology students attend a 10-week practicum which is pre- 
requisite to junior standing. At the beginning of the junior year students 
select an option. 

The option in wood products manufacturing trains men for supervisory 
and production positions in the manufacture of such products as lumber, 
veneer, plywood, particle board, dimension stock, furniture, cabinets, 
millwork, and flooring. 

The wood products economics and management option stresses the fields 
of business administration and economics and trains men for careers in 
merchandising and administration in the wood processing industries, the 
construction industry, or with material suppliers. 

This curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in wood 
technology. A minimum of 151 credits is required for graduation. 

Opportunities 

A career with wood industries offers a variety of opportunities for young 
men trained in wood properties, manufacturing operations and business 
methods. The application of new processes and materials in the conver- 
sion of timber into the thousands of wood products has created a demand 
for technically trained men. Companies manufacturing lumber, veneer 
and plywood, hardwood dimension stock, furniture, millwork, flooring, 
pianos, caskets, wood turnings, adhesives, preservatives, finishing materials, 
and composition boards are types of industries interested in employing 
graduates. 



Forestry 



189 



Wood Technology Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 181. 



Fall Semester 

EC 201, General Economics 

ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 
FOR 202, Wood Structure and 

and Properties I 

•MA 211, Calculus 



•PY 211, General Physics 
MS 201, Military Science 
or 

AS 221, Air Science 



PE 201, Physical Education 



Sophomore Yeor 



Credits 

3 

3 



. 1 
. 1 

18 



Spring Semester 

CH 220, Organic Chemistry 

FOR 203, Wood Structure and 

Properties II 

•MA 212, Calculus 



ME 101, Engineering Graphics 

•PY 212, General Physics 

MS 202, Military Science 

or 
AS 222, Air Science 



PE 202, Physical Education 



CrediU 



. 1 
. 1 

18 



Summer Practicum 



First Session Wood Products 

Practicum (Five Weeks) 
FOR 205-S, Wood Machining 
Practicum 



Credits 



I 



Second Session Wood 



Credits 



FOR 206-S, Wood Drying Practicum _ 1 

FOR 207-S, Gluing Practicum 1 

FOR 208-S, Wood Finishing 

Practicum 1 

FOR 209-S, Plant Inspections 1 



Practicum (Five Weeks) 

FOR 210-S, Mensuration Practicum 2 

FOR 211-S, Logging and Milling 

Practicum 2 

FOR 212-S, Graphic Methods 1 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 

EM 341. Mechanics A (Statics) . 

ENG 321, Scientific Writing 

FOR 301, Wood Processes I 

ST 361, Statistics for Engineers 
Technical Electives 



Fall Semester 

FOR 434, Wood Operations I _ 

FOR 521, Wood Chemistry 

Technical Electives . 

Electives . 



CrediU 

2 

8 

4 

3 

4 



Spring Semester 

FOR 219, Forest Economy and 
Its Operation 



16 



FOR 302, Wood Processes II 

For 444, Intro, to QuaUty Control 

Technical Electives 

Electives 



Senior Ye«r 



Credits 

3 

3 

3 

9 



CrediU 



18 



Spring Semester CrtdiU 

FOR 435, Wood Operations II 3 

FOR 441, Design of Wood Structures _ 5 
FOR 591, Wood Technology Problems _ 8 

Technical Electives 3 

Electives 6 



18 



18 



Students wtio have completed MA 101, 102, should take AAA 201, 202, end PY 201, 202. 



190 The General Catalog 

Fields of Specialization 

At the beginning of the junior year, students with exceptional academic 
records may, with the approval of the faculty, elect the Honors Program. 
Other students will elect one of the following options. When an option 
is chosen the student will select at least two courses from one area of em- 
phasis and at least one course from each of the other two areas of em- 
phasis. The remaining elective hours are to be courses selected by the 
student in consultation with his adviser to best fit his particular interests. 

Wood Products Manufacturing Option 

Credits 
OPERATIONS ANALYSIS EC 450, Economic Decision Processes 3 

EC 552, Econometrics 3 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION EC 310, Economics of the Finn 3 

EC 432, Industrial Relations 3 

STATISTICS ST 515, Experimental Statistics for Engineers 3 

ST 516, Experimental Statistics for Engineers 3 



Wood Products Economics and Management Option 



Credits 



ECONOMICS EC 301, Production and Prices 3 

EC 302, National Income and Economic Welfare 3 

EC 448, International Trade 3 

OPERATIONS ANALYSIS EC 450, Economic Decision Processes . 3 

EC 552, Econometrics 3 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION EC 310. Economics of the Firm 3 



EC 312, Elements of Accounting 3 

EC 425, Industrial Management 3 



PULP AND PAPER TECHNOLOGY 

Professor R. G. Hitchings, In Charge 

Curriculum 

The curriculum in pulp and paper technology trains men for techni- 
cal work in the rapidly growing pulp and paper industry. Graduates are 
prepared for careers as pulp technologists, paper mill chemists, quality 
control specialists, and mill superintendents. After a thorough background 
in basic sciences, the program offers special work in wood pulping pro- 
cesses, chemical and by-products recovery, pulp bleaching, and the various 
papermaking operations such as refining, sizing, filling, coloring, coating, 
and converting. 

The pulp and paper industry ranks fifth among all American industries. 
In 1960 pulp and paper products were valued at 10.7 billions of dollars 
and the industry employed more than 562,000 skilled workers. This is 
primarily a Southern industry with 60 per cent of the nation's pulpwood 
produced in the South. 

Financially supported by 55 major companies, this program was cre- 
ated to meet the critical need for trained men. It is a regional program 



Forestry 



191 



and has been approved by the Southern Regional Education Board as 
the undergraduate program to serve the Southeast in this field. A number 
of scholarships are available. The new Robertson Laboratory of Pulp and 
Paper Technology provides this program with outstanding facilities. 

All students majoring in this curriculum are required to spend at least 
one summer working in a pulp or paper mill where arrangements have 
been made by the College for such employment. Three hours of academic 
credit are granted the student after completion of 12 weeks of mill work 
and presentation of a satisfactory report covering this work experience. In 
addition to this minimum summer work requirement, students are urged 
to work in mills the two remaining summers between academic years be- 
cause of the great value of practical experience in this industry. 

This curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in pulp and 
paper technology. A minimum of 117 credits is required for graduation. A 
fifth year leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in chemical engi- 
neering is available for interested students. 



Pulp and Paper Technology Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 183 



Sophomore Yeor 



Fall Semester 

CH 221, Organic Chemistry 

•MA 211. Calculus B 

•PY 211, General Physics 

MS 201, Military Science 
or 

AS 221, Air Science 

PE 201, Physical Education 

English Elective .— 

Electives 



Credits 

4 

3 

.-_ 4 



Spring Semester 

CH 223, Organic Chemistry 
FOR 342, Fiber Analysis ...... 

•MA 212, Calculus C 

•PY 212, General Physics __ 
MS 202, Military Science 
or 

AS 222, Air Science 

PE 202, Physical Education 



19 



Credits 

4 

3 

3 

4 



- 1 
. 1 

16 



Summer 



FOR 491, Forestry Problems, 
Mill Experience ... 



Credits 
3 



Students who have completed MA 101, 102 should take MA 201, 202 and PY 201, 202. 



192 



The General Catalog 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 

CHE 301, Elements of Chemical 
Engineering 



CH 215, Quantitative Analysis 

FOR 321, Pulp and Paper Technology _ 
ME 304, Fundamentals of Heat Power 

Social Science Elective 

English Elective 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

CHE 302, Elements of Chemical 

Engineering 

CH 231, Physical Chemistry 



FOR 322, Pulp and Paper Technology 

PSY 200. General Psychology 

Social Science Elective 

Elective 



Credits 



19 



19 



Senior Yeor 



Fall Semester Credits 

FOR 411, Pulp and Paper Unit 

Processes S 

FOR 413, Paper Properties and 

Additives 4 

FOR 471, Pulping Process Analysis 4 

FOR 491, Senior Research Problem 1 

FOR 521, Wood Chemistry 3 

Electives 3 



18 



Spring Semester 

FOR 403, Paper Process Analysis 
FOR 412, Pulp and Paper 

Unit Processes 

FOR 461, Paper Converting 

FOR 463, Plant Inspections 

FOR 482, Pulp and Paper Mill 

Management 

FOR 522, Wood Chemistry 

Electives 



Credits 
3 



- 2 
. 3 
.4 

17 





.# 



195 

School 

Of 

Liberal Arts 

FRED V. CAHILL, Dean 

The School of Liberal Arts has a two-fold mission: the training of students 
who wish to concentrate in the areas of the hiunanities and social sciences 
and to participate in the training of students whose primary interests are 
scientific and technological. The first function has been undertaken to satis- 
fy a grooving demand for a college education general in character, yet with 
sufficient depth to provide the foundation for a degree of competence in a 
given discipline. The second, represents the school's contribution to the 
education of all students on the campus and is discharged by offering either 
elective or required courses in the social sciences and humanities which 
are designed to fit the needs of students in the scientific and technological 
cmricula. 

In all instances, the School of Liberal Arts seeks to develop the student's 
communication skills and to acquaint him ^vith our literary heritage; to 
increase his understanding of his economic, political, social and philo- 
sophical environment; to teach him to think critically and scientifically in 
the \vorld of human affairs; and to assist him in developing physical strength 
and stamina as a basis for healthftil living. In addition to the required and 
elective courses offered for all students, courses of study leading to the 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees have l:)een established. 

The School of Liberal Arts includes the departments of Economics, Eng- 
lish, Histoi-y and Political Science, Modern Languages, Philosophy and Re- 
ligion, Physical Education, Social Studies, and Sociology and Anthropology. 
For purposes of the Bachelor of Arts program, the Department of Psychol- 
ogy is associated with the faculty of the school. 

CURRICULA 

The program of studies leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, with 
majors in Economics, English, History, Political Science, Psychology, and 
Sociology is as follows: 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EXG 111, Composition and ENG 112, Composition and Reading 3 

Rhetoric _ 3 Modern Language 3 

•Modern Language _. 3 MA 122, Analytic Geometry and 

MA 111, .Algebra and Trigonometry .. 4 Calculus A _ 4 

•'Social Science _ 3 ••Social Science 3 

(Economics 201, 202; Political Science 201, 202, 301 or 322; Psychology 200, 201; Sociology 202, 
301; Anthropology 252, 305) 



* At the intermediate level 
'* Two of the required four courses must be in departmental sequence. 



196 



The General Catalog 



PE 101, Physical Education 
MS 101, Military Science I 

or 
AS 121. Air Science I ._ 



. 1 
15 



PE 102, Physical Education 1 

MS 102, Military Science I 

or 
AS 122, Air Science I 1 



15 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 



Spring Semester Credits 
Literature 3 



Credits 

Literature 3 

(English 261, 262; 265. 266, English 468 may be substituted for English 265; Modern Language 

301. 302) 

••Social Science 3 »*Social Science 3 

Natural Science _ 3 or 4 Natural Science 3 or 4 

(Biological Science 100 Botany 103; Zoology 103; Physics 211, 212; 221; Chemistry 101, 103; 
Geology, MIG 101, 120, 220, 222) 

PHI 205, Problems and types Elective 3 

of Philosophy 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 PE 202, Physical Education I 

MS 201, Military Science II MS 202, Military Science II 

or or 

AS 221, Air Science II 1 AS 222, Air Science II — 1 



17 or 18 



17 or 18 



Junior and Senior Years 

Aside from one semester of the History of Science or Philosophy of Sci- 
ence (Philosophy 405 or History 422), the work of the last two years is 
divided between the major of approximately 30 credits selected with as- 
sistance of departmental adviser and electives selected w^ith the assistance of 
the adviser. The total graduation requirement is 128 credits. 

The curriculum leading to the degxee of Bachelor of Science follows a 
somewhat different plan. The student divides his time approximately 
equally between a concentration in Economics, English, History, Political 
Science, Sociology and scientific or technological courses. It will be to the 
advantage of the student entering this program to present at least four years 
of high school mathematics so that he may omit Mathematics III. 

The curricular outline of the Bachelor of Science program follows: 

Freshman Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

ENG 111, Composition and Rhetoric 3 

•Modern Language 3 

CH 101, General Chemistry I 4 

MA 111, Algebra and Trigonometry .. 4 

PE 101, Physical Education 1 

MS 101, Military Science I 

or 
AS 121, Air Science I 



16 



.Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 112, Composition and Reading .. 3 

Modern Language 3 

CH 103, General Chemistry II 4 

MA 102, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus I .— - 4 

PHI 203, Introduction to Philosophy 2 

PE 102, Physical Education 1 

MS 102, Military Science I 

or 
AS 122, Air Science I 1 



U 



* At the intermediate level 
** Two of the required four courses must be in departmental sequence. 



Liberal Arts 197 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 205, Reading for Discovery ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 

or or 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

MA 201, Analytic Geometry and MA 202, Analytic Geometry and 

and Calculus II 4 Calculus III 4 

History History 

or or 

Social Science 3 Social Science 3 

PY 205, General Physics 5 PY 208, General Physics 5 

PE 201, Physical Education ., 1 PE 202, Physical Education 1 

MS 201, Military Science II MS 202, Military Science II 

or or 

AS 221, Air Science II 1 AS 222, Air Science II 1 

17 17 

In the junior and senior years, the student Avill complete a sequence of 
eight courses and seminars selected with assistance of the departmental 
adviser in the field of concentration and at the same time will complete at 
least four courses in a prescribed sequence mathematics, basic science or 
a technology. Electives, either limited or completely free, round out the 
progiam. 



Department of Economics 



Professor Ernst W. Swanson, Head of the Department 

Professors: 

E. A. Fails, B. M. Olsen, T. W. Wood 

Associate Professors: 

A. J. Bartley, L. a. Dow, Cleon Harrell 
Assistant Professors: 

Gerald Garb, ^V. R. Hendley, T. H. Park, C. S. Shen, O. G. Thompson 

Instructors: 

M. M. El-Kammash, M. a. Hunt, W. J. Stober 

Adjunct Professor: 
D. R. Dkon 

The Department of Economics seeks to help students understand the 
economic process, the nature and functioning of the economy and useful 
approaches to and methods of economic analysis. In pursuance of this end 
the department has a representative offering of courses in the major fields 
of economic theory, applied economics and business operation at both un- 
dergraduate and graduate levels. Several courses have been designed pri- 
marily for students working toward advanced degrees in the technical 
schools. Members of the department are engaged in extension work and 
economic research. 



i'i8 The General Catalog 

Department of English 

Professor L. C. Hartley, Head of the Department 
Professors: 

A. M. Fountain, H. G. Kincheloe, R. P. Marshall, Jack Suberman, R. G. Walser 
Associate Professors: 

P. H. Davis, H. G. Eldridge, F. H. Moore, Guy Owen, E. H. Paget, D. J. Rules, A. B. R. 

Shelley L. H. Swain, L. R. Whichard, R. B. Wynne 
Assistant Professors: 

Larry Champion, Max Halperen, Sadie J. Harmon, A. S. Knowles, B. G. Koonce, Jack 

Porter, Norwood Smith, Porter Williams, Jr. 
Instructors: 

D. P. Allen, P. E. Blank, J. G. Easley, Hazel Griffin, Harry Hargrave, Eugene Hol- 

LAHAN, W^ W. Martin, Nancy G. Morgan, Howard Pearce, R. B. White 
Special Lecturer: 

Mary C. Williams 

The English Department offers both basic and advanced courses in three 
areas: composition, speech, and literature. The freshman course, which is 
common to all curricula and prerequisite to all advanced courses in Eng- 
lish, is designed to give intensive training and practice in written communi- 
cation, plus an introduction to literary types. Courses in business, scientific, 
and creati\e ^vriting and in speech are offered both to meet course require- 
ments in special curricula and to provide electives for interested students. 
Advanced courses are available for a major in literature in the Bachelor 
of Arts program, as well as for areas of concentration in literature and in 
communications in the Bachelor of Science program. 



Deparf-ment of History and Political Science 

Professor P. W. Edsall, Head of the Department 
Professors: 

M. L. Brown, F. V. Cahill, Jr., J. T. Caldwell, A. Holtzman, Stuart Noblin, L. W. 

Seegers 
Associate Professors: 

L. W. Barnhardt, B. F. Beers, W. J. Block, J. L. Helguera 
Assistant Professors: 

M. S. Downs, C. F. Kolb, O. H. Orr, Jr. 
Instructors: 

J. C. Farrell, Stanley Suval 

An understanding of the historical background of our times and of political 
principles, political behavior and governmental systems is expected of the 
educated man. To enable students to acquire this understanding the De- 
partment of History and Political Science offers work in the principal fields 
of history and political science. Students may major or concentrate in either 
discipline. Minor programs are also available to graduate students. .An 
important aspect of the department's work involves service courses in the 
curricula of the other schools. Students generally are in\ited to elect courses 
in either or both disciplines. 



Liberal Arts 199 

Department of Modern Languages 

Professor G. W. Poland, Head of the Department 
Associate Professors: 

F. J. Allred, S. T. Ballencer 
Assistant Professors: 

Ruth B. Hall, H. L. Titus 
Instructors: 

B. S. Howard, S. E. Simonsen 

The Department of Modern Languages provides instruction in French, 
German, Spanish, Italian, and Russian as well as special instruction in 
English for foreign students. It also offers courses in the literature and 
culture of these language areas. 

The department cooperates with graduate and research programs by 
offering special courses for graduate students in connection with language 
requirements for advanced degrees and by providing translation service. 
Graduate students enrolled in technical and scientific courses translate 
projects in their field of major interest. Upon satisfactory completion of 
these projects, they are accepted as evidence of reading ability in the 
particular language. 



Department of Philosophy and Religion 

Professor W. N. Hicks, Head of the Department 
Associate Professors: 

Paul A. Bredenberc, W. Lawrence Highfii l, J. Leonard Middleton 
Assistant Professor: 

•W. Curtis Fitzgerald, Jr. 
Instructor: 

William Kurvlo 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion provides basic courses in 
philosophy and religion for students in the several schools of the College. 
The courses include offerings in the areas of logic, history of philosophy, 
philosophy of science, philosophy of art, philosophy of religion, ethics, the 
Bible and its backgroiuid, religious movements in the United States, and 
world religions. 

Effort is made to relate and make effective application of theoretical 
kno^vled2:e and understanding. 



Department of Physical Education 

Professor P. H. Derr, Head of liie Department 
Professor: 

W. E. Smith 
Professor Emeritus: 

John F. Miller 

* On leave. 



200 The General Catalog 

Associate Professors: 

J. B. Edwards, Harold Keating, J. F. Kenfield, Jr. 
Assistant Professors: 

J. L. Clements, N. E. Cooper, Arthur M. Hoch, W. R. Leonhardt, J. H. Little, F. J 

Murray, W. H. Sonner 
Instructors: 

H. O. Floyd, Jr., M. S. Rhodes, W. M. Shea 

The Department of Physical Education contributes to the general welfare 
of the student by providing programs and conditions in which he may de- 
velop and maintain physical strength and stamina, relax tensions, acquire 
an appreciation for the importance of healthful living and develop knowl- 
edge and skills for recreation. The programs also provide situations in which 
the student may develop qualities of cooperation, leadership, and social 
poise. 

In addition to instruction and supervision for the participant in physical 
education in regular classes; there are opportunities for all students to par- 
ticipate in fjeneficial forms of physical exercise through the program in 
intramural athletics. 



Deparf-menf- of Psychology 

(See Education) 



Department of Social Studies 

Professor G. A. Gullette, Head of the Department 
Professors: 

C. I. Foster, J. R. Lambert 
Associate Professors: 

R. N. Elliott, R. S. Metzger 
Assistant Professors: 

W. F. Edwards, A. K. Lowenstein 
Instructors: 

R. V. Brickell, R. M. Cornish, R. J. Clack 

The Department of Social Studies draws its staff from the various fields 
of the humanities and the social sciences. It contributes to the training 
of men whose professional competence is devoted to the public interest by 
offering courses especially designed to emphasize the close interconnections 
that bind liberal studies to the world of science and technology. 



Department of Sociology and Anthropology 

Professor Sanford Winston, Head of the Department 
A 1 ^nciate Professors: 

E. H. Johnson, H. D. Rawls 
Assistant Professors: 

Herbert Collins, J. G. Hardee, J. W. Tomlin 

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology has three major functions 
in relation to the training and developing of students: (I) to make available 



Liberal Arts 201 

an undergraduate curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree; (2) to 
provide training in human group behavior for students majoring in other 
areas; and (3) in cooperation with the Rural Sociology Department pro- 
viding a graduate program at both the master's and doctorate levels. 

The general aim of the department is to provide a sound and highly de- 
veloped undergraduate major which will lead to a rewarding and satisfying 
professional career; to provide other students with an opportunity to under- 
stand more fully the social world in which they live in relation to their own 
interests; and to provide an opportunity for exceptional students to pursue 
a graduate program in sociology. 



•■r^>5p???^i! 




203 

School 

Of 

Physical Sciences and Applied Mathemaf-ics 



ARTHUR CLAYTON MENIUS, JR., Dean 
CAREY G. MUMFORD, Assistant to the Dean 

Current events and the outlook tor the future continue to emphasize the 
need for an increasing supply of high caliber scientists, mathematicians, 
and engineers. The School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics 
is dedicated to helping to supply this need. In addition to the Depart- 
ments of Chemistry, Experimental Statistics, Mathematics, and Physics, 
the operations of Physical Sciences Research, the Computing Center, and 
the Reactor Project were added to the school in 1961. The growth of the 
school since its formation in 1960 has reaffirmed the fact that strong edu- 
cational and research opportunities in the basic sciences and mathematics 
are fundamentally necessary, and are important adjimcts to successful 
programs in the applied fields. 

The mission of the School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathema- 
tics at North Carolina State College is three-fold: the training of well 
qualified scientists and mathematicians; the technical support of curricula 
in agriculture, design, education, engineering, forestry, and textiles; and 
research in science and mathematics. 

Facilities 

The School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics is fully 
equipped for instruction and research. Special equipment and laboratories 
associated with the departments of the school are a complete radio-chemis- 
try laboratory; a low power homogeneous reactor and a heterogeneous 
reactor designed for 100 kw; a one million volt Van de Graaff accelerator; 
two analog computers, GEDA and Donner; and an IBM 1410 digital com- 
puter supplemented by access to the Univac 1105 at the University of 
North Carolina Computation Center at Chapel Hill. Other facilities on 
the campus available for teaching and research include an RCA electron 
microscope, complete X-ray laboratories with diffraction and radiographic 
equipment, and precision instrument shops. 

Curriculo 

It is intended that the undergraduate degree for the school be Bachelor 
of Science with a major in chemistry, physics, applied mathematics or 
experimental statistics. The curricula of the Departments of Chemistry, 
Mathematics, Physics, and Statistics are so arranged as to have essentially a 
common freshman year. Because of this, a student entering any one of 
these curricula can, without penalty, change to another department in the 



201 The General Catalog 

School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics during his fresh- 
man year. This common year is outlined below. 

Freshman Year in All Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics Curricula 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry.- 4 CH 103, General and Qualitative 

or Chemistry 4 

CH 105, General Inorganic Chemistry.... 4 or 

and CH 107, Genera! and Qualitative 

CH 1U6, General Inorganic Chemistry Chemistry 4 

Laboratory 1 and 

ENG 111, English Composition 3 CH 108, General and Qualitative 

MA 102, Analytic Geometry and Chemistry Laboratory I 

Calculus I _.... 4 ENG 112, English Composition 3 

PE 101, Physical Education 1 MA 201, Analytic Geometry and 

MS 101, Military Science I Calculus II 4 

or PE 102, Physical Education 1 

AS 121, Air Science I I MS 102, Military Science I 

Humanities 3 or 

or AS 122, Air Science I 1 

Natural Science 4 PY 205, General Physics I ._ 4 

PSM 100, Orientation or 



Natural Science 4 



16 or 17 



17 or 18 



The total number of hours required for graduation is to be a minimum of 135 hours which includes 8 
hours -of military science and physical education. Twenty-fine semester hours are to be required in 
the humanities, exclusive of Freshman English. An additional requirement is one modern language. 

Graduate Study 

The Master of Science degree is offered by each department of the 
school with the doctorate available in mathematics, physics and statistics. 
The graduate programs are described in detail in the Graduate School 
Catalog. 

Department of Chemistry 

Professor Ralph Clay Swann, Head of the Department 

Professors: 

Thomas Glenn Bowery, George Osmore Doak, Richard Henry Loeppert, Walter John 
Peterson, Willis Alton Reid, Cowin Cook Robinson, Paul Porter Sutton, Samuel B. 
TovE, Joseph Arthur Weybrew 

Associate Professors: 

David Marshall Gates, Alonzo Freeman Coots, Leon David Freedman, Forrest Wil- 
liam Getzen, Louis Allman Jones, Richard Coleman Pinkerton, Raymond Cyrus White 

Assistant Professors: 

Frank Bradley Armstrong, Thomas Jacks Blalock, Lawrence Hoffman Bowen, Wil- 
liam Prentiss Ingram, Jr., George Gilbert Long, Edward Carroll Sisler 

Instructors: 

William Rodger Johnston, Elizabeth Hines Manning, John \V^fsley Morgan, George 
Motley Oliver, Mrs. Grave Johnson Shaw, Thomas Marsh AVard 

The principal objective of the Department of Chemistry is to provide 
sound basic training in chemistry and the related sciences. Emphasis is 
placed on aiding and encouraging creative thinking. 



Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics 



205 



Curriculum 

The curriculum for the Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry is de- 
signed to give the students fundamental training in mathematics and the 
biological and physical sciences with maximum instruction in chemistry. 
Graduates in chemistry are provided with a sound foundation for future 
graduate study. 

The curriculum meets the requirements of the American Chemical So- 
ciety for the training of professional chemists. 

^Chemistry Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 204. 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



CH 221, Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 222, Organic Chemistry Lab. 1 

MA 202, Analytic Geometry 

and Calculus III 4 

PY 206. General Physics _ _. 4 

English . 3 

MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 221. Air Science II .._ 1 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 



18 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 223, Organic Chemistry II 4 

CH 224, Organic Chemistry Lab. 1 

MA 301, Differential Equations 3 

PY 207, General Physics 4 

English 3 

MS 202, Military Science II 
or 

AS 222, Air Science II 1 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 



17 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 431, Physical Chemistry I 3 

CH 432, Physical Chemistry Lab ._ 1 

ML 103, Elementary German _ 3 

Minor 3 

Humanities 3 

Free Electives _ 3 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 433. Physical Chemistry II 3 

CH 434, Physical Chemistry Lab. 1 

CH 411, Analytical Chemistry I 4 

ML 104, German Grammar and 

Prose Reading 3 

Minor . _ 3 

Humanities 3 



17 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester 

CH 413, Analytical Chemistry II 4 CH 501, Inorganic Chemistry 1 

Major _ 3 Minor 

Minor _ 3 Humanities 

Humanities 3 Free Electives 

Free Electives .. 3 

16 



Credits 

-. 3 

3 

_.. 3 

7 



16 



•Chemistry mojors are required to take CH 105, CH 106, CH 107, and CH 108. The Chemistry Depart- 
ment will recognize as a minor four semester courses in the biological sciences, engineering, mathe- 
matics, or physics. Any combination of four courses from two of these areas will constitute a "split" 
minor. The courses applied to a minor should exhibit the application of chemistry in the areas chosen 
This sequence is to be chosen in consultation with the faculty adviser prior to the third year of study. 



20fi The Geneh^al Catalog 

Department of Experimental Statistics 

Professor J. A. Ricney, Head of the Department 
Professors: 

R. L. Anderson, Graduate Administrator, C. C. Cockerham, A. H. E. Grandage, R. J. 

Hader, H. L. Llcas, F. E. McVay, D. D. Mason, R. J. Monroe, D. R. Shreve, R. W. Stacy, 

R. G. D. Steel 
yisiting Professor: 

D. W. Havne 
Adjunct Professors: 

W. S. Connor, A. L. Finkner 
Professor Emeritus: 

Gertrude M. Cox 
Associate Professors: 

W. J. Hall, R. G. Peterson, C. H. Proctor, VV. VV. G. Smart, T. D. Wallace 
Visiting Associate Professors: 

J. C. Koop, H. R. van der Vaart 
Adjunct Associate Professor: 

S. Addelman 
Assistant Professors: 

J. O. Rawlings, F. J. Verlinden 
Assistant Statisticians: 

M. A. CiPOLLONi, J H. Meade, W. S. Overton, C. A. Rohde, B. J. Stines, E. H. Yen 

Statistics is a relatively new and rapidly expanding science. It is the 
body of scientific methodology which deals with efficient collection and 
presentation of data and with the general problem of drawing valid and 
reliable inferences from data. Early development of statistics occurred in 
the biological and social sciences. In recent years the use of statistical con- 
cepts and methodology has spread into virtually all areas of scientific en- 
deavor, especially the physical sciences and engineering. 

The Department of Experimental Statistics is part of the Institute of 
Statistics which also includes a Department of Biostatistics and a Depart- 
ment of Statistics at Chapel Hill. The Department of Experimental Sta- 
tistics provides instruction, consultation and computational services on 
research projects, for other departments of all schools at North Carolina 
State College including the Agricultural Experiment Station. Governmen 
tal agencies and other institutions use the facilities of the department. 
The range and quality of the data handled furnish an excellent back- 
ground for training students in the use of statistical procedures in such 
fields as the physical, biological and social sciences and in industrial de- 
velopment and engineering. 

Opportunities 

Most fields of research, development, production, and distribution are 
seeking persons trained in statistical methods and theory. Research groups 
are fast realizing the importance of statistics in planning experiments and 
in analyzing and computing results. Industry is placing increasing reliance 
on statistical methods to control the quality of goods in the process of 
manufacture and to determine the acceptability of goods already produced. 
Statistical prrxredures based on scientific sampling are becoming basic 



Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics 



207 



tools for making weather forecasts, crop and livestock estimates, business 
trend predictions, opinion polls and the like. 

A graduate in statistics will find abundant opportunities in any of the 
areas listed above— both in industry and with federal and state agencies. 

Experimental Statistics Curriculum 

For the fieshnian year see page 204. 

Assuming BO 103 and PY 205 were elected during the freshman year, a typical program for 
the succeeding three jears might be as follows: 



Fall Semester 

MA 202, Calculus II - - 

PY 206, General Physics II 

EC 201, Economics _. 

Foreign Language . 
MS 201, Military Science ..... 
PE 201, Physical Education 



Sophomore Year 



Credits 

4 

4 

3 

3 

1 

._ 1 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

MA 301, Differential Equations 3 

PY 207, General Physics III 4 

EC 202, Economics _ 3 

ZO 103. General Zoology 4 

Foreign Language 3 

MS 202, Military Science _ 1 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 



19 



Fall Semester 

ST 361, Introduction to Statistics 

PSY 200, Introduction to Psychology 
ENG 321, Scientific Writing 

Minor 

Humanities 



Junior Year 

Credits Spring Semester 



15 



Credits 



ST 362, Introduction to Statistics 3 

ST 302, IBM Laboratory 2 



Minor 

Humanities „ 
Free Electives 



17 



Fall Semester 

ST 421, Basic Statistical Theory _. 

ST 515, Experimental Statistics 

for Engineers 

Minor 

Humanities 

Free Electives 

Major Electives 



Senior Year 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 
3 ST 422, Basic Statistical Theory 3 



18 



ST 516, Experimental Statistics 

for Engineers 3 

Minor 3 

Humanities _ 3 

Free Electives 4 



16 



Graduate Study 

The Department of Experimental Statistics offers work leading to the 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Minor work may be 
taken in any of the wide variety of research programs on the campus. In 
addition, a cooperative arrangement with the Departments of Biostatis- 
tics and Statistics at Chapel Hill provides for minor work in health affairs 
and in statistical theory. Active participation in the graduate faculty by 
several of the staflE at the Research Triangle Institute provides further 



208 The General Catalog 

strength of staff and a ^vider variety of research experience available to 
graduate students. 

The department has at least one staff member who consults with re- 
searchers in each of the following fields and who conducts his own re- 
search on statistical problems which are encountered: the various agricul- 
tural sciences, quantitative genetics, industry and engineering, physical 
sciences and social sciences. In addition there is active research in the gen- 
eral fields of experimental design and sample surveys. 



Department of Mathematics 

Professor John W. Cell, Head of the Department 
Professors: 

R. C. Bullock, J. M. Clarkson, W. J. Harrington, M. Itoh, Jack Levine, C. G. Mumford, 

H. M. Nahikian, Graduate Administrator, H. V. PARii, Administrative Assistant, D. R. 

5hreve, R. a. Struble, J. H. Wahab, H. P. Williams, L. S. Winton 
Associate Professors: 

H. C. Cooke, A. R. Nolstad, D. M. Peterson, H. A. Petrea, H. E. Speece, H. van der 

Vaart, G. C. W^atson 
Adjunct Associate Professor: 

Robert T. Herbst 
Assistant Professors: 

V. R. Brantley, E. J. Canaday, D. L. George, D. J. Hansen, C. F. Lewis, C. H. Little, 

Jr., Morton Lowengrub, R. A. MacKerracher, Armstrong Maltbie, L. B. Martin, Jr., 

Peter Shahdan, J. B. Wilson 
Instructors: 

C. N. Anderson, Dorothy L. Brant, Joyce Caraway, Martha J. Garren, Ruth B. Hon- 

EYCUTT, Julie G. McVay, D. E. Nixon, Carlotta P. Patton, J. L. Sox, G. S. Speidel. Jr. 

There is great need in industry and in the field of teaching for people 
trained in applied mathematics. The increasing use of both digital and 
analog computers and the shift to automation in industry have given rise 
to requirements for mathematics analysts. The Department of Mathema- 
tics offers opportunities in the elementary and advanced courses for the 
student to learn important concepts in mathematics and to apply these to 
situations in mathematically oriented areas. 



Curriculum 

The curriculum for the Bachelor of Science degree in applied mathe- 
matics is designed to provide the student with a sound foundation in 
mathematics and at the same time to give him a reasonable acquaintance 
with some other area of science or engineering in which mathematics is 
applied. Required courses are relatively few in number so that the indi- 
vidual needs of the student are met more readily. The individual curric- 
ulum can be designed either to fit the needs of a student for a position 
in industry or to provide him with a strong foundation for future gradu- 
ate work. 



Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics 



209 



Mofhematics Curriculum 

For the freshman year see page 204. 



Fall Semester 

MA 202, Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry III — 

PY 206, General Physics II . 

English Literature 

•Modern Language — 
MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 221, Air Science II ._ _ 

PE 201, Physical Education .... 
Humanity Elective — . 



Sophomore Year 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 301, Differential Equations 3 

4 PY 207. General Physics III 4 

4 ••Humanity Elective 3 

3 •Modern Language 3 

3 MS 202, Military Science II 

or 

AS 222, Air Science II 1 

1 PE 202, Physical Education I 

1 Free Elective 3 

3 

18 



19 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 403, Fundamental of Algebra 3 MA 405, Introduction to Determi- 

MA 441, Advanced Calculus I 3 nants and Matrices ..-- — 3 

Statistics 3 MA 512, Advanced Calculus II 3 

••••Minor _. 3 Statistics 3 

••Humanity Elective 3 ••••Minor — 3 

Free Elective 3 Humanity Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

18 

18 



Fall Semester 

•••Major 

••••Minor 

••Humanity Elective 
Free Elective 



Senior Year 



Credits 

6 

3 



3 

3 



15 



Spring Semester 

• • * Major 

••••Minor 

••Humanity Elective 

Free Elective 



Credits 

6 

3 

3 

2 



14 



Graduate Study 

The faculty of the Department of Mathematics feels that a student en- 
tering the Graduate School to work toward the degree of Master of Science 
in applied mathematics should be well grounded in mathematics through 
two semesters of advanced calculus and two of modern algebra (or the 
equivalent). In addition, he should have a strong background in mechan- 
ics, physics, or in some other mathematically oriented area. 

Minimum course requirements for the degree of Master of Science in 
applied mathematics are 30 hours of which six to nine hours must be 
selected from a minor field which is usually some branch of engineering, 

• The particular language chosen (French, German, or Russian) is subject to the approval of the 

•• These "junior-senior humanities generally should be chosen from humanities offerings at the 300 
level and above, or from modern language offerings beyond the required courses. 
••* To be chosen from mathematics offerings at the 400-500 level. 
•**♦ The minor field is, as a minimum, a four-course sequence from one other area, and these courses 
normally should exhibit the application of mathematics in this area. They are not to include any 
course from this area that is otherwise applied in satisfying the requirements of this curriculum. 
This minor is to be chosen in consultotion with the student's adviser prior to or during the junior 
year and this choice Is subject to the approval of the department head. 



210 The General Catalog 

physics, or statistics. In addition to the above requirements, the student 
must write a thesis and show a satisfactory reading knowledge of a for- 
eign language. 

For more detailed information and for requirements for the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree see the Graduate School Catalog. 

Deparfment of Physics 

•Burlington Professor Raymond L. Murray, Head of the Department 
Burlington Professor: 

WiLLARD H. Bennett 
Professors: 

\V. O. DoGCETT, Harry C. Kelly, Forrest W. Lancaster, J. S. Meares, A. C. Menius, Jr., 

R. H. Snyder, Newton Underwood, A. W. Waltner 
Associate Professors: 

••J. T. Lynn, Graduate Administrator^ R. F. Stainback, E. Jack Story 
Assistant Professors: 

E. J. Brown, William P. Bucher, Grover C. Cobb, Jr., R. L. Dough, William R. Davis, 

Raoul M. Freyre, D. H. Martin, M. R. Moss, J. Y. Park 
Instructors: 

Hubert L. Owen, J. T. Spence 

Physics is a fundamental science of observations, measurements and mathe- 
matical description of the particles and processes of nature. Included is 
the study of classical physics— mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, magne- 
tism and optics— plus modern physics embracing atomic, ionic, and nuclear 
particles and phenomena. In addition to extending our basic knowledge 
of the universe, the science of physics provides an attack on problems of 
importance in modern technology. The variety of the contributions made 
by physicists is indicated by these typical activities— discovery and meas- 
urements on new particles of nature; the invention and use of new in- 
struments to probe interplanetary space; the prediction of behavior of 
nuclear chain reactors; the study of processes fundamental to the release 
of thermonuclear energy; and research on missiles, satellites and space 
craft. 

Programs 

The Physics Department provides courses in fundamental physics and 
in several specializations relating to nuclear reactions, reactor analysis, 
radioactivity, radiological health and safety, electrical discharges in gases, 
and space phenomena. 

Opportunities 

The demand for graduates with fundamental and specialized knowledge 
in physics has grown rapidly in recent years. The demands for scientists 
are currently greatest in the nuclear energy and missile and space fields, 
in which large research and development programs are in progress. Posi- 
tions are available to qualified individuals in government laboratories, 
industrial research facilities and in universities. 

* On leave 
•* Acting head 



Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics 211 



Physics Curriculum 



Typical curricula emphasizing fundamental physics and nuclear science 
are shown below. 

For the freshman year see page 204. 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 

PY 206, General Physics 

MA 202, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus III - 

Foreign Language -. 

Humanities Elective 

PE 201, Physical Education 

MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 201, Air Science II -- 



Credits 
4 



16 



Spring Semester 

PY 207, General Physics 

MA 301, Differential Equations 

English Elective 

Foreign Language 

Humanities Elective ... 

PE 202, Physical Education 

MS 201. Military Science II 

or 
AS 201, Air Science II 



Credits 
4 



1 

18 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

PY 401, Mechanics 
or 

PY 403, Electricity and Magnetism 4 

PY 407, Modern Physics 3 

MA 441, Advanced Calculus I 3 

SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 3 

Minor 3 

Free Elective ._ 3 



19 



Spring Semester Credits 

PY 402, Heat and Sound 
or 

PY 404, Optics 4 

PY 410, Nuclear Physics I 4 

Mathematics 3 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 3 

Minor . 3 



17 



Senior Year 



(Fundamental Physics Emphasis) 



Fall Semester Credits 

PY 401, Mechanics 
or 

PY 403, Electricity and Magnetism 4 

Mathematics _ _. 3 

SS 491, Contemporary Issues 3 

Minor 3 

Free Electives 6 



Spring Semester 

PY 402, Heat and Sound 
or 

PY 404, Optics _ — 

Mathematics — 

PHI 405, Foundations of Science 

Minor _ 

Free Elective 



Credits 



19 



16 



212 The General Catalog 

Senior Year 
(Nuclear Science Emphasis) 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

PY 510, Nuclear Physics II 4 PY 520, Physical Measurements 

PY 518, Radiation Hazards in Radioactivity 3 

and Protection 3 PY 530, Introduction to Nuclear 

Mathematics .- 3 Reactor Theory 3 

SS 491, Contemporary Issues _. 3 PY 531, Nuclear Reactor Laboratory — 1 

Free Electives 6 Mathematics 3 

PHI 405, Foundations of Science 3 



19 Free Elective 3 

16 



Graduate Study 

The Department of Physics provides programs of advanced study in 
applied physics leading to the master's and doctor's degrees. A research 
thesis is required for each degree. A comprehensive understanding of 
classical and modern physics is stressed, with study in either nuclear sci- 
ence or fundamental physics, nuclear reactor theory, radiological health 
and safety, plasma physics, space physics, and the theory of fields. Work in 
the student's minor field will generally be taken in other departments of 
the School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics. Research facili- 
ties available include a lO-kilowatt heterogeneous reactor, a 100-watt 
water boiler reactor, a natural uranium sub-critical assembly, a one-Mev 
Van de Graaff accelerator, and high speed computing equipment. Plasma 
laboratories with precision equipment are available. Experimental re- 
search is in progress on neutron diffusion by pulsed methods, high current 
particle streams, and simulation of space conditions. Research and teach- 
ing assistanships are available to qualified graduate students. 



Computing Center 

Professor D. R. Shreve, Director 

An IBM 1410 digital computer is located in the Computing Center in 
Patterson Hall. The computer, a card-type system with 40,000 characters 
of core storage, is used for faculty and student research, and for instruction 
in scheduled credit courses and non-credit short courses. 

Credit courses in computing are supplemented by instruction in com- 
puter programming included in courses offered by several departments in 
the College, by a continuous offering of non-credit short courses, and by 
use of IBM 1620 computers, and a variety of analog computers in several 
other departments. 



Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics 213 

Physical Sciences Research 

E. J. Story, Head 
Research Engineer: 

M. A. KooNTZ 
Research Associate: 

B. E. Leonard 

The Burlington Nuclear Laboratories building, which houses a 100 kilo- 
watt heterogeneous research reactor, plus 32 rooms including research 
laboratories, offices and shops, is the school's major facility for research 
in nuclear physics, radiation, and nuclear sciences. The facilities also in- 
clude a iOO watt homogeneous reactor, a natural uranium subcritical 
assembly, and a considerable investment in research equipment, princi- 
pally nuclear electronics. 

Other major facilities in the School of Physical Sciences and Applied 
Mathematics include plasma physics laboratories, a 1 Mev Van de Graaff 
accelerator, chemistry and radioisotope laboratories, a spectroscopy labora- 
tory and analog computers. 

In addition to contracted research for industrial firms, support is re- 
ceived from federal agencies. 




*• 






215 

School 

Of 

Textiles 



MALCOLM E. CAMPBELL, Dean 

JAMES W. KLIBBE, Academic Coordinotor 

The manufacture of textiles has become one of the world's leading indus- 
tries. North Carolina's textile industry now ranks first in the nation 
in terms of employment and value of manufactured products. Further 
more, the textile industry of the State and the area is broadly diversified, 
ranging from the production of man-made fibers to finished garments, 
from cotton spinning mills to finishing plants, from woven goods to all 
types of knitted materials, and from suppliers to machine manufacturers. 

Because of the tremendous expansion in the scope of textiles it has 
become necessary to utilize the talents of the chemist, the physicist, the 
engineer, the businessman, as well as the traditional spinner, weaver, and 
dyer. 

The School of Textiles offers several programs at both the undergrad- 
uate and graduate levels in the applied sciences underlying the produc- 
tion and finishing of textile products. Textile research supplements and 
supports graduate study. 

The purpose of the school is fourfold: to educate men and women for 
professional service in all phases of the textile industry; to develop their 
capacities for intelligent leadership; to aid in the economic development 
of the textile industry; and to cooperate with the textile industry in im- 
proving through scientific research, manufacturing efficiency and the 
quality and value of manufactured products. 

In the educational program, for administration, the School of Textiles 
is organized into three departments: Textile Technology, Knitting Tech- 
nology, and Textile Chemistry. 

Curricula 

The School of Textiles offers two basic four-year curricula, textile tech- 
nology and textile chemistry. After the freshman year these two programs 
differ; however, there is sufficient similarity in the first year to permit the 
student to defer the final decision as to his major field of study until the 
end of the freshman year. 

A program is offered by the school to permit the student with a B.S., A.B., 
or B.A. degree from an accredited college or university to complete the re- 
quirements for a Bachelor of Science degree in textile technology after the 
satisfactory completion of one year of study. 

The over-all program of the textile technology curriculum includes 
course work in the basic sciences and humanities as well as in the profes 



216 The General Catalog 

sional area of textiles. The arrangement of stems within the curriculum 
permits for specialization in various areas which lead in one direction to 
a hish concentration of work in the basic sciences and in the other direc- 
tion to greater depth in the study of economics. The various avenues of 
selection open to the students are as follows, with specialization as indi- 
cated: fiber and yarn technology, fabric technology, general textiles, knit- 
ting technology, and textile management. 

The latter program provides substantial depth in the fundamentals of 
economics as well as work in the basic sciences, humanities, and profes- 
sional textile areas. It is believed that this program provides a firm founda- 
tion on which to develop business skills. As with the other programs in 
textile technology, the student has further choice within the management 
program depending on his desire to follow micro, macro, or quantitative 
economics. 

Textile chemistry is designed to give the student a fundamental educa- 
tion in chemistry with special emphasis on the application of this science 
to textiles. The textile chemistry curriculum places emphasis on chemical 
fundamentals so that those students who complete this program with a 
high degree of excellence are adequately prepared for graduate study 
cither in pure or applied chemistry. Similarly, students who complete the 
program in any one of the stems in textile technology with a high degree 
of excellence would be acceptable for graduate study in many different 
areas. 

Inasmuch as the professional work in textiles is concentrated to a great 
extent in the last two years in the student's program, it is quite possible 
for students from either junior colleges or other institutions of higher 
learning to transfer to the School of Textiles with a minimum loss of 
time. 

Degrees 

Upon completion of programs in textile technology, the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in textile technology is conferred. Upon completion of 
the program in textile chemistry, the degree of Bachelor of Science in tex- 
tile chemistry is conferred. 

The degree of Master of Science in textile technology or of Master of 
Science in textile chemistry is offered for the satisfactory completion of a 
minimum of one year of graduate study in residence. Candidates for the 
degree of Master of Science enter and are enrolled in the Graduate School 
ol the College. A Master of Textile Technology degree is also offered. For 
general requirements, consult the Graduate School Catalog. 

Facilities 

The Nelson Textile Building, erected in 1939 and greatly enlarged in 
1950, was designed to coordinate teaching and laboratory facilities. It 
houses one of the most modern and best-equipped textile institutions in 
the world. The Department of Textile Chemistry is housed in remodeled 
Mangum Hall, one hundred yards south of the Nelson Textile Building. 



Textiles 217 

Opportunities 

Technological advances in textile fibers and manufacturing techniques 
have created a tremendous demand for men technically trained in textile 
colleges. For the past several years, the School of Textiles has had a demand 
for graduates greater than it could supply. Its graduates have entered the 
textile industry at salaries equal to or better than those offered in many 
other industries. 

Graduates of the school are equipped to enter many fields related to 
textiles, such as manufacturing, sales or research; and alumni of the school 
hold responsible positions in each of these fields. Many are now mill presi- 
dents or general managers. 

Some of the specific fields selected by State College textile graduates 
are production of yarns, production of woven and knitted fabrics, dyeing 
and finishing, industrial engineering, quality control, designing, styling, 
merchandising, converting, research, cost and production control, and 
sales of equipment and materials to the textile industry. 

To assist in the placement of students and alumni and to facilitate in- 
terviews by textile firms, the school maintains a full-time placement di- 
rector. 

Inspection Trips 

For certain of the textile courses offered, it is desirable for the stu- 
dent to see the manufacturing process under actual operating conditions. 
When possible, trips are arranged for student groups to visit outstand 
ing manufacturing plants. Participation in the trips is required; transpor 
tation costs and other travel expenses, while held to a minimum insofar 
as possible, must be paid by the student. 

Short Courses 

It is the policy of the school to offer course training for textile mill men 
who have a limited amount of time to spend at the school. These courses 
are offered when a sufficient demand for them develops. The subject mai 
ter is selected to meet the needs of the group. 

Distinguished Professorships 

The School of Textiles has four sponsored professorships. These are 
made possible by funds contributed to the North Carolina Textile Foun- 
dation, Inc., and especially designated to pay a part of the annual salary 
of the professor selected to fill the position. 

The four professorships, together with the year of establishment and the 
name of the incumbent for each, are as follows: 

Burlington Industries Professorship of Textiles 1946, Dame S. Hamby, 
professor of textiles. Department of Textile Technology. 

Chester H. Roth Professorship of Knitting Technology 1948, William 
Edward Shinn, professor of textiles and head of Department of Knitting 
Technology. 



218 The General Catalog 

Abel C. Lineberger Professor of Yarn Manufacturing 1948, Elliot Brown 
Grover, professor of textiles and head of Department of Textile Technol- 
ogy- 

Edgar and Emily Hesslein Professorship of Fabric Development 1948. 

(open) 



Department of Knitting Technology 

Professor Wn.LL\M E. Shinn, Head of the Department and Director, Knitting Research 
Assistant Professor: 

H. M. MiDDLETON, Jr. 
Instructor: 
Peter Li 

In recognition of the great importance of knitting and the other needle 
arts in the industrial life of this section, the Department of Knitting 
Technology makes available to this branch of the textile industry, person- 
nel trained in the fundamentals and practices underlying the production of 
knitted textiles. 

Curriculum 

Knitting technology students follow the textile technology curriculum 
and elect Stem 4. For a list of the curriculum by years see pages 225 and 
226. 

Focilities 

The laboratories of the Knitting Technology Department, organized and 
equipped for instruction in many phases of the knit-goods industry, are 
grouped as follows: 

Seamless Hosiery 

Equipment for instruction in seamless hosiery production includes re- 
presentative types of machines arranged in two groups. The more elemen- 
tary types, including ribbers and plain hosiery machines with the elemen- 
tary attachments such as stripers, reverse plating and rubber top attach- 
ments, are arranged together for beginning students. The more advanced 
types are grouped together for advanced students. This line includes ad- 
vanced rib type machines, Komets, Banner Wrap Reverse, several types of 
float stitch machines, and machines for the manufacture of hosiery with 
solid color patterns. 

Nylon Hosiery 

This section is equipped with full-fashioned hosiery knitting machines 
of modern types, in 45-gauge, 51-gauge, 54-gauge, and 66-gauge. There is 
provided also three 400-needle women's nylon hosiery machines of the cir- 
cular type. This equipment forms the basis lor instruction in the general 
course in hosiery manufacture and for the more advanced instruction in full 



Textiles 2 1 9 



fashioned hosiery production. Equipment for the looping and seaming of 
hosiery, for pre-boarding, dyeing and finishing of fine hosiery is provided in 
separate rooms. 

Circular Knitweor 

A wide assortment of large diameter fabric knitting machines is provided 
for demonstration and instruction in the production of cloth for both un- 
derwear and outerwear. This group includes latch needle and spring needle 
types for jersey, rib, interlock and Jacquard fabric. 

Gorment Cutting and Seoming 

A laboratory for experimental garment design and manufacture has been 
set up with modern power cutting equipment and many types of industrial 
sewing machines for producing garments for both outerwear and under- 
wear. This unit is supplemented by knit goods finishing equipment located 
in the hosiery and knitwear finishing laboratory. 

Warp Knitting, Flat Knitting 

The knitting department laboratories include eight warp knitting ma- 
chines of the tricot and raschel types. These machines furnish the basis 
for instruction in the design analysis, and production of warp knitted 
fabrics. A collection of fabrics and several winding and ^varp preparation 
machines make it possible to process a variety of materials. Flat machines 
of the V-bed and links-and-links class are employed for instruction in the 
producton of heavier knitwear such as sweaters. 

Knit Goods Finishing 

Devoted entirely to experimental work in hosiery and knit goods finish 
ing, this laboratory contains modern equipment for pre-boarding, dyeing 
and finishing machinery, a knit goods calendar for finishing knitted tubing, 
and a fabric brush. 



Department of Textile Chemistry 

Professor Henry A. Rutherford, Head of the Department and Director, Chemical Research 
Professor: 

K. S. Campbell 
Associate Professors: 

A. C. Hayes, D. M. Gates, Associate Director, Chemical Research 

The purpose of the Department of Textile Chemistry is to instruct students 
in the chemistry of natural and synthetic fibers, and in the theory and 
practice of scouring, bleaching, dyeing, finishing and printing of yarns 
and fabrics; to conduct laboratory experimental work demonstrating the 
principles set forth in lecture periods; to cooperate with the mills of the 
State in solving problems relating to the wet processing of textile materials. 



220 The General Catalog 

Curriculum 

Two recent changes in the curriculum in textile chemistry have re- 
sulted in a strengthening of the program. In the senior year, the student 
is given the option of electing a course of study which includes physical 
chemistry or may in its place elect a stem of courses in textile technology. 
In the latter, three areas are provided which furnish depth in quality 
control, fabric technology, or yarn technology. A student may elect also 
a three-course sequence of a minimum of nine semester hours in psychology, 
industrial engineering, or from the School of General Studies. 

Students who expect to pursue a course of graduate study are urged to 
take the chemistry option. The technology option is primarily for students 
who expect to go into production. 

In either option, the curriculum places emphasis on the fundamentals 
of chemistry. Adequate background in social sciences and humanities is 
also provided. 

Graduate Studies 

A master's degree in textile chemistry is offered for the satisfactory com- 
pletion of one year of graduate study in residence. The program in textile 
chemistry and its related area, polymer science, is intended to provide pro- 
fessional training at the graduate level. The student with a bachelor's de- 
gree in chemistry or chemical engineering will generally have the academic 
background to undertake it. The student with a major in physics may 
desire to enroll in one or two undergraduate courses in chemistry to erase 
certain deficiencies. 

Five courses, that are described in the section on Description of Courses, 
(TC 403, 404; TC 511, 512; TC 605; and TC 606), are the core of the 
education plan at the graduate level. The selection of courses beyond the 
ones mentioned depends on the student's interest and the nature of his 
thesis research. The objective is to stimulate basic research and to train 
scientists in the general field of fiber and polymer chemistry, with proper 
emphasis on the supporting sciences. Although fiber-forming polymers are 
emphasized, the program is broad in scope, providing an opportunity for 
training and research in general principles in the polymer field, as well as 
advanced study in chemistry, physics, and mathematics. 

Fellowships and assistantships are available for qualified students. 

Facilities 

Facilities available in textile chemistry follow: 

Dyeing Laboratory 

This is a complete laboratory with generous provision for bench space, 
equipment storage facilities, utilities and steam baths. It is used for all 
laboratory work dealing with chemical properties of textiles, dye synthesis, 
color matching and all types of dyeing. 



Textiles 



221 



Dye House 

In this room is assembled a collection of dyeing and finishing machinery 
for instructional and experimental purposes. Obtained over the last £ew 
years, the equipment includes a singeing machine, a continuous dyeing 
range of the pad-steam type, a Williams unit, a du Pont-type continuous 
bleaching unit, four package dyeing machines, a dye beck, dye jig, rotary 
hosiery dyeing machine, piece goods dyeing and finishing units utilizing 
dry cans, enclosed tenter frame and a continuous loop drying and curing 
unit supplied with both steam and gas-fired heat sources and a laboratory 
calendar. 

Re«eorch ond TexHIe Chemical Analysis 

Six laboratories equipped for chemical research on fibers and on textile 
chemical specialties are available for use by advanced undergraduate stu- 
dents working on special problems and for research. Equipment includes 
a reflectometer, a spectrophotometer with all supplementary apparatus, 
colorimeters and the common testing equiment used for evaluation and 
for determining color-fastness, wash-fastness, etc., of dyed fibers and fabrics. 



Textile Chemistry Curriculum 



Fall Semester 

ENG 111, English 

CH 105, Chemistry 

MA 101, Mathematics 

HI 252, U. S. History 

•MS 101, Military Science I 

or 
•AS 121, Air Science I .___ 



»PE 101, Physical Education 



Freshman Year 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

3 ENG 112, English 3 

4 CH 107, Chemistry „ 4 

5 MA 102, Mathematics 4 

3 TX 221, Fundamentals of Textiles 3 

ME 101, Engineering Graphics 2 

•MS 102, Military Science I 

1 or 

1 •AS 122, Air Science I 1 

'PE 102, Physical Education 1 

17 

18 



Sophomore Yeor 



Fall Semester 

MA 211, Calculus 
PY 211. Physics 

CH 221, Organic Chemistry 

TX 281, Fiber Quality 

•MS 201, Military Science U 
or 

•AS 221. Air Science II 

•PE 201, Physical Education .._ 



Credits 

3 

4 

4 

...... 3 



16 



Spring Semester 

MA 212, Calculus 

PY 212, Physics 

••English Elective 

CH 223, Organic Chemistry .. 
TX 261, Fabric Structure .... 
•MS 202, Military Science II 
or 

•AS 222, Air Science II _ 

•PE 202, Physical Education 



Credits 

3 

4 

3 

4 

3 



. I 

. 1 

19 



• Students excused from militofv or air science and/or physical education will schedule equivalent 

credits in courses from the following departments: Economics, English, History and Political Science, 

Modern Languages, Philosophy ond Religion, Psychology, Rural Sociology, Social Studies, or Sociology. 

••If approved in advance, students who average C or above on composition, English 111, 112 may 

substitute 6 credits of modern languages. 



222 



The General Catalog 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 



Credits 
__ 3 



•English Elective 

••Humanities, Economics 

or Social Science 6 

ST 361. Introduction to Statistics 3 

TC 303, Textile Chemistry III 3 

Electives 3 



18 



Spring Semester 

PS 201, American Government 

Humanities or Economics 

TX 327, Textile Testing 

CH 215, Quantitative Analysis . 
TC 304, Textile Chemistry III 
Electives 



Credits 

__ 3 

3 

.._.. 4 

4 

3 

3 



20 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



TC 403, Textile Chemical Technology 
rC 405. Textile Chemical Tech. Lab- 

rC 511, Chemistry of Fibers — 

TC 412, Textile Chemical Analysis 

Electives 

CH 431, Physical Chemistry (1) 

or 
Stem Hours (See below) (2) 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

TC 404, Textile Chemical Technology 3 

TC 406, Textile Chemical Tech. Lab_ 2 
TC 501, Seminar in Textile 

Chemistry 2 

TX 581, Instrumentation 3 

Electives 3 

CH 433, Physical Chemistry (1) 5 

or 
Stem Hours (See below) (2) 4 

16 or 17 



(1) Only for students electing chemistry option. 

(2) Only for students electing technology option. 

Credits Required— Freshman year, 35; sophomore year 35; junior year 38; senior year, Physical 
Chemistry Option 33; total 141. Senior year Technology Stem Option, 34; total 142. 



Stem 1. (luality Control 

TX 521, Textile Testing II 

TX 522, Textile Quality Control 
Transfer to free electives 



Stem Requirements 

Credits Stem 2. Fabric Technology 

. 3 TX 365, Fabric Technology ._ 

3 TX 575, Fabric Analytics and 

1 Characteristics 



Credits 
4 



Stem 3. Yarn Technology Credits 

TX 303, Fiber and Yarn Technology 4 

TX 430, Continuous Filament Yams 
or 

TX 436, Staple Fiber Processing 3 



Stem 4. General 

Students electing this stem must take a three-course sequence totaling a minimum of nine 
semester hours. The sequence will generally he selected from courses in psychology, industrial 
engineering, or from the School of General Studies. The sequence must be approved by the 
student's adviser. 



• If approved in advonce, students who average C or above on composition, English 111, 112 may 
substitute 6 credits of modern language. 
** Students electing Stem 4 moy use these credits in conjunction with the stem hours to take a three- 
course sequence in psychology, industrial engineering, or economics. 



Textiles 223 

Department- of Textile Technology 

Processor Elliot B. Grover, Head of the Department and Textile Research 
Professors: 

J. F. BocDAN, Director, Processing Research, D. S. Hamby, J. A. Porter 
Associate Professors: 

W. E. MosER, J. E. Pardue, W. C. Stuckey, Jr. 
Assistant Professors: 

E. B. Berry, J. W. Klibbe, W. E. Smith, R. E. Wiccins 
Instructors: 

I. A. Birkan, James A. King, L. T. Lassiter. W. K. Lynch, H. I. Makhlouf 

The purpose of the Department of Textile Technology is to instruct stu- 
dents in the theory and fundamental concepts, at both the basic and ad- 
vanced levels, of fiber properties and fiber processing through yarns and 
fabrics. This is accomplished through the systematic study of the engi- 
neering properties of both the materials being processed and of the equip- 
ment involved in manufacturing. In addition, the department is engaged 
in research, with the support for the basic areas of work coming from 
college funds, and applied research through the sponsors of the work. Not 
only faculty, but graduate and, when practical, undergraduate students are 
encouraged to participate in the research programs. 

Curriculum 

The curriculum in textile technology involves a basic education for 
the first two years in the physical sciences, humanities, and social sciences. 
After the student has completed this phase of his education, he is then 
taught the application of the fundamental sciences to the areas of textile 
technology. 

The textile technology curriculum represents a new approach to textile 
education. It is directed towards a common first year within the school with 
standardized basic requirements in physical sciences. The major portion of 
course work in textile technology is deferred to the junior and senior 
years in order to provide the best possible background for students before 
entering the major field. 

The primary objective of the textile technology curriculum is to pro- 
vide as general an education as possible and at the same time to prepare 
the graduate for profitable employment in the textile industry. This is 
accomplished through an integration of physical sciences and the applica- 
tion of the sciences and economics to the field of textiles. 

In addition to the wide selection of basic sciences, the student also has 
the opportunity for diversification within the School of Textiles. The 
curriculum offers depth in such selected areas as fiber and yarn technology, 
fabric technology, knitting technology, general textiles, and textile manage- 
ment. 

The curriculum for the one year Bachelor of Science program in textile 
technology for approved college graduates is found on page 230. 

Graduate Studies 

The Department of Textile Technology offers a graduate program lead- 
ing to a degree of Master of Science in textile technology. This program 



224 The General Catalog 

is designed for students interested in advanced study directed toward in- 
dividual research and investigations, and is so developed that students may 
major in the field of textile technology and minor in approved areas such 
as statistics, industrial engineering, and textile quality control. A limited 
number of fellowships and scholarships are available to students who 
qualify. The Master of Textile Technology degree program is designed for 
the student primarily interested in manufacturing, sales, management, and 
other non-scientific or non-technical aspects of the textile industry. This 
degree does not require a thesis or a foreign language. 

Facilities 

The facilities of the Department of Textile Technology are subdivided 
into respective areas for processing cotton and other short staple fibers; 
woolen, worsted and long staple synthetic fibers; continuous filament 
yams; warp preparation and slashing; cam, dobby, and jacquard weaving; 
physical testing; and applied research laboratories. 

Cotton and Short Staple Synthetics 

This area is complete in respect to the most modern of opening, picking, 
carding, combing, drawing, roving, spinning, winding, and twisting equip- 
ment. The laboratory facilities are kept up-to-date which enables the 
school to maintain one of the most complete and modern facilities of 
this type in the world. 

Woolen, Worsted, and Long-Staple Synthetic Fibers 

A laboratory is set up for the processing of wool and long-staple synthetic 
fibers and blends. Included in the equipment is a Davis and Furber Wool 
Unit, complete from machinery to handle blending through spinning. 
Another set of machinery in this laboratory is designed to process the 
longer staple natural and synthetic fibers on the American worsted and 
new fiber systems. Tow-to-top machines, rectilinear combs, intersecting 
gills, wide ratch roving and spinning frames, and other supplemental 
equipment permit the processing of these fibers in many commercially 
oriented paths into spun yarns. 

Continuous Filament Yarns 

The continuous filament laboratory has the complete range of equip- 
ment necessary for the processing of thrown yarn and includes: soaking 
tub, extractor, dryer, twist-setting oven, spooler, upstroke twisters, doubler 
twister, quill winder, cone winders, and nylon sizing machine, plus 
supplementary equipment such as a texturizing machine. 

Worp Preparation and Slashing 

The equipment for preparing yarn for weaving includes a modern high 
speed warper, rayon-type slasher, and a small scale experimental slasher, 
as well as auxiliary equipment. There is also a silk-type combination warper 
and beamer used for making short warps for student instruction. There is 
a separate room for drawing in warps. 



Textiles 225 
Com, Dobby, and Jacquard Weaving 

The weaving facilities are subdivided into three laboratories: cam, jac- 
quard, and dobby weaving. On this equipment instruction is given in 
how to produce such fabrics as print cloths, denims, sateens, ginghams, 
fancy shirting, dobby weave dressing and drapery materials, pile, leno 
and jacquard fabrics, woven from natural and synthetic fibers. All weave 
rooms are completely humidified. 

Physical Testing 

There are three separate air-conditioned laboratories, two of which are 
used for teaching and undergraduate student work and another for indus- 
trial research and graduate student research. 

The laboratories contain all equipment for the physical testing of fibers, 
yarns and fabrics. Included in the equipment are a complete range of fiber 
testing equipment, three Instron Testers, several torsion and other types 
of balances, several combination skein and fabric breaking machines, in- 
clined plane testers, single strand pendulum testers, Uster dynamometer, 
bursting strength testers, drying ovens, abrasion machines, twist testers, 
hydrostatic pressure tester, automatic reels, permeability testers, eight 
evenness testers, three Uster spectrographs, and many other type of labora- 
tory equipment, including both commercial and special instruments de- 
veloped at the school. In addition, the laboratory contains microscopes, 
cross sectioning devices and equipment for photomicrography. A dark- 
room containing the necessary equipment for photographic work is also 
available. 

Applied Research Loboratories 

Four separate laboratories for applied research in fiber processing and 
weaving are located in this department. These laboratories are completely 
equipped and designed for research by students and faculty in the areas 
of fiber processing, warp preparation and weaving. 

Textile Technology Curriculum 

(Fiber and Yarn Technology, Fabric Technology, General Textiles, and Knitting Technology 
Stems) 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101, Chemistry ...._ 4 CH 103, Chemistry _ 4 

•MA 101, Mathematics 5 *MA 102, Mathematics _ 4 

ENG 111, English 3 ME 101, Engineering Graphics 2 

HI 252, U. S. History _ 3 ENG 112, English _ 3 

••MS 101, Military Science I TX 221, Fundamentals of Textiles 3 

or ''MS 102, Military Science I 

••AS 121, Air Science I 1 or 

••PE 101. Physical Education 1 ••AS 122, Air Science I 1 

••PE 102, Physical Education 1 



17 



18 



• Students below a selected cut-off point in placement tests in mothematics will take Mathematics, 

MA 111, 112 and one more hour of free electives. In oddition, they must take either Stem 3 or 4. 

'* Students excused from military or air science and/or physical education will schedule equivalent 

credits in courses from the following departments: Economics, English, History and Political Science, 

Modern Languages, Philosophy and Religion, Psychology, Rurol Sociology, Social Studies, and Sociology. 



226 



The General Catalog 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 



Credits 
..... 5 



PY 201, Physics 

and 
MA 201. Calculus _ 4 

or 
PY 211, Physics - - 4 

and 

•Elecdves from Schedule A 3 

••English 3 

PS 201, American Government 3 

TX 261, Fabric Structure 3 

•••MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

•••AS 221, Air Science II 1 

•••PE 201, Physical Education 1 



Spring Semester Credits 

PY 202, Physics 5 

and 
MA 202, Calculus 4 

or 
PY 212, Physics 4 

and 

•Electives from Schedule A 4 

Humanities or Economics _ 3 

TX 281, Fiber Quality 3 

••*MS 202, Military Science II 

or 

••♦AS 222, Air Science II ...-. 1 

***PE 202, Physical Education 1 

16 or 17 



18 or 20 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



••English .. S 

ST 361, Statistics .— 3 

TX 303, Fiber and Yarn Tech 4 

TC 201, Textile Chemistry I 2 

TX 365, Fabric Technology 4 

TX 342, Knitting Principles 2 



Spring Semester 

TX 327, Textile Testing 

Free Electives 

Stem Hours 

•♦••Elective from Schedule A 



Credits 

4 

3 

..._. 8 
3 



15 or 18 



18 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester Credits 

Humanities 3 

TX 581, Instrumentation 3 

TC 307, Textile Chemistry _. 4 

TX 442, Knitted Fabrics 3 

Free Electives 3 

Stem Hours 3 



Spring Semester 

Social Sciences — 

TX 485, Mill Design and 

Organization 

Free Electives 

Stem Hours 



Credits 
3 

3 

6 

5 



19 



17 



Credits required— freshman year, 33; sophomore year, 36; junior year, 36; senior year, 36; total 
hours, 141. 



* Students selecting this sequence of courses must re-schedule hours in second semester of sopho- 
more and junior year. 
•* If approved in advance, students who average C or above on Composition, English 111, 112, may 

substitute 6 credits of modern languages. 
•** Students excused from military or air science and/or physical education will schedule equivalent 
credits in courses from the following departments: Economics, English, History and Political 
Science, Modern Languages, Philosophy and Religion, Psychology, Rural Sociology, Social Studies, 
or Sociology. 
••••Students electing PY 201, 202; MA 201, 202 sequence do not toke this course. 



Textiles 227 



Stem Requirements 



(Fiber and Yarn Technology, Fabric Technology, General Textiles, and Knitting Technology 
Stems) 

Stem 1 and 2 require the MA 201, 202 sequence. 

Stem 1. Fiber and Yarn Technology Credits Stem 2. Fabric Technology Credits 

TX 304, Fiber & Yarn Tech. 4 TX 366. Fabric Technology _ 4 

TX 436, Staple Fiber Process 3 TX 575, Fabric Analytics and 

TX 430, Cont. Filament Yarns 3 Characteristics 3 

and eitlier TX 478, Design and Weaving 3 

TX 366, Fabric Technology 4 and either 

and TX 304, Fiber and Yarn Tech. __... 4 

TX 483, Textile Cost Methods 2 and 

or TX 483, Textile Cost Methods ... 2 

Selection from Schedule B 6, 7, or 8* or 

Selection from Schedule B 6, 7, or 8* 

16 (to 18) 



16 (to 18) 

Stems 3 and 4 do not require MA 201, 202 sequence. 

Stem 3. General Textiles Credits Stem 4. ** Knitting Technology Credits 

TX 304. Fiber & Yarn Tech. . 4 TX 483, Textile Cost Methods 2 

TX 366, Fabric Technology ._. 4 TX 430. Continuous Filament Yarns ...... 3 

IX 483, Textile Cost Methods 2 TX 441. Flat Knitting 3 

Electives from Schedule C 6 TX 444, Garment Manufacture 3 



TX 447, 448, Advanced Knitting 

16 Lab 4 

Transfer to Free Electives 1 

16 

Schedule A 

Schedule A is comprised of two or three-course sequences totaling in each 
case a minimum of eight semester hours. The sequence elected by the stu- 
dent must meet with the approval of his adviser. Illustrative of the se- 
quences would be studies in the areas of industrial engineering, industrial 
psychology, economics, or other approved fields of study. Any differences 
in hours between the minimum of eight which are required and the 10 
allocated may be transferred to free electives. 

Schedule B 

Schedule B is comprised of two-course sequences totaling in each case 
a minimum of six credit hours. The sequence elected by the student must 
meet with the approval of his adviser. Illustrative of the sequences would 
be studies in the areas of mechanics and strength of materials, advanced 
statistics, advanced physics, industrial engineering, textile quality con- 
trol, and other approved courses of the 300 level or above in the physical 
or applied science field. 

Schedule C 

Schedule C is comprised of two-course sequences in the field of textiles 
totaling in each case a minimum of six credit hours. Illustrative of the 
sequences available are the following: 



• Any hours above the six allocated may be taken from free electives. 
'• Either Mothematics — Physics sequence is acceptable. 



228 



The General Catalog 



Credits 
TX 436, Staple Fiber Processing 3 

and 
TX 430. Continuous Filament Yarns .... 3 
TX 575, Fabric Analytics and 

Characteristics 3 

and 

TX 478, Design and Weaving 3 

TX 521, Textile Testing II 3 

and 
TX 522, Textile Quality Control 3 



Schedule D 



Schedule D is comprised of a three-course sequence from one of the 
following fields totaling in each case a minimum of nine credit hours: 
English, foreign languages, history, political science, sociology, psychology, 
natural science, and physical science. 



Textile Technology Curriculum (Monogement Option) 



Freshman Year 



Fall Semester 

CH 101, Chemistry 

•MA 101, Mathematics 

ENG 111. English _ 

HI 252, U. S. History 

••MS 101, Military Science I 
or 

••AS 121, Air Science I 

••PE 101, Physical Education 



Credits 

4 

5 

3 

3 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 103, Chemistry 4 

•MA 102, Mathematics 4 

ME 101, Engineering Graphics 2 

ENG 112, English 3 

TX 221, Fundamentals of Textiles 3 

•*MS 102, Military Science I 
or 

••AS 122, Air Science I ._ 1 

••PE 102, Physical Education _._ _ 1 



18 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



PY 211, Physics 4 

MA 201, Mathematics 4 

or 

•••MA 211, Mathematics 3 

PS 201, American Government 3 

TX 261, Fabric Structure 3 

EC 201, Economics _ 3 

••MS 201. Military Science II 

or 

••AS 221. Air Science II 1 

••PE 201, Physical Education 1 



18 or 19 



Spring Semester Credits 

PY 212, Physics ..._ 4 

MA 202, Mathematics 4 

or 

•••MA 212, Mathematics 3 

TX 281. Fiber Quality 3 

EC 301, Economics 3 

••MS 202, Military Science II 
or 

••AS 222, Air Science II _ 1 

••PE 202. Physical Education 1 

15 or 16 



* wl'*®!"/? below o selected cut-off point in placement tests in mathematics will take Mothematics, 

MA III, 112 and one more hour of free electives. 
Students excused from military or air science ond/or physical education will schedule equivalent 
credits in courses from the following departments: Economics, English, History and Political Science, 
Modern Languages, Philosophy and Religion, Psychology, Rural Sociology, Social Studies, or Sociology. 
♦•• Students selecting this option transfer 2 hours to free electives. 



Textiles 



229 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



ST 361, Statistics ..._ 3 

TX 303, Fiber and Yarn Technology .... 4 

TC 201, Textile Chemistry I _ 2 

EC 302, Economics _ 3 

Stem Hours 6 



U 



Spring Semester 
* English 



Credits 



TX 365, Fabric Technology ._ 4 

TX 327, Textile Testing 4 

Free Electives 3 

Stem Hours 3 



17 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester 

•English 

TC 307, Textile Chemistry II 

rX 342, Knitting Principles 

Free Electives 

Stem Hours _ 



Credits required— fresh 
141. 



Credits 

3 

4 

2 

3 

6 



18 



Spring Semester Credits 

TX 485. Mill Design and 

Organization 3 

EC 490, Senior Seminar in Economics .... 3 

Free Electives 6 

Stem Hours 6 



18 



man 



year, 33; sophomore year, 37; junior year, 35; senior year, 36; total 



Additional Stem Requirements 



Stem 5. Micro-Economics Credits 

EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 3 

EC 410, Industry Studies 

or 
EC 413, Competition, Monopoly 

and Public Policy 3 

Two courses from the following in 
economics: EC 310, EC 410, or EC 

413. EC 440, EC 446, and EC 448 6 

Selection from Schedule D 9 



Stem 6. Macro-Economics Credits 

EC 312. Accounting for Engineers 3 

EC 440, Economics of Growth 3 

EC 444, Economic Systems 3 

EC 448, International Economics 3 

Selections from Schedule D 9 



21 



21 



Stem 7. Applied Economics Credits 

EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 3 

EC 410, Industry Studies 
or 

EC 450, Economic Decision Processes 3 

EC 552, Econometrics 3 

••MA 405, Introduction to Determi- 
nants & Matrices 3 

Selections from Schedule D 9 



21 



If approved in odvance, students who overage C or above on Composition, English 111, 112, may 

substitute 6 credits of modern language. 
•MA 202 is a prerequisite for MA 405. Therefore, students taking Stem #7 must toke MA 201, 

202 rather than MA 211, 212. 



230 The General Catalog 

One Year Bachelor of Science Curriculum 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

l\ 221, Fundamentals of Textiles 3 TX 304, Fiber and Yarn Technology 4 

rX 261, Fabric Structure _ 3 TX 327, Textile Testing _.. 4 

IX 281, Fiber Quality - 3 TX 365, Fabric Technology 4 

TX 303, Fiber and Yarn Technology - 4 TX 430, Continuous Filament 3 

TX 342, Knitting Principles 2 TX 485, Mill Design and Organization 3 

•ST 361, Introduction to Statistics 3 

18 

18 

Summer Semester 

First Session Credits Second Session Credits 

TC 307, Textile Chemistry 4 TX 366, Fabric Technology 4 

TX 436, Staple Fiber Processing 3 



Students completing this program may continue to the graduate level if scholastic average 
is suitable. 



* If appropriate background has been received in statistics a substitution may be made for this course. 

Texf-ile Research 

The School of Textiles is actively engaged in a program of basic and applied 
research both State-supported and sponsored, carried on primarily in the 
educational departments concerned. In textile chemistry, the overall direc- 
tion is under Professor Henry A. Rutherford, head of the department. Dr. 
David Gates is the assistant director of chemical research, handling pri- 
marily basic areas, and W. R. Martin, Jr., heads the sponsored and applied 
areas. In the Department of Textile Technology, which encompasses all 
the areas outside those involved in chemistry and knitting, the overall di- 
rection is under Professor E. B. Grover, head of the department, with 
Professor John F. Bogdan in direct charge of all sponsored programs. Re- 
search in knitting technology is under the direction of Professor W. E. 
SRinn, head of the Department of Knitting Technology. 

Textile Machine Development 

C. M. AsBiLL, Jr., Head 

The Department of Textile Machine Development was established to 
assist the textile industry and the students of the School of Textiles in 
matters relating to textile processing machinery and testing apparatus. 

Specifically the objective of the department is to make available to the 
textile industry and to the faculty and students of the School of Textiles 
the facilities of a qualified textile engineering department with means 
for the design, construction and testing of new or improved equipment. 

The department attempts to keep informed as to modern machinery and 
practices by maintaining close contact with textile mills and machine man- 



Textiles 231 



ufactureis as well as by a digest of technical articles and patents, and by 
participation in technical and scientific conferences. 

The physical facilities of the department include a completely equipped 
machine shop and electronics section, together with thoroughly trained 
operating personnel. 



Textile Placement Bureau 

Professor George H. Dunlap, Director 

The Placement Bureau is a clearing house for students in the graduating 
class and for textile alumni. It is a coordinating agency for the employer 
and the graduates of the School of Textiles. The Placement Bureau tries 
to keep an accurate file of all textile alumni and the progiess they have 
made. Therefore, all alumni are requested to notify the director when they 
receive a promotion or transfer from one organization to another. 



Textile Library 

Adriana p. Orr, Librarian 

As a result of a substantial gift by the Burlington Mills Corporation, the 
Textile Library was relocated in the Textile Building in 1951. The new. 
enlarged quarters were designed to incorporate the latest functional im- 
provements. 

The library was organized in 1944 incorporating the entire textile col- 
lection from the D. H. Hill Library. There are now about 9,000 volumes 
of which 3,000 are bound periodicals. The library subscribes to 150 cur- 
rent periodicals, both American and foreign, which are thoroughly in- 
dexed in Industrial Arts Index, Chemical Abstracts, Natural and Synthetic 
Fibers, Textile Technology Digest, and Textile Institute Journal Ab- 
stracts. 

In addition to books and periodicals, the librarian and student assistants 
maintain files of pamphlets, reprints, trade catalogs, and patents. Special 
card indexes have been prepared for these collections. 

The holdings of the Textile Library are available on loan not only to 
students and faculty of the College but also to research workers and in- 
dustry employees throughout North Carolina. 






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233 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

DONALD B. ANDERSON, Vice President, Graduate Studies and Reseorch, Chapel Hill 
WALTER J. PETERSON, Dean, Raleigh 

The Graduate School of the Consolidated University of North Carolina is 
composed of three divisions, one at each of the three institutions of the 
University. Each unit is administered by a graduate dean and an admin 
istrative board representing the various degree-granting areas in each in- 
stitution. The vice president for Graduate Studies and Research is the ad- 
ministrative officer of the Consolidated University who has responsibility 
for the development of policy in all graduate programs and for the co- 
ordination of the activities of the graduate schools at each of the three uniu 
of the University system. 

Master's Degrees 

At State College graduate instruction is offered in the following fields: 
agriculture, education, engineering, forestry, physical sciences and applied 
mathematics, and textiles. The Master of Science degree is offered in each 
of these areas. The Professional Master's degree, also offered in some of 
these fields, is intended for students who are interested in the more ad- 
vanced applications of fundamental principles to specialized fields rather 
than in the acquisition of the broader background in advanced scientific 
studies which would fit them for careers in research. 

Docfor of Philosophy Degree 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered in the following fields: agri 
cultural economics, agricultural engineering, animal science, applied 
mathematics, applied physics, bacteriology, botany (in the fields of physio- 
logy and ecology) , ceramic engineering, chemical engineering, civil engi- 
neering, crop science, electrical engineering, entomology, experimental 
statistics, food science, forestry, genetics, mechanical engineering, nuclear 
engineering, plant pathology, rural sociology, soil science, and zoology 
(in the fields of ecology and wildlife biology) . 

Students interested in graduate study should consult the Graduate 
School Catalog which is sent to them upon request. Inquiries should be 
addressed to: Dean of the Graduate School, North Carolina State College, 
Raleigh, North Carolina. 



235 



COLLEGE EXTENSION DIVISION 

EDWARD W. RUGGLES, Director 

The College Extension Division's services, which cover a multitude of 
fields, are designed for persons who cannot attend classes on the campus 
and for designated groups and communities. 

There must be a sufficient number of persons registered for a course for 
it to be held. In setting up courses, such matters as distance from the 
College, nature of the subject, and availability of instructors must be taken 
into consideration. 



Correspondence Courses 

Correspondence courses for college credit are offered in agriculture, 
architecture, economics, education, engineering, English, entomology, 
geology, history, political science, mathematics, modern languages, psy- 
chology, rural sociology, sociology, and statistics. In these fields there are 
more than 75 courses offered. 

The Correspondence Bureau also has a program of four high school 
courses— English review, review of elementary algebra, solid geometry, 
and plane geometry. These non-credit courses give high school graduates 
an opportunity to fullfill the college entrance requirements and also assist 
persons who make low scores on their entrance examinations. 

Other correspondence courses may be taken for professional credit rather 
than college credit. 



Evening College 

The Evening College is another Extension Division service. Each fall 
and spring semester, a series of college credit courses is presented on the 
State College campus for residents of the Raleigh area. In addition, there 
are offerings of hobby and vocational classes. Similar courses are offered 
in communities where the demand is sufficiently great and other courses 
are conducted at military bases in North Carolina. 



236 The General Catalog 

The Evening College offers resident credit for extension night class 
work and its program allows persons to work towards a degree. 

The Extension Division conducts a series of night classes in sub-freshman 
mathematics on the State College campus. 

Short- Courses and Conferences 

A wide variety of short courses and conferences are planned each year by 
the Extension Division in cooperation with several State College schools. 

Among these specialized courses are those designed for electrical meter 
engineers, veterinarians, sawmill operators, pest control operators, clay 
plant operators, gas plant operators, dry kiln operators, nurserymen, and 
artificial breeders. 

Included among the other short courses offered annually are the cattle- 
men's conference, dairymen's conference, swine conference, pesticide 
school, and the State garden schools plus courses in statistical quality con- 
trol, furniture finishing, grain marketing, farm and small business income 
tax, sport fishing, job evaluation, quality control, cotton classing, warm 
air heating and air conditioning and a short course for commercial flower 
growers. 

Other programs available are dairy herd testing, nutrition school, oil bur- 
ner schools, textile conferences, quality concrete conference. North Caro- 
lina press mechanical conference, short courses in modern farming, indus- 
try research conference, safety school, nuclear engineering courses, and 
scores of other programs which benefit trade and professional groups. 

Other courses offered are or pertain to improving managerial capacity, 
egg industry, pest control operators, soft frozen dairy products, industrial 
engineering seminar, surveying, state highway conference, public works 
conference, roofing and sheet metal forum, southeastern park and recrea- 
tion training institute, industrial ventilation conference, electrical super- 
visors, plumbing inspectors, maintenance of commercial vehicles, stop 
watch time study, fire alarm superintendents and professional driver train- 
ing. 

The Gaston Technical Institute is conducted by the Extension Division 
as a division of the College's School of Engineering. Gaston Tech, located 
in Gastonia, offers four two-year technical training courses in electrical, 
civil, electronics, and mechanical-production technology. A separate cata- 
log on the Institute and its currciula is available upon request. 

The North Carolina Truck Driver Trainino; School conducts 12 four- 
week training courses for professional truck drivers each year. These schools 
are sponsored by the N, C. Motor Carriers Association. A bulletin giving 
complete details and application fonns is available. 

For additional information, persons interested in extension classes, cor- 
respondence courses, or any of the other programs sponsored by the Ex- 
tension Division should write: Mr. Edward W. Ruggles, Division of College 
Extension, North Carolina State College, Raleigh, North Carolina. 




I V 





<^lAi«* 





'::r^si^ -i^ ;'4*ifc;-(CjSwyiI-i 



239 



DESCRIPTIONS OF COURSES 



In a typical course description, the semester hours of credit, the number of actual lecture and 
laboratory hours of meeting per week, and the term or terms in which the course is offered 
are shown in this manner: 2 (l-2)f s. 

The two indicates the number of semester hours credit given for satisfactory completion 
of the course. The (1-2) indicates that the course meets for one hour (number on the left) 
of lecture and for two hours (number on the right) of laboratory work each week. The f s 
designation (fall semester and spring semester respectively) indicates that the course may be 
taken either during the fall or spring semester. 

Agricultural Economics 

Courses for Undergraduates 

AGC 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 

An introduction to the economic principles underlying agricultural production and market- 
ing; organization for production in agriculture; consumers and their influence upon the 
demand for agricultural products; relationships between agriculture and other segments of 
the economy; dynamic factors in the economy which affect agriculture. Staff 

AGC 303 Organization and Business Management of Farms 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

An application of basic economic principles and techniques to the problems facing a farm 
business; use of budgeting, programming, systems analysis and other modern techniques to 
determine what, how, and how much to produce when faced with numerous alternatives; 
analysis of problems associated with firm size and the acquisition of adequate resources; use 
and analysis of farm records as an aid to better management. Two all-day Saturday field 
trips are required of all students. Messrs. Ihnen, Hoover 

AGC 311 Organization and Business Management of Marketing Firms 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

A study of the agricultural marketing system and the current economic forces affecting its 
structure and efficiency; decision-making by agricultural business firms, with some discussion 
of integration and inter-firm relationships. Effects of monoply in marketing relative to 
government policies of control. Classroom discussion is supplemented by visits to marketing 
firms and by practical problems illustrating firm decisions. A laboratory period will be in- 
cluded in alternate weeks beginning with the second full week of classes. Students are expected 
to individually examine the marketing problems associated with the commodity of their 
choice. Messrs. Peeler, Simmons 

AGC 322 Organization and Management of Cooperatives 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

A study of the principles of cooperation applied to farmers' purchasing, marketing, and 
service cooperatives; the role of cooperatives in our society, and problems associated with 
organization, operation, and management. 
(Offered in Spring 1963 and alternate years) Mr. King 



240 The General Catalog 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

AGC 413 Farm Appraisal and Finonce 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 303 

Examination of the source of productivity and value of farm inputs; a critical analysis of, 
and practice in the use of, farm appraisal procedures currently used for land and buildings; 
review of the sources of, and repayment practices used in, short and intermediate credit in 
agriculture; consideration of the forces operating in the whole economy with an exami- 
nation of the implications of these changes for both the lender and borrower in agriculture. 

Mr. Hoover 

AGC 431 Agricultural Price Anolysis 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

Principles of price formation; the role of prices in the determination of economic activity; 
the interaction of cash and futures prices for agricultural commodities; methods of price 
analysis, construction of index numbers, analysis of time series data including the estimation 
of trend and seasonal variations in prices. Staff 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

AGC 512 Economic Analysis of Agricultural Factor Markets 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

This course is oriented to the relative significance of land, labor and capital as factors of 
production in a modern agricultural economy, including major changes in the respective roles 
of these factors of production in recent years. An examination is made of the changes in 
characteristics of the supply and demand for these factors. The structure and efficiency of 
markets for these factors, including relevance of the institutional and attitudinal setting in 
each type of market, and nature of the demand-supply equilibration will be investigated. 
Public policies as they affect efficiency of the factor markets and other goals relating to the 
use of the basic factors of production in agriculture also will be considered. Mr. ToUey 

AGC 521 Procurement, Processing and Distribution of Agricultural Products 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 311 or equivalent 

A study of marketing firms as producers of marketing services and their role in the pricing 
process; the influence of government policies on their behavior of marketing firms; methods 
for increasing the efficiency of marketing agricultural products. Mr. King 

AGC 523 Planning Farm and Area Adjustments 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 303 or equivalent 

The application of economic principles in the solution of production problems on typical 
farms in the state; methods and techniques of economic analysis of the farm business; 
application of research findings to production decisions; development of area agricultural 
programs. Mr. Coutu 

AGC 533 Agriculturol Policy 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

A review of the agricultural policy and action programs of the Federal Government in their 
economic and political setting; analysis of objectives, principal means, and observable 
results under short-term and long-term viewpoints, and under the criteria of resource use 
and income distribution within agriculture, and between agriculture and the rest of the 
economy; appraisal of alternative policy proposals; the effects of commodity support pro- 
grams on domestic and foreign consumption, and some of the international aspects of United 
States agricultural policy; the attempts at world market regulations, and the role of inter- 
national organizations, agreements, and programs. Staff 

AGC 551 Agricultural Production Economics 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

.\n economic analysis of agricultural production, including: production functions, cost func- 
tions, programming and decision-making principles; and the applications of these principles 
to farm and regional resource allocation, and to the distribution of income to and within 
agriculture. Mr. Toussaint 



Agricultural Economics 241 

AGC 552 Consumption, Distribution, and Prices in Agriculture 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 or equivalent 

Basis for family decisions concerning consumption of goods and services and supply of 
productive factors; forces determining prices and incomes; interrelationships between economic 
decisions of the household and the firm. Mr. Henry 

AGC 561 Seminar in Contemporary Economic Problems in Agriculture Maximum 6 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing and consent of the instructor 

Analysis of economic problems of current interest in agriculture. Credit for this course will 

involve a scientific appraisal of a selected problem and alternative solutions. Staff 

Courses for Graduate Students Only 

AGC 602 Monetary and Fiscal Policies in Relation to Agriculture 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite or corequisite: EC 501 or equivalent 

The essentials of monetary theory necessary in interpreting and evaluating monetary and 
fiscal operations and policies as to their effect upon income, employment, and price level; 
the monetary and fiscal structure, and the mechanics of monetary and fiscal operations in 
the United States; and the relation of monetary and fiscal policies to agricultural income and 
prices. Mr. ToUey 

AGC 612 International Trade in Relation to Agriculture 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites or corequisites: AGC 602 and 641 

The principles of international and interregional trade; structures of trade relationships be- 
tween countries engaged in the import or export of agricultural products; attempts at stabiliz- 
ing trade and financial transactions. Staff 

AGC 621 Research in Agricultural Economics Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Agricultural Economics and consent of Graduate Advisory 
Committee 

A consideration of research methods and procedures employed in the field of agricultural 
economics, including qualitative and quantitative analysis, inductive and deductive methods 
of research procedure, selection of projects, planning and execution of the research project. 

Staff 

AGC 631 Economic and Social Foundations of Agricultural Policy 3 (3-0) f 
Prerequisite: AGC 501 or equivalent 

The study of logical and empirical problems of inquiry into public policies and programs 
that affect agriculture; analysis of policy-making processes, interdependencies among eco- 
nomic, political and social objectives and action; the study of forces which shape economic 
institutions and goals and of the logic, beliefs and values on which policies and programs 
that affect agriculture are founded. Staff 

AGC 632 Welfare Effects of Agricultural Policies and Programs 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 642 

Description of the conditions defining optimal resource allocation; application of the condi- 
tions for maximum welfare in appraisal of economic policies and programs affecting resource 
allocations, income distribution, and economic development of agriculture. Mr. Bishop 

AGC 641 Economics of Production, Supply and Market Interdependency 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite or corequisite: EC 501 or equivalent 

An advanced study in the logic of, and empirical inquiry into, producer behavior and choice 
among combinations of factors and kinds and quantities of output; aggregative consequences 
of individuals' and firms' decisions in terms of product supply and factor demand; factor 
markets and income distribution; general interdependency among economic variables. 

Mr. Seagraves 

AGC 642 Economics of Consumption, Demand and Market Interdependency 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ,\GC 641 and ST 513 or equivalent 

An advanced study in the theory of, and research related to, household behavior; aggregative 
consequences of household decisions concerning factor supply and product demand; pricing 
and income distribution; economic equilibrium. Mr. King 



242 The General Catalog 

AGC 651 (ST 651) Econometric Methods I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ST 421, ST 502, and AGC 642 

The role and uses of statistical inference in agricultural economic research; measurement 
problems and their solutions arising from the statistical model and the nature of the data; 
limitations and interpretation of results of economic measurement from statistical techniques. 
Topics include the problems of specification, aggregation, identification, multicolinearity and 
autocorrelation. .Attention also is given to expectations models and simultaneous stochastic 
equations. Mr. Wallace 

AGC 652 (ST 652) Econometric Methods II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ST 522 and AGC 551 

Techniques for problem analysis in agricultural economics; attention to analysis of time 
series data; non-parametric inference; experimental design in economic research; estimation 
of parameters in production functions and in simultaneous models; selected special topics. 

Mr. Anderson 

AGC 671 Analysis of Economic Development in Agriculture 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 641 

A theoretical and empirical study of the processes of economic growth; the problems of 
underdeveloped countries; the role of agriculture in a developing economy; an examination 
of policies and programs needed for effective economic development. Mr. Maddox 



Agricultural Education 

(See Education) 

Agricultural Engineering 



Courses for Undergraduates 

AGE 151, 152 Form Mechanics 2 (1-3) f s 

Prerequisite: Enrollment in ASE or ATE curriculum 

These courses are designed to acquaint Agricultural Engineering students w'th materials and 
tool processes related to the various fields of endeavor in Agricultural Engineering; also to 
develop the student's ability to plan in terms of the manual and managerial skills related to 
the utilization of such materials and processes. Mr. Blum 

AGE 201 Agriculturol Construction and Maintenance I 2 (1-3) f s 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with planning procedures, construction ma- 
terials and woodworking tools, building layout and design, and preventative maintenance. 
Limited laboratory practice in the manual and managerial skills involved in the utilization of 
such information is included. Messrs. Howell, Blum 

AGE 202 Agricultural Construction and Maintenance II 2 (1-3) f s 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the manual and managerial skills in- 
volved in the construction, repair, and maintenance of farm machinery and utilities. The use 
of materials, tools, and facilities needed will be stressed. Considerable emphasis will be placed 
on arc and oxyacetylene welding. Messrs. Howell, Blum 

AGE 21 1 Form Power and Machinery I 3 (2-2) f s 
Corequisite: PY 201 or PY 211 for ASE or ATE students 

A study of modern farm machinery, power units and equipment with emphasis on selection, 

operation, maintenance, care and adjustments from the operator's viewpoint. Staff 



Agricultural Economics 243 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 



AGE 303 Energy Conversion for Agricultural Production 2 (2>0) t 

Prerequisites: BO 103 or ZO 103, MA 112 or MA 201, PY 211 or PY 201 

Energy transformations and exchanges of plants and animals are studied on the basis of 
physical theories and principles. Specific examples in thermal radiation, convection, conduc- 
tion, phase changes, muscle work, photosynthesis, respiration, and concentration of solutions 
will be discussed. Mr. Suggs 

AGE 321 Irrigation, Drainoge and Terracing 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Needs for irrigation in the Southeast and methods of accomplishment; methods of draining 
excess water from agricultural areas; the use of basic surveying equipment; and the need for 
and methods of accomplishing erosion control by mechanical measures to supplement vege- 
table programs. Staff 

AGE 331 (FS 331) Food Engineering 3 (2-2) • 
Prerequisite: PY 211 

Fundamentals of power application in the processing and preservation of perishable food 

products. Mr. Jones 

AGE 332 Farm Buildings and Crop Processing 3 (2-3) • 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Construction materials, structural features and design loads. Functional planning of farm 
buildings for housing domestic animals and for storing and handling farm crops. Curing and 
drying of farm crops. Messrs. Blum, Weaver 

AGE 341 Farm Electrification and Utilities 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Problems and general study in the proper selection and use of applicable farm electric equip- 
ment and allied utilities. Mr. Weaver 

AGE 371 Soil and Water Conservation Engineering 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisites: CE 201, SSC 200 

General aspects of agricultural hydrology, including precipitation, classification of climate, 
rainfall disposition, methods of estimating runoff, fundamental soil and water relationships, 
and hydraulics of flow in open channels and closed conduits, will be given. Included also are 
factors affecting erosion, methods of controlling erosion, land use classification, drainage, land 
clearing, irrigation methods, design requirements for portable irrigation systems, and eco 
nomic aspects of irrigation in the Southeast. Mr. Wisei 

AGE 401 Problems in Farm Mechanics 3 (2-2) t 

Prerequisites:. AGE 201, 202, Enrollment in Agricultural Education 

A study of the mechanical activities engaged in by the vocational agriculture teacher; with 
emphasis on the role of the teacher in the area of agricultural engineering technology. In 
eluded is a study of facilities, equipment, and shop management. Mr. Howell 

AGE 411 Farm Power and Machinery MB 3(2-3) f t 

Prerequisite: AGE 211 

This course is designed to provide students in Agricultural Engineering Technology with a 
knowledge of the operations of manufacturing and distribution organizations of farm ma- 
chinery and their places in these organizations. Included is a practical course in farm tractors 
and engines with emphasis on familiarizing the student with component parts— their appli- 
cation, operation, and maintenance, as well as with the selection of these units from the 
standpoint of power, performance, and ratings. Messrs. Fore, Greene 

AGE 451 Conditioning Principles for Plant ond Animal Systems 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 301 

Principles of heat transfer and diffusion are presented using the mathematical equations to 
point out analogous systems. The use of electric analogs to describe thermal and diffusion 
fields is demonstrated. Psychromctric and heat transfer principles are used to indicate methods 
of conditioning the environment in agricultural structures. Thin layers drying theory and 
dimensional analysis are used to describe bulk drying systems of agricultural crops. 

Mr. Jordan 



214 The General Catalog 

AGE 452 Senior Seminar 1 (1-0) s 

Students will prepare talks in their particular field of interest, presenting them to the group. 
Also, two or three field trips to selected points of educational opportunities will be made 
during the semester. Maximum of two credits allowed. Mr. Hasslei 

AGE 462 Farm Power and Machinery IIA 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisites: AGE 211, EM 301 

A study of engineering analysis as it applies to problems in the power and machinery field 
of Agricultural Engineering. The course is intended to strengthen the students ability to 
approach agricultural engineering problems in a systematic manner. Mr. Bowen 

AGE 481 Agricultural Structures as Production Units 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisites: AGE 451. EM 301 

Application of conditioning principles to provide the required environment for optimum agri- 
cultural production is stressed. Environmental requirements of animals and of harvested crops 
are discussed. Analysis for labor reduction and the replacement of human decisions with 
electric controls are indicated. Environmental requirements, proper arrangement, equipment, 
equipment selection and control, and estimation of external loads are presented to indicate 
the design procedures for a sound, functional building. Mr. Jordan 

AGE 491 Rural Electrification 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: EE 320 

Wiring and circuitry for both single and three phase applications of electricity to farm and 
rural community processes and operations. A very brief study of the local and regional organi- 
zation as developed by the electric industries for the dependable generation, transmission, and 
distribution of power. Electric motor characteristics and selection are studied in the laboratory 
along with those of water systems, feed grinders and mixers; lighting systems, cooling, venti- 
lating, heating, and the application of switches and controls. Mr. Weaver 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

AGE 551 Special Problems Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing in Agricultural Engineering 

Each student will select a subject on which he will do research and write a technical report 
on his results. He may choose a subject pertaining to his particular interest in any area of 
study in Agricultural Engineering. Mr. Hassler, Staff 

AGE 552 Instrumentation for Agricultural Research and Processing 1 (0-2) f 

Prerequisites: EE 320, MA 301 

Elaboration of the theory and principles of various primary sensing elements. Relates the 
output signal of electrical transducers to wheatstone bridge and potentiometer measuring cir- 
cuits for calibration of the signal with the variable under study. Introduces the principles of 
circuits and mechanisms used for indicating, recording, and/or controlling process variables. 
Representative equipment will be employed whenever feasible. Mr. Splinter 

Courses for Graduates Only 

AGE 651 Research in Agricultural Engineering Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Agricultural Engineering 

A maximum of six credits is allowed toward a master's degree; no limitation on credits for 

doctorate program. 

Performance of a particular investigation of concern to Agricultural Engineering. The study 

will begin with the selection of a problem and culminate with the presentation of a thesis. 

Graduate Staff 

AGE 652 Seminar 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
A maximum of two credits is allowed. 

Elaboration of the subject areas, techniques and methods peculiar to professional interest 
through presentations of personal and published works; opportunity for students to present 
and defend, critically, ideas, concepts and inferences. Discussions to point up analytical solu- 
tions and analogies between problems in Agricultural Engineering and other technologies, and 
to present the relationship of Agricultural Engineering to the socioeconomic enterprise. 

Mr. Hassler 



Agriculture 245 

AGE 654 Agricultural Process Engineering 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 511 

Generalized classical thermodynamics is extended by Onsager's relations to provide a theore- 
tical basis for analyzing the energetics of systems that include life processes. 

Mr. Johnson 

AGE 661 Analysis of Function and Design of Form Machinery 3 (2-3) f or s 

Prerequisite: PY 401 

Methods and tools used in determining the functional requirements of machine components; 
writing of machine specifications in terms of fundamental parameters; introduction of the 
principles of discriminate and indiscriminate mechanical selection of agricultural products 
with emphasis on the theory of servo-systems. Mr. Bowen 

AGE 671 Theory of Drainage Irrigation and Erosion Control 4 (3-3) f or s 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

Emphasis is placed on the physical and mathematical aspects of problems in conservation 
engineering and an attempt is made to rationalize procedures which have often come about 
through experience rather than through analytical considerations. Examples are presented of 
cases where such an analytical approach has already improved, or shows promise of improving, 
design criteria and procedures. Mr. van Schilfgaarde 

AGE 681 Analysis of Function and Design of Farm Buildings 4 (4-0) f or s 

Prerequisite: AGE 481 

A study of the functional requirements of farm structures with respect to man, animals and 
crops and development of the means for providing structures which fulfill the functional 
requirements. Application of the science and art of engineering in the solution of environ- 
mental problems. Advanced planning in the integration of structural and environmental 
design. Mr. Jordan 



Agriculture 

AG 103 Introduction to Agriculture 1 (0-2) f 

A study of Agriculture as a profession and as it relates to the entire economy of the United 
States. 

AC 311 Agricultural Communications Methods and Media 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and 112 

Designed to give an insight into the communications process; written, oral and visual tech- 
niques of communications; a survey of the channels of communications available; and tech- 
niques for using these channels individually or combined into a publicity or public relations 
information program. Mr. Carpenter 

AG 401 Principles and Methods of Extension Education 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing (Graduate credit in special cases with permission of committee) 
A study of the background, development and operation of the Agricultural Extension Service. 
Consideration is given to major events leading to the establishment of Agricultural Extension, 
its objectives, organization and philosophy. Major emphasis is placed upon the principles un- 
derlying extension education together with methods of program building and teaching. 

Mr. Sloan 



Air Science 



The Basic Course 



AS 121 Air Science I 1 (0-1) f 

During the fall semester, each student will be required to participate in the Leadership Lab- 
oratory program for one hour per week. Classroom requirements will be met by the satis- 
factory completion of at least three academic hours of an approved course in the field of 
mathematics, modern languages or humanities. 



246 The General Catalog 

AS 122 Air Science I 1 (2-1) s 

An introductory examination of the factors of aerospace power, major ideological conflicts, 
requirements for military forces in being, responsibilities of citizenship, development and tradi- 
tions of tlie military profession, role and attributes of the professional ofiBcer in American 
democracy, organization of the armed forces as factors in the preservation of national security, 
and the United States Air Force as a major factor in the security of the free world. 

AS 221 Air Science II .1 (2-1) f 

An introductory survey of aerospace missiles and craft, and their propulsion and guidance 
systems; target intelligence and electronic warfare; nuclear, chemical and biological warhead 
agents; defensive, strategic and tactical operations; problems, mechanics and military impli- 
cations of space operations; and a survey of contemporary military thought. 

AS 222 Air Science II 1 (0-1) s 

Leadership laboratory will continue; however, the classroom requirements will be met by 
satisfactory completion of at least three academic hours of an approved course in the fields 
of physical or natural sciences or in the intermediate levels of mathematics, modern languages, 
humanities or social sciences. 



The Advanced Course 

The leadership laboratory program continues for one hour per week throughout the advanced 
course with students assuming command and control of progressively larger units and greater 
responsibilities. 

AS 321 Air Science III 1 (2-1) f 

Prerequisites: Basic Air Science Courses 

Instruction deals with staff organization and functions, and the skills required for effective 
staff work, including oral and written communications and problem solving; basic psychologi- 
cal and sociological principles of leadership and their application to leadership practice and 
problems. Classroom requirements will be partially met by the satisfactory completion of either 
SOC-301. SOC-501, or EC-426. 

AS 322 Air Science III 2 (3-1) s 

Study continues in principles of leadership, and instruction includes communicating and in- 
structing in the Air Force and an introduction to military justice. 

AS 421 Air Science IV 2 (3-1) f 

Prerequisite: Air Science III 

Instruction deals with weather and navigation, a flying instruction program, and an intensive 
study of global relations of special concern to the Air Force officer with emphasis on inter- 
national relations and geography. 

AS 422 Air Science IV 1 (2-1) s 

The study of the military aspects of world political geography continues; course includes a 
briefing for commissioned service and the leadership laboratory. Classroom requirements will 
be partially met by the satisfactory completion of one of these courses: PS-302, HI-415, SS-301, 
SS-302, SS-491, SS-492. 



Summer Training Unit 

An integral part of the Advanced Course is the Summer Training Unit, a four-week encamp- 
ment at an active Air Force Base. During the summer encampment a cadet is trained in the 
use of weapons, in close-order drill; he will participate in physical training, competitive 
sports, orientation flying and will become familiar with aerospace vehicles and emergency 
equipment; he will observe at first hand various organizations on the base in the performance 
of their everyday operations. Normally a student enrolled in the advanced course will attend 
a Summer Training Unit between his junior and senior years; under unusual circumstances, 
attendance can be postponed until the summer following completion of degree requirements. 



247 

Animal Science 

Courses for Undergraduates 

ANS 201 Elements of Dairy Science 4 (3-3) f s 

Fundamental principles of milk production; breeds, selection, feeding and management of 
dairy cattle; composition, quality and food value of milk products; principles of processing 
and manufacturing dairy products. Mr. Everett 

ANS 202 Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 4 (3-3) f s 

Principles of feeding, managing and marketing meat animals. Year to year and seasonal price 
trends and relationships. Relation of slaughter grades to carcass cut-out values. 

Mr. Goode 

ANS 302 Selecting Dairy and Meat Animals 2 (0-6) f 

A study of dairy and meat animals including desired characteristics in breeding and market 
animals and relating to productive performance. Market classes and grades of beef cattle, 
sheep and swine and relation of live animal grade to carcass grade will be studied. Herd 
book study, pedigree evaluation and breed history and organization will be included. 

Messrs. Murley and Gregory 

ANS 303 (FS 303) Meot and Meat Products 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CH 451 

Study of live animal and carcass relationship, dressing percentages and cut-out values. 
Slaughtering, cutting, curing, freezing and handling of meat and meat products for commercial 
and home use. Messrs. Blumer, Craig 

ANS 308 Advanced Selecting Dairy and Meot Animals 1 (0-3) s 

Prerequisite: ANS 302 

Intensive practice on developing proficiency in selecting techniques for dairy and meat ani- 
mals with emphasis on oral reasons. Visits will be made to leading farms to study different 
breeds. Messrs. Murley, Gregory 

ANS 309 (FS 309) Meat Selection 1 (0-6) f 

Detailed consideration of factors involved in selection of carcasses and wholesale cuts of beef, 
pork and lamb. Practice in identification of wholesale and retail cuts. Mr. Blumer 

ANS 312 Principles of Livestock Nutrition 3 (3-0) s 
Prerequisites: CH 431, ZO 301 

Fundamentals of modem animal nutrition, including classification of nutrients, their general 

metabolism and roles in productive functions. Mr. Ramsey 

ANS 404 Dairy Form Problems 3 (2-3) s 
Prerequisite: ANS 201 

Advanced study of practical dairy farm management including farm records, farm buildings, 

sanitation, roughage utilization and herd culling. Mr. Murley 

ANS 406 Animal Science Seminar 1 (1-0) s 

Review and discussion of special topics and the current literature pertaining to all phases of 
animal science. Mr. Porterfield 

ANS 407 Advanced Livestock Production 4 (3-3) s 
Prerequisites: GN 411 and ANS 312 

A study of the economic, nutritional, genetic, physiological and managerial factors affecting 

the operation of commercial and purebred livestock enterprises. Mr. Barrick 

ANS 408 Reproduction and Lactation 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 301 

Anatomy of the reproductive organs and mammary glands with detailed coverage of the 
physiological processes involved and of factors controlling and influencing them. A special 
research problem selected by the student is required. Messrs. Mochrie, Myers, Ulberg 



248 The General Catalog 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ANS 503 (GN 503) Genetic Improvement of Livestock 3 {2-S) f 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

Traits of economic importance in livestock production, and their mode of inheritance. Pheno- 
typic and genetic relationships between traits. The place of selection, inbreeding and cross- 
breeding in a program of animal improvement. Mr. Robison 

ANS 505 Diseases of Farm Animals 3 (3-0) f 
Prerequisites: CH 101, CH 203; BO 421 desired 

The pathology of bacterial, virus, parasitic, nutritional and thermal diseases, and mechanical 

disease processes. Mr. Batte 

ANS 507 Topical Problems in Animal Science Maximum 6 f s 

Special problems may be selected or assigned in various phases of Animal Science. A maximum 
of six credits is allowed. Staff 

ANS 513 Needs and Utilization of Nutrients by Livestock 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ANS 312 or equivalent 

Measurement of nutrient needs of livestock and the nutrient values of feeds. Nutritive require- 
ments for productive functions. Mr. Wise 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ANS 600 Research in Animal Science Credits by orrongement f s 

A maximum of six hours is allowed toward the master's degree; no limitation on credits in 
doctorate programs. 

ANS 601 Seminar in Animal Nutrition 1 (1-0) f s 
Prerequisite: Permission of seminar leaders 

Orientation in philosophy of research; preparation for research in agriculture, and general 

research methodology. Nutrition Staff 

ANS 602 (GN 602) Population Genetics in Animal Improvement 3 (Arranged) f 
Prerequisites: ST 512 and GN 512 

A study of the forces influencing gene frequencies, inbreeding and its effects, and alternative 

breeding plans. Mr. Legates 

ANS 603 Animal Nutrition: Mineral Metabolism 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CH 551 

Principles of mineral metabolism with emphasis on metabolic functions, reaction on mechan- 
isms and interrelationships. Mr. Matrone 

ANS 604 (ZO 604) Experimental Animal Physiology 4 (2-4) ff 

Prerequisite: ZO 513 or equivalent 

A study of the theories and techniques involved in the use of animals in physiological investi- 
gation. Messrs. Ulberg, Wise 

ANS 614 (BO 614) Bacterial Metabolism 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: BO 514 or equivalent and CH 551 

The energy metabolism of bacteria; synthesis of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, purines, 

pyrimidines, and nucleic acids; bacterial photosynthesis; enzyme formation and metabolic 

control mechanisms; active transport systems. Mr. McNeill 

ANS 621 (CH 621) Enzymes and Intermediary Metabolism 4 (3-4) f 

Prerequisites: CH 511 and permission of instructor 

A study of the properties of enzymes and enzyme action; intermediary metabolism of carbo- 
hydrates, lipids, fatty acids, vitamins, purines and phorphrins; metabolic energy relation- 
ships. Mr. Tove 



Anthropology 249 

ANS 622 (CH 622, St 622) Principles of Biological Assays 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisites: CH 551 and ST 512 

Techniques and designs of biological assays for vitamins. The interrelationship of logical prin- 
ciples, design and analysis is emphasized. Messrs. Smart, Tove 



Anthropology 

(Also see Sociology) 

Courses for Undergraduates 

ANT 251 Physical Anthropology 3 (3-0) f 

The study of the development of man as a species; analysis of the formation and spread of 
races; introduction to archaeology as a study of the material remains of ancient man and his 
activities. 

ANT 252 Culturol Anthropology 3 (3-0) s 

The analysis of various living societies and their cultures in terms of social adjustment to 
recurrent needs. 

ANT 305 Peoples of the World 3 (3-0) f • 

This course seeks to develop insights of wide applicability concerning human relationships and 
the adjustment of man to his geographical, social, and cultural environments. The course is 
designed to demonstrate interrelationships among diverse factors affecting human behavior 
in all societies. 

ANT 410 Theories of Culture 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301 or equivalent 

The study of major anthropological theories of culture with intensive analysis of their appli- 
cation. 



Architecture 

Courses for Undergraduates 

ARC 201, 202 Architectural Design I, II 4 (3-6) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 102 

Required of second year students in Architecture and Landscape Architecture 

Introductory exercises in architectural design. The design of small buildings of specific 

function and simple construction which can be related to the student's experience; emphasis 

on the influence of environment, climate, etc. 

Messrs. Boaz, Buisson, Clarke, Waugh, Wurman 

ARC 300 Historic Architecture Research 2 credits s 

Prerequisite: ARC 202 , 

Required of all students in Architecture and Landscape Architecture 

Research and the recording of sites, monuments, buildings, or artifacts of historical interest. 

Mr. Shogren 

ARC 301, 302 Architectural Design III, IV 6 (3-12) f s 

Prerequisites: ARC 202, EM 200, PY 211 

Required of third year students in Architecture 

Continuing exercises in architectural design, based on larger buildings with more complex 

interior and exterior relationships. Emphasis on the problems of functional planning, research 

on building requirements, and recognized methods of constructions. 

Messrs. Harris. Shawcroft, Shogren 



250 The General Catalog 

ARC 312 Materials and Specifications 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ARC 202 

Required of third year students in Architecture 

Functional and physical characteristics of building materials; the preparation of architectural 

specifications. Mr. Waugh 

ARC 377, 378 Environmental Factors 3 (3-0) 

An investigation of environmental factors affecting architectural design. Heating and cooling 
systems; and controls and principles of plumbing including venting, drainage, demand and 
load calculations, water distribution, pipe sizing, storm drainage and sprinkler systems in 
first semester. Lighting and acoustical design and electrical equipment and design in second 
semester. Mr. Kahn 

ARC 401, 402 Architectural Design V, VI 6 (3-12) f s 

Prerequisites: ARC 302, CE 339, EM 301 

Required of fourth year students in Architecture 

The design of large buildings or building complexes and economic and sociological influences 

on them, stressing the use of technology and industrialization. Emphasis on the logical 

coordination of the many factors of building design. Mr. Harris 

ARC 421, 422 Structural Design I, II 3 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 339 

Required of fourth year students in Architecture 

Principles and applications of steel and timber design; principles and application of reinforced 

concrete design; and elements of foundations. Mr. Kahn 

ARC 501, 502 Architectural Design VII, VIM 7,9 (3-12) f s 

Prerequisites: ARC 402, ARC 300 

Required of fifth year students in Architecture 

A continuation of ARC 401, 402 with special emphasis on the development of arch-typical 

designs and the use of subjective selection by the designer. An architectural thesis is required 

in the spring semester. Mr. Glowczewski 

ARC 511 Professional Practice 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisite: ARC 312 

Required for graduation in Architecture 

A study of the ethics, organization, and procedures of professional architectural practice; 

building codes, and legal obligations. Mr. Boaz 

ARC 531, 532 Structural Design III, IV 2 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: ARC 422 

Required of fifth year students in Architecture 

Comparative study of structures and structural elements; their possibilities and limitations; 

review and discussion of structural principles. Engineering consultation. Mr. Kahn 



Biology 



BS 301 Fundamentals of Biology 3 (3-0) s 

A survey of the major principles of the biological sciences. A course designed for students who 
have not had a college course in the biological sciences. 

Staff 

Botany and Bacteriology 

Courses for Undergraduates 

BO 103 General Botany 4 (3-2) f s 

An introduction to the field of Botany. Emphasis is placed on the structure, physiology and 
sexual reproduction of green and non-green plants and on the principles of heredity and 
ecology as they apply to these groups. The course may serve as a terminal course or as an 
introduction prior to further study in Botany. Mr. Cooper 



Botany and Bacteriology 251 

BO 201 Aquatic Vascular Plants 2 (1-2) f 
Prerequisite: BO 103 

A comprehensive survey of marsh and aquatic vascular plants with emphasis on identification 

and habitat relationships. (Offered in alternate years. Given in 1962-63.) Mr. Beal 

BO 214 Dendrology 4 (2-4) s 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

.\ systematic survey of the evergreen (gymnosperm) and hardwood (angiosperm) genera and 
species of North .American trees. Emphasis is upon terminology, structure, relationships, and 
identification of woody plants. Mr. Hardin 

BO 301 General Morphology 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: BO 103 or equivalent 

A survey of the principal groups of plants from the standpoint of their structure, develop- 
ment and reproduction. Emphasis is placed on evolutionary relationships as revealed by com- 
parisons in body organization and life histories of living and extinct forms. Some time is 
spent on general identification of the plants in their native habitats. Mr. Hardin 

BO 403 Systematic Botany 3 (0-6) s 
Prerequisite: BO 103 

.-V systematic survey of vascular plants emphasizing field identification, terminology, and gen- 
eral evolutionary relationships. Mr. Beal 

BO 412 General Bacteriology 4 (2-4) f 
Prerequisites: CH 103 or 107 (CH 221, 215 or 411 recommended but not required) 
An advanced biology- course dealing with bacteria and other microorganisms, their structure, 

development, and function. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental concepts and techniques 

in microbiology such as isolation, cultivation, observation, morphology, and the physiology 

and nutrition of bacteria. The applications of microbiology, the role of microbes in nature, 

and their role in infection and immunity are considered. Mr. Elkan 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 (2-4) f s 

Prerequisites: BO 103, 2 courses in chemistry 

An introductory treatment of the chemical and physical processes occurring in higher green 
plants with emphasis upon the mechanisms, factors affecting, correlations between processes, 
and biological significance. Messrs. Scofield and Troyer 

BO 441 Plant Ecology 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

An introduction to the study of plants in relation to their environment. Major topics con- 
sidered are: factors of the environment; the structure, analysis, and dynamics of plant com- 
munities; past and present distribution of vegetation types. Mr. Cooper 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

BO 505 (FS 505) Food Microbiology 

BO 511 Advanced Bacteriology 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisites: BO 412, CH 220, 221 or 223 

This course will present the principles and techniques of isolation and characterization of 
bacteria from a wide range of habitats. Particular stress will be given to the principles of 
enrichment techniques, differentia! and selective media, and pertinent diagnostic tests that are 
applicable to particular gioups of bacteria. Messrs. Evans and Elkan 

BO 512 Morphology of Vascular Plants 3 (1-6) f 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

A study of comparative morphology, ontogeny and evolution of the vascular plants. Em- 
phasis is placed upon the phylogeny of sexual reproduction and of the vascular systems. 

Mr. Ball 



252 The General Catalog 

BO 513 Plont Anatomy 3 (1-6) s 
Prerequisite; BO 103 

A study of the anatomy of the Angiosperms and Cymnospenns. The development of tissues 

is traced from their origin by mcristems to their mature states. Mr. Ball 

BO 514 Introductory Bacterial Physiology 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: BO 412, CH 220. 221 or 223; CH 351 or 551 (May be taken concurrently.) 
Emphasis will be placed on general principles anil function with respect to the living cell. 
Included will be a study of cell structure, growth, death, reproduction, nutrition, and meta- 
bolism. An attempt will be made to illustrate the application of basic principles to applied 
areas of bacteriology and to other areas of basic science. Mr. Evans 

BO 521 Systematic Botany of Monocot Families 3 (0-6) f 

Prerequisites; BO 103, 403 

A comprehensive survey of the systematics and evolution of monocot families. Special em- 
phasis is given to terminology, morphology, identification and relationships. (Offered alternate 
years. Not given in 1962-63.) Mr. Beal 

BO 523 Systematic Botany of Dicot Families 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: BO 103, 403 

A comprehensive survey of the systematics and evolution of dicot families. Special emphasis 
is given to terminology, morphology, identification and relationships. (Offered alternate years. 
Given in 1962-63.) Mr. Hardin 

BO 531 (SOI 532) Soil Microbiology 

BO 534 Physiology of Plant Cells 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: BO 421 or equivalent. Advanced preparation in chemistry or physics may be 
substituted with the permission of the instructor. 

An advanced treatment of basic plant processes at the cellular level with emphasis on theoreti- 
cal principles. Mr. Troyer 

BO 535 Water, Solute, ond Gas Relations of Plants 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite; BO 534 

An advanced treatment of processes of higher plants involving exchange of materials between 
the plant and its surroundings and movement of materials within the plant. Theoretical prin- 
ciples are emphasized. (Offered alternate years. Given in 1962-63.) Mr. Troyer 

BO 536 Growth ond Development of Plants 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite; BO 534 

.^n advanced treatment of the physiology of growth and development of higher plants, with 
emphasis on theoretical principles. (Offered alternate years. Not given in 1962-63.) 

Mr. Troyer 

BO 544 Plant Geogrophy 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites; BO 403, 441, GN 441, or equivalents 

A course in descriptive and interpretive plant geography, synthesizing data from the fields 
of ecology, genetics, geography, paleobotany, and taxonomy. The course will include a survey 
of the present distribution of major vegetation types throughout the world, a discussion of 
the history and development of this picsent pattern of vegetation, and a discussion of the 
principles and theories of plant geography. (Offered alternate years. Given in 1962-63.) 

Mr. Cooper 

BO 545 Advanced Plant Ecology 3 C2-3) s 

Pierequisites: BO 421, 441 or equivalents 

An advanced consideration, through class discussions and individual projects, of the principles, 
theories and methods of plant ecology. Mr. Cooper 

BO 570 (CE 570) Sanitary Microbiology 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites; AGE 211, EM 321 

Fundamental aspects of microbiology and biochemistry arc presented and related to prob- 
lems of stream pollution, refuse disposal and biologi<al ticaiinent. Laboratory exercises pre- 
sent basic microbiological techniques and illustrate from a chemical viewpoint some of the 
basic microbial aspects of waste disposal. Mr. Elkan 



Botany and Bacteriology 253 

BO 574 Phycology 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisite: BO 103 or equivalent 

A systematic study of the structure and classification of the algae, both freshwater and marine. 

The life history and ecology of important local species will be emphasized. 

Mr. Whitford 



Courses for Graduates Only 

BO 614 (ANS 614' Bacterial Metabolism 

BO 620 Advanced Taxonomy 3 (2-2) s 
Prerequisites: BO 521. 523 or permission of instructor 

A course in the principles of plant taxonomy including the history of taxonomy, systems of 
classification, rules of nomenclature, taxonomic literature, taxonomic and biosystematic meth- 
ods, and monographic techniques. Mr. Hardin 

BO 632 (SSC 632) Advanced Soil Microbiology 

BO 635 The Mineral Nutrition of Plants 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: BO 421 and a course in Biochemistry 

Discussion of diffusion, molecular specificity and energetics of active transport. The physical 
chemistry of the essential elements and its significance to their biochemical functions. 

Mr. Kahn 

BO 636 Discussions in Plant Physiology 1 (1-0) s 

Prerequisite: BO 534 

Group discussions at an advanced level of selected topics of current interest in plant physiol- 
ogy. Mr. Troyer 

BO 640 Special Problems in Bacteriology Credits by arrangement f s 

Directed research in some specialized phase of bacteriology other than a thesis problem but 
designed to provide experience and training in research. Graduate Staff 

BO 641 Reseorch in Bacteriology Credits by arrangement f s 

Original research preparatory to writing a master's thesis or a Ph.D. dissertation. 

Graduate Staff 

BO 650 Special Problems in Botany Credits by arrangement f s 

Directed research in some specialized phase of botany other than a thesis problem but designed 
to provide experience and training in research. Graduate Staff 

BO 651 Reseorch in Botany Credits by arrangement f s 

Original research preparatory to writing a master's thesis or a Ph.D. dissertation. 

Graduate Staff 

BO 660 Bacteriology Seminor 1 (1-0) f s 

Specific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of interest to bacteriologists 
are reviewed and discussed. Graduate student credit allowed if one paper per semester is 
presented at seminar. Graduate Staff 

BO 661 Botany Seminar 1 (1-0) f s 
Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of interest to botanists 
are reviewed and discussed. Graduate student credit allowed if one paper per semester is pre- 
sented at seminar. Graduate Staff 



251 The General Catalog 

Ceramic Engineering 

Courses for Undergraduates 

MIC 210 Ceramic Materials and Processes 3 (2-3) f s 

Designed for students not majoring in Ceramic Engineering. Includes raw materials, forming 
processes, effect of thermal treatment, properties and uses of ceramic products. Lecture and 
Laboratory. 

MIC 301 Ceramic Operations I 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: MIM 201 

Unit operations pertaining to ceramic product manufacture. Crushing, grinding, particle size 
classification and packing. Colloidal and Theological properties of slips, slurries, and plastic 
masses. Lecture and Laboratory. 

MIC 302 Ceramic Operations II 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: MIC 301, PY 201 

A continuation of MIC 301. Dewatering of slips and slurries. Properties of air and air-vapor 
mixtures, heat transmission, fluid flow, drying, drier calculations, furnaces, kilns and kiln 
calculations. Lecture and Laboratory. 

MIC 312 Ceramic Process Principles I 4 (3-3) s 

Corequisite: MIC 302 

Effect of heat on non-metallic minerals. Thermodynamic calculations. Industrial fuels and 
combustion, review of heterogeneous equilibria. Crystal structures. Pyrochemical and pyro- 
physical changes in ceramic bodies. Lecture and Laboratory. 

MIC 413 Ceramic Process Principles II 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisites: MIG 312, CH 532 

A continuation of MIC 312. A study of the glassy state to include structure of glass, proper- 
ties and types of glasses. Glazes, enamels, opacity, color and devitrification. Nature of glassy 
phases in kiln fired ceramic bodies. Lecture and Laboratory. 

MIC 414 Senior Thesis 3 (1-6) f s 

One semester required of seniors in Ceramic Engineering. A second semester may be elected. 
An introduction to research. Literature search, laboratory investigation and written report in 
the form of a thesis. Conference and laboratory. 

MIC 415, 416 Ceramic Engineering Design 2 (0-6) f s 

The methods of design of ceramic equipment, structures and plant designing. 

MIC 420 Industrial Ceramics 3 (3-0) s 

A study of the various ceramic industries, including manufacturing techniques, labor and 

professional relationships, and the present and future status of the respective industries. 
Lectures and discussion. 

MIC 425 Seminor 1 (1-0) f s 

One semester required of seniors in Ceramic Engineering. A second semester may be elected. 

Literature survey of selected topics in Ceramic Engineering. Oral and written reports, dis- 
cussions. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MIC 503 Ceramic Microscopy 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIC 531 

Petrographic techniques for the systematic study of ceramic materials and products. Inter- 
pretation and representation of results. 



Ceramic Engineering 255 

MIC 505 Research and Control Methods 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

Interpretation of results, instrumental methods applied to research and product development. 
Statistical quality control. 

MIC 507, 508 Advanced Ceramic Experiments 3 (1-6) f s 

Prerequisite: MIC 414 or equivalent 

Advanced studies in ceramic laboratory experimentation. 

MIC 511 Advanced Studies in Firing 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

Advanced studies of ceramic firing procedures with emphasis on the design, calculation and 

economic evaluation of kilns and furnaces. 

MIC 522 Structural Clay Products 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

The technology of the structural clay products industries with emphasis on the latest de- 
velopments in the field. 

MIC 527 Refractories in Service 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CH 342 

A study of the physical and chemical properties of the more important refractories in re- 
spect to their environment in industrial and laboratory furnaces. 

MIC 540 Glass Technology 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

Fundamentals of glass manufacture including compositions, properties and application of 

the principle types of commercial glass. 

MIC 548 Technology of Cements 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

The technology of the Portland cement industry including manufacture, control and uses. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

MIC 601 Ceramic Phase Relationships 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Heterogeneous equilibrium, phase transformations, dissociation, fusion, lattice energy, defect 

structures, thermodynamic properties of ionic phases and silicate melts. 

MIC 605, 606 Crystal Structures 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 342 

Basic laws of crystal structure. Relation of crystal structure to chemical and physical properties. 

MIC 613 Ceramic Thermal Mineralogy 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MIC 605 

Applications of the principles of thermo-chemical mineralogy to ceramic problems. 

MIC 615, 616 High Temperature Technology 3 (2-3) 

Prerequisite: MIC 613 

An advanced consideration of the generation of high temperatures, furnace designs, and at- 
mosphere controls. Theory of sintering hot pressing and thermo-chemical properties of high- 
temperature materials. 

MIC 650 Ceramic Research 1 to 9 credits per semester 

An original and independent investigation in ceramic engineering. A report of such an in- 
vestigation is required as a graduate thesis. 

MIC 660 Ceramic Engineering Seminar 1 (1-0) f s 

Reports and discussion of special topics in ceramic engineering and allied fields. 

MIC 661 Special Studies in Ceramic Engineering 1 to 3 credits per semester 

Special studies of advanced topics in ceramic engineering. Credit will vary with the topic. 



256 The General Catalog 

Chemical Engineering 

Courses for Undergraduates 

CHE 205 Chemical Process Principles * <3-2) ♦ 

Prerequisites: MA 102, CH 103 

Required of sophomores in Chemical Engineering. 

The calculation of material and energy balances, stoichiometry, gas laws, vapor pressure, 

humidity, saturation, themophysics and thermochemistry. Three lectures and one problem 

period. 

CHE 301, 302 Elements of Chemical Engineering 3 (3-0) f % 

An introduction to principles of chemical engineering including calculations involved in 

industrial processes and equipment. The course is designed for students not majoring in 
chemical engineering. 

CHE 311 Introductory Chemical Engineering 4 (3-3) i 

Prerequisite; CHE 205 

Required of sophomores in Chemical Engineering 

A continuation of CHE 205. One laboratory period is devoted to typical chemical engineering 

measurements. 

CHE 411 Unit Operations I 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 202 

Required of juniors in Chemical Engineering 

Principles of fluid flow, heat transfer, evaporation, etc., with emphasis on design calculations. 

CHE 412 Unit Operations II 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 411 

Required of seniors in Chemical Engineering 

A continuation of CHE 411 with emphasis on the diffusional operations such as absorption, 

distillation, extraction, drying, etc. 

CHE 415 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 4 (3-2) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 311 

Required of juniors in Chemical Engineering 

A study of the laws of thermodynamics and their application to chemical engineering prob- 
lems. Emphasis on the theory, data and approximation methods as applied to physical and 
chemical systems. 

CHE 421, 422 Reactor Energy Transfer 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 202 

Required courses in Nuclear Engineering curriculum 

Thermodynamics, heat tranfer and fluid flow with emphasis on problems and methods used 

in the design and analysis of nuclear reactors. 

CHE 431, 432 Unit Operations Laboratory I and II 3 (1-6) f S 

Prerequisite: CHE 411 

Required of seniors in Chemical Engineering 

Laboratory work on typical apparatus involving the unit operations. Experiments are de- 
signed to augment the theory and data of the lecture courses and to develop proficiency in the 
writing of technical reports. 

CHE 453 Chemical Processing of Radioactive Materials 3 (3-0) 

Consideration of the unique procedures required for the bulk manipulation of radioactive 
chemicals. Particular attention is given to remote operational procedures of precipitation, 
centrifugation, conveying, solvent extraction and ion exchange. Design of apparatus involving 
low maintenance and ease of replacement and cleaning by safe methods is considered. Other 
topics include decontamination procedures and disposal of wastes. 



Chemical Engineering 257 

CHE 460 Seminar 1 (1-0) f t 

One semester required of seniors in Chemical Engineering. 

Literature survey of selected topics in chemical engineering. Emphasis on written and oral 

presentation. 

CHE 470 Chemical Engineering Projects 2 Arronge f • 

Elective for seniors in Chemical Engineering 

Introduction to research through experimental, theoretical and literature studies of chemical 

engineering problems. Oral and written presentation of reports. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CHE 525 Process Measurement and Control 3 Arrange f s 

Prerequisite: CHE 411 

Theory and application of methods for measuring, transmitting, recording and controlling 
such process variables as temperature, pressure, flow rate, liquid level, concentration, humidity, 
etc. Commercial instruments are utilized for study of a wide variety of industrial control 
problems. Recorder-controllers are available to simulating industrial control problems of 
varying difficulty. 

CHE 527 Chemical Process Engineering 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

A study of selected chemical processes with emphasis on the engineering, chemical and econom- 
ic factors involved. 

CHE 540 Electrochemical Engineering 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Physical Chemistry 

The application of electrochemical principles to such topics as electrolysis, electroanalysis, 

electroplating, metal refining, etc. 

CHE 541 Cellulose Industries 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry 

Methods of manufacture and application of cellulose chemical conversion products. Emphasis 
placed on recent development in the fields of synthetic fibers, films, lacquers and other cellu- 
lose compounds. 

CHE 542 Technology of Pulp and Paper 3 Arrange f 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry 

Fundamentals of pulp and paper manufacture with emphasis on recent advances in the field. 
One laboratory period per week is devoted to topics such as digestion and treatment of pulp, 
handsheet preparation and testing, fiber analysis and chemical and physical tests. 

CHE 543 Technology of Plastics 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry 

The properties, methods of manufacture and application of synthetic resins. Recent develop- 
ments in the field are stressed. 

CHE 545 Petroleum Refinery Engineering 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

An introduction to the petroleum industry including (1) nature of petroleum and its fractions, 
octane numbers, viscosity relationships, etc., (2) operations of thermal and catalytic cracking, 
stabilization, alkylation isomcrization, crude fractionation, etc., (3) problem work covering high 
pressure phase relationships and related material. 

CHE 546 Chemical Reaction Rates 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 415 

A basic study of the rates of homogeneous reactions, heterogenous reactions and catalysis. 



258 The General Catalog 

CHE 551 Thermal Problems in Nuclear Engineering 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: ME 302 or 303 or CHE 411 or equivalent 

The design and operation of nuclear reactors and the utilization of the power from them 

involves major problems in nearly every phase of heat transfer, and many important problems 

in fluid flow. Possible solutions to these problems are several affected by the influences of 

radiation on heat transfer media, hazards of handling radioactive substances, etc. The course 

considers the thermal problems of nuclear reactor design and the principles of fluid flow and 

heat transfer necessan.' to their solutions. 

The course is intended for engineers and science students with backgrounds in physics and 

mathematics and elementary thermodynamics. 

CHE 553 Separation Processes in Nuclear Engineering 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 or equivalent 

A study of the principles and techniques of separation and purification of chemical com- 
ponents, based upon mass transfer by diffusion. Specific techniques covered are distillation, 
extraction, absorption and ion exchange, particularly in regard to continuous, counter-current 
operations. Special topics include a survey of fuel processing, technology of uranium processing, 
complexing actions of solvents and halide distillation. 

The course is primarily intended for engineers and science students with backgrounds in 
mathematics, physics and elementary chemistry but who have had no previous course in separa- 
tion processes. 

CHE 570 Chemical Engineering Projects 3 Arrange f s 

Prerequisite or corequisite: CHE 412 

A laboratory study of some phase of chemical engineering or allied field. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

CHE 610 Heat Transfer I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 411 

An advanced course dealing primarily with heat transfer between liquids and solids, optimum 
operating conditions and design of equipment, conduction, heating and cooling of solids, 
radiant heat transmission. 

CHE 611 Heat Transfer II 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: CHE 610 

An intensive study of recent advances in heat tranfer and allied fields. 

CHE 612 Diffusional Operations 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

An advanced treatment of mass transfer particularly as applied to absorption, extraction, drying, 

humidification and dehumidification. 

CHE 613 Distillation 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

Vapor-liquid equilibria of non-ideal solutions, continuous distillation of binary and multi- 
component systems, batch distillation, azeotropic and extraction distillation. 

CHE 614 Drying of Solids 2 (2-0) 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

An advanced course on the mechanism of drying operations with application to design of 

equipment, such as cabinet, tunnel, rotary, drum and spray driers. 

CHE 615 Thermodynamics I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 415 

Advanced topics in Chemical Engineering thermodynamics including equilibria of physical and 
chemical systems, high pressure systems, generalized properties of hydrocarbons, etc. 

CHE 616 Thermodynamics II 2 (2-0) S 

Prerequisite: CHE 615 

An intensive study of recent advances in thermodynamics. 



Chemistry 259 

CHE 617 Catalysis of Industrial Reactions 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: CHE 546 

A study of the mechanism of catalysis with emphasis on practical application to operation 

and design of industrial process. 

CHE 631, 632 Chemical Process Design 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

Design and selection of process equipment, through solution of comprehensive problems in- 
volving unit operations, kinetics, thermodynamics, strength of materials and chemistry. 

CHE 641, 642 Advanced Chemical Engineering Laboratory 2 Arrange f • 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

Advanced laboratory work in a selected field with emphasis on theory, techniques and per- 
formance of equipment. 

CHE 650 Advanced Topics in Chemical Engineering 1 to 3 credits per semester f • 

A study of recent developments in chemical engineering theory and practice, such as ion 
exchange, crystallization, mixing molecular distillation, hydrogcnation, fluorination, etc. The 
topic will vary from term to term. 

CHE 660 Chemical Engineering Seminar 1 credit per semester f a 

Literature investigations and reports of special topics in chemical engineering and allied fields. 

CHE 680 Chemical Engineering Research 1 to 9 credits per semester f t 

Independent investigation of an advanced chemical engineering problem. A report of such an 
investigation is required as a graduate thesis. 



Chemistry 

Courses for Undergraduates 



CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 (3-2) f s 

The language of chemistry, fundamental chemical laws and theories, limited study of selected 
chemical elements, compounds, reactions, and processes. 

Messrs. White, Blalock and staflE 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 101 

Homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium, oxidation and reduction, metallurgy, funda- 
mental properties of metals, non-metals and their compounds, introductions to organic and 
nuclear chemistry, industrial applications of some metals, non-metals and their compounds. 
The laboratory work is mostly semimicro qualitative analysis. 

Messrs. White, Blalock, and staff 

CH 105 General Inorganic Chemistry 4 (3-3) ft 

The language of chemistry, fundamental laws and theories, limited study of selected chemi- 
cal elements, compounds and reactions. Emphasis upon atomic structure. Designed for students 
who plan to take advanced courses in chemistry. Messrs. Freedman and Jones 

CH 106 General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 1 (0-3) f 

Corequisite: CH 105 

Laboratory work to supplement the laboratory of CH 105. Staff 

CH 107 General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 105 

Homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria and their applications to qualitative analysis; 
limited study of selected chemical elements, compounds, and reactions; introduction to nuclear 
chemistry. Emphasis upon ionic equilibria. The laboratory work is mainly semimicro quali- 
tative analysis. Designed for students who plan to take advanced courses in chemistry. 

Staff 



260 The General Catalog 

CH 108 General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis Laboratory 1 (0-3) f « 

Corequisite: CH 107 

Laboratory work to supplement CH 107. Staff 

CH 215 Quontitotive Analysis 4 <3-3) f ■ 
Prerequisite: CH 103 

One semester course in volumetric and gravimetric analysis. Includes techniques, stoichiometry 

and principles of neutralization, oxidation and precipitation methods and the chemistry of 

representative laboratory determinations. Mr. Oliver 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 103 

An introduction to the fundamental principles of organic chemistry included in the study 
of the hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, acids and derivatives, esters, phenols, 
fats, carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins, and a selected group of natural and synthetic prod- 
ucts, ^r. Robinson 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 107 or CH 103 

Fundamentals of organic chemistry covering both aliphatic and aromatic compounds. 

Messrs. Loeppert and Reid 

CH 222 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1 (0-3) f 

Corequisite: CH 221 

Laboratory v^rork to supplement CH 221 Staff 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 221 

A continuation of CH 221 Messrs. Loeppert and Reid 

CH 224 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1 (0-3) s 

Corequisite: CH 223 

Laboratory work to supplement CH 223 Staff 

CH 231 Introductory Physical Chemistry 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 103 and MA 112 

Designed for students whose background in mathematics and physics is not sufficient to 
meet the requirements of the CH 431-433 physical chemistry course, but who desire in- 
struction on chemical principles in addition to that provided at the freshmen level. 

Staff 

CH 351 Introductory Biochemistry 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 220 

The fundamental chemistry of living matter. Mr. Ingram 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

CH 411 Analytical Chemistry I 4 (2-6) s 

Prerequisites: CH 431, 432; Corequisites: CH 433, 434 

An introduction to analytical chemistry, including both classical and modern techniques in- 
volving the distribution of a component between phases; for example, gravimetric methods, 
gas chromatography and adsorption. Messrs. Long and Pinkerton 

CH 413 Analytical Chemistry II 4 (2-6) f 

Prerequisite: CH 411 

A continuation of Analytical Chemistry I with emphasis upon modern approaches to acid-base 

chemistry, oxidation-reduction, potentiometric methods, and spectrophotometry. 

Messrs. Long and Pinkerton 



Chemistry 261 

CH 420 Organic Preparations 3 (1-6) f s 
Prerequisites: Three years of chemistry including CH 223 

Experiments selected to acquaint the student with advanced methods and techniques in the 

preparation of organic substances. Mr. Doak 

CH 431-433 Physical Chemistry I and II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 107, MA 202 and PY 202 

An intensive study of the states of matter, solutions, colloids, homogeneous and heterogeneous 
equilibrium, reaction kinetics, electrolysis, conductance, oxidation reactions, and ionic equil- 
brium. Messrs. Getzen, Bowen, and Sutton 

CH 432-434 Physical Chemistry Laborotories 1 (0-3) f s 

Corequisites: CH 431 and CH 433 

Laboratory courses to accompany lecture work in Physical Chemistry I and H respectively. 

Staff 

CH 435 Physicol Chemistry III 3 (3-0) f 
Prerequisite: CH 433 

An intensive study of the structure of atoms and molecules, an introduction to statistics, and 

selected topics in modem physical chemistry. Staff 

CH 441 Colloid Chemistry 3 (2-3) s 
Prerequisites: CH 220 and CH 215 

Adsorption, preparation, properties, constitution, stability, and application of sob, gels, 

emulsions, foams, and aerosols; dialysis, Donnan membrane equilibrium. Mr, Getzen 

CH 491 Reading in Honors Chemistry Credits by arrangement f t 

A reading course for exceptionally able students at the senior level. The students will do 
extensive reading in areas of advanced chemistry and will present written reports of their 
findings. Staff 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CH 501 Inorganic Chemistry I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CH 433 

A course in modem inorganic chemistry from the point of view of the chemical bond. Topics 
covered are: chemical periodicity and its origins in atomic structure; the ionic bond and 
electronegativity: crystal structure and bonding in ionic solids; the metallic state, conduction 
and semiconductors; the preparation and properties of illustrative compounds. 

Mr. Pinkerton 

CH 503 Inorganic Chemistry II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CH 501 

A continuation of CH 501. Topics covered are: the hydrogen molecule-ion and the theory of 
the covalcnt bond; molecular orbitals and hybridization; dipole moments and magnetic 
properties; the theory of acids and bases; non-aqueous solvents; coordination compounds, 
carbonyls and quasi-aromatic compounds; and the chemistry of the transition metals, Ian- 
thanides and actinides. Mr. Long 

CH 511 Chemical Spectroscopy 4 (2-6) f 

Prerequisite: CH 433 

Theory, analytical applications and interpretation of spectra as applied to chemical prob- 
lems. Major emphasis will be placed upon ultraviolet, visible and infrared spectra. 

Mr. Long 

CH 512 (TC 512) Chemistry of High Polymers 



262 The General Catalog 

CH 513 Eleetroonolyticol Chemistry 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: CH 413 

A course in electroanalytical chemistry including the foundations of theoretical electro- 
chemistry. Topics covered are: Potentiometric measurements and electrical resistance; diffu- 
sion, transport; theory of dilute solutions; polarography and amperometric measurements; 
surface effects and electrode kinetics; electrochemistry in non-aqueous systems. 

Mr. Pinkerton 

CH 521 Advonced Orgonie Chemistry I 3 (3-0) f 

Resonance, reaction mechanisms; hydrocarbons, organic halides, alcohols, amines, and carbonyl 
compounds. Mr. Doak 

CH 523 Advonced Organic Chemistry II 3 (3-0) s 

Stereochemistry, steroids and other natural products, organometallics, and heterocycles. 

Mr. Doak 

CH 525 Physical Organic Chemistry 3 (3-0) s 
Prerequisites: CH 223 and CH 433 

Theoretical and physical aspects of organic chemistry; structure and mechanism in organic 

chemistry. Mr. Loeppert 

CH 527 Chemistry of Metal-Orgonic Compounds 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: Three years of chemistry including CH 223 

A study of the preparation, properties and reactions of compounds containing the carbon- 
metal bond, with a brief description of their uses. Mr. Doak 

CH 528 Qualitative Organic Analysis 3 (1-6) f 

Prerequisites: Three years of chemistry including CH 223 

A study of class reactions, functional groups, separation, identification and preparation of 

derivatives. Staff 

CH 529 Quantitative Orgonie Analysis 3 (1-6) s 

Prerequisites: CH 223 and CH 413 

Quantitative determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, the halogens, sulfur and various 
functional groups in organic materials, with emphasis on semimicro methods. 

Staff 

CH 531 Chemical Thermodynamics 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: CH 433 and MA 301 

An extension of elementary principles to the treatment of ideal and real gases, ideal solutions, 
electrolytic solutions, galvanic cells, surface systems, and irreversible processes. An intro- 
duction to statistical thermodynamics and the estimation of thermodynamic functions from 
spectroscopic data. Mr. Sutton 

CH 533 Chemical Kinetics 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: CH 433 and MA 301 

An intensive survey of the basic principles of chemical kinetics with emphasis on experimental 
and mathematical techniques, elements of the kinetic theory, and theory of the transition state. 
Applications to gas reactions, reactions in solution, and mechanism studies. Mr. Bowen 

CH 535 Surface Phenomena 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: CH 433 and MA 301 

An intensive survey of the topics of current interest in surface phenomena. This course 
is designed to cover the foundations of the present understanding of surface behavior. Formu- 
lation of basic theories are presented together with illustrations of their current applica- 
tions. Mr. Getzen 

CH 537 Quantum Chemistry 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: CH 435, PY 401 and PY 407 

The elements of wave mechanics applied to stationary energy states and time dependent 
phenomena. Applications of quantum theory to chemistry, particularly chemical bonds. 

Mr. Coots 



Chemistry 263 

CH 543 Radioisotope Principles 3 (3-0) f 
Prerequisites: CH 433, PY 202 and MA 202 

A presentation of the basic knowledge of radioactivity, nuclear reactions, ionizing radiations, 

and radiochemistry essential to competence in the use of radioisotopes. Mr. Coots 

CH 544 Radioisotope Techniques 1 (0-3) f 
Corequisite: CH 543 

A laboratory course in the physical and chemical techniques essential to competence in the 

use of radioisotopes. Mr. Coots 

CH 545 Radiochemistry 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: CH 543. or PY 407 and PY 410 

An advanced presentation of the applications of radioactivity to chemistry and of the appli- 
cations of chemistry to the radioactive elements, particularly the heavy elements and 
fission products. Mr. Coots 

CH 546 Radiochemistry Laboratory 1 (0-3) s 

Corequisite: CH 545 

The laboratory work associated with CH 545 Radiochemistry. Mr. Coots 

CH 551 General Biological Chemistry 5 (3-6) f 

Prerequisites: 3 years of chemistry including CH 223 

The chemical constitution of living matter. Biochemical processes as well as compounds are 

studied. Mr. Peterson 

CH 553 Chemistry of Proteins and Nucleic Acids 3 (3-0) s 
Prerequisite: CH 551 

Composition, distribution, structure, properties and metabolism of amino adds, proteins and 

nucleic acids. Mr. Armstrong 

CH 555 Plant Chemistry 3 (2-3) s 
Prerequisite: CH 551 

Composition of plants, properties, nature, and classification of plant constituents, changes oc- 

curing during growth, ripening and storage of plant products. Mr. Sisler 

Courses for Graduates Only 

CH 621 (ANS 621) Enzymes and Intermediory Metabolism 4 (3-0) * 

Prerequisite: CH 551 

A study of the properties of enzymes and enzyme action, intermediary metabolism of car- 
bohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, purines and porphrins, metabolic energy 
relationships. Mr. Tove 

CH 622 (ANS 622) Principles of Biological Assays 3 (2-2) s 
Prerequisites: CH 551 or ANS 312 and ST 512 

Techniques and designs of biological assays for vitamins; interrelationships of logical prin- 
ciples, design, and analysis is emphasized. Staff 

CH 631 Chemical Research Credits by arrangements f s 

Prerequisites: Forty semester credits in chemistry. Open to all graduates. 

Special problems that will furnish material for a thesis. A maximum of 6 semester credits is 

allowed toward a master's degree, no limitation on credits in doctorate programs. Staff 

CH 641 Seminar Credits by arrangement f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in chemistry. 

Required of graduate students specializing in chemistry. 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of interest to chemists are 

reviewed and discussed. 

A maximum of two semester credits is allowed toward the master's degree, but any number 

toward the doctorate. Staff 



264 The General Catalog 

CH 651 Special Topics in Chemistry Maximum 3 credits f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in chemistry 

Critical study of some special problems in one of the branches of chemistry involving original 

investigation together with a survey of pertinent literature. Staff 

CH 671 Advanced Physical Chemistry 3 (3-0) ♦ 

Prerequisite: CH 533 

Involves a thorough review of the fundamental principles of physical chemistry with extension 

and application of these to the study of solid state. Mr. Sutton 

CH 672 Advanced Physical Chemistry 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CH 671 

There will be laid down the elements of statistical mechanics and kinetic theory, in terms 

of which certain topics from CH 671 will be more exhaustively developed. Mr. Sutton 



Civil Engineering 

Courses for Undergraduates 

CE 201 Surveying I 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 101 

Required of sophomores in Civil Engineering, Civil Engineering Construction Option, Forestry, 

and juniors in Geological Engineering 

Elements of plane surveying; taping, transit, level, stadia, plane table, topograpic surveying 

and mapping, care and adjustment of instruments; public land surveys. 

CE 202 Surveying II 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 201 

Required of sophomores in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Construction surveys; earthwork computations, route surveys, simple, compound, parabolic 
and special curves; elementary astronomical surveying. 

CE 305, 306 Transportotion Engineering I, II 3 (2-2) f t 

Prerequisite: CE 202 

Transporation systems; elements of railroad, highway, traffic and airport engineering; physical 

and mechanical properties of soil that govern their use as engineering materials. 

CE 321 Materials Testing Laboratory I 2 (1-3) f t 

Prerequisite: EM 200 

Physical properties of aggregates. Manufacture and chemical properties of cementing agents. 
Physical properties of wet and hardened concretes; design and proportioning of concrete 
mixes; tensile, compressive, and flexural properties of plain and reinforced concrete. 

CE 322 Materials Testing Laboratory II 2 (1-3) f s 

Corequisite: EM 301 

Properties of clay and cement raasonary units. Growth, structure and mechanical properties 
of various species of wood. Production and mechanical properties of structural metals; elastic 
and plastic tensile properties of steel. Test of riveted and welded joints. 

CE 324 Structural Analysis I 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: EM 200; Corequisite: EM 301 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Stress analysis of statically determinate beams and framed structures under fixed and moving 
loads; influence line treatment for moving loads; analysis and design of a simple truss. 



Civil Engineering 265 

CE 338 Structures I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: EM 200 

Required of juniors in Architecture 

Analysis of simple structures, reactions, shear and moment diagrams; stresses in numbers of 

framed structures; graphic statics. 

CE 339 Structures II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: CE 338 and EM 301 

Required of juniors in Architecture 

Analysis of indeterminate structures; slopes and deflections; analysis of indeterminate frames 

by moment distribution. 

CE 361 Estimates and Costs I 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Interpretation of working drawings; analysis of construction plans and specifications; approxi- 
mate and detailed estimates of costs. 

CE 362 Estimates and Costs II 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 361 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Preparation of complete costs estimates of construction projects; bidding procedures and 

preparation of bids. 

CE 382 Hydraulics 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 200 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering 

Properties of fluids and mechanics of fluid flow in pipes and open channels; theory of design 

and characteristics of pumps and hydraulic motors; measurement of fluid flow. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

CE 425 Structural Analysis It 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: CE 324 and EM 301 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 

Deflection of beams and trusses; indeterminate stress analysis by moment area, slope deflection 

and moment distribution. 

CE 427 Structurol Design I 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisites: EM 301 and CE 324 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Analysis and design of reinforced concrete building elements; design of tension, compression 
and simple flexural members of steel and of timber. 

CE 428 Structural Design II 3 (1-6) s 

Prerequisites: CE 427 and CE 425 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 

Design specifications; connection details; independent and complete design of engineering 

structures. 

CE 429 Structural Design III 3 (2-3) « 

Prerequisite: CE 427 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Design of tension, compression and flexural elements of steel and timber; solution of problems 

in erection, forms, shoring and falsework. 

CE 442 Soil Mechanics 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: CE 305 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 

Fundamental stress relations, Mohr's rupture hypothesis, shearing strength, earth pressure 

theories, bearing capacity, stability of slopes, hydrostatics, and hydrodynamics of ground water. 



266 The General Catalog 

CE 443 Foundations 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CE 427 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Identification and classification of soils; geological aspects of foundation engineering; method 

of investigating subsoil conditions; control of water; type of foundations and conditions 

favoring their use; legal concepts of foundation engineering. 

CE 461 Project Planning and Control I 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: CE 362 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Analysis of construction plant layout requirements and performance characteristics of equipment. 

CE 462 Project Planning and Control II 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 461 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Scheduling, analysis and control of construction projects. 

CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option, elective 

Legal aspects of construction contract documents and specifications; owner-engineering-con- 
tractor relationships and responsibilities; bids and contract performance; labor laws. 

CE 481 Hydrology and Drainage 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisite: CE 382 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 

Occurrence and distribution of rainfall; runoff, surface and ground waters; design of drainage 

and control structures. 

CE 482 Water and Sewage Works 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 
Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 

Water supply analysis and design, including population estimates, consumption, source selec- 
tion aqueducts, distribution systems and pumping stations; elements of water treatment; col- 
lection and disposal of sewage; elements of sewage treatment. 

CE 485 Elements of Hydraulics and Hydrology 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: EM 200 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering and Construction Option 

Elements of fluid mechanics, hydraulics and hydrology, with application to problems in con- 
struction engineering. 

CE 492, 493 Professional Practice I, II 1 (1-0) f t 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Professional engineering societies and their functions; professional standards; topics of cur- 
rent interest to the civil engineer. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CE 507 Airphoto Analysis I 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Engineering evaluation of aerial photographs, including analysis of soils and surface drainage 

characteristics. 

CE 508 Airphoto Analysis II 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 507 

Engineering evaluation of aerial photographs for highway and airport projects. 



Civil Engineering 267 

CE 509 Photogrammetry 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 201 

Elements of photogrammetry as applied to surveying and mapping. Aerial and terrestrial 
photogrammetry. Flight planning and ground controls. Stereoscopy and stereoscopic plotting 
instruments. Measurements on photographs. 

CE 510 Advanced Surveying 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 202 

State coordinate systems and map projections. Elements of geodetic and astronomical surveying. 
Adjustment of observations by the method of least squares. 

CE 514 Municipal Engineering Projects 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Special problems relating to public works, public utilities, urban planning and city engineering. 

CE 515 Transportation Operations 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CE 306 

The analysis of traffic and transportation engineering operations. 

CE 516 Transportation Design 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: CE 306 

The geometric elements of traffic and transportation engineering design. 

CE 524 Analysis and Design of Masonary Structures 3 (3-0) f 

Corequisite: CE 425 

Analysis and design of arches, culverts, dams, foundations and retaining walls. 

CE 525, 526 Advanced Structural Analysis I, II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Analysis of rigid frames and continuous structures; treatment of redundant members and 
secondary stresses. 

CE 527 Numerical Methods in Structural Analysis 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Newmark's numerical integration procedure and its applications; matrix operations, relaxation 
and iteration, finite difference method. Force and displacement methods, string polygon 
method. High-speed computation. 

CE 531 Experimental Stress Analysis 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Principles and methods of experimental analysis; dimensional analysis; applications to full- 
scale structures. 

CE 532 Structural Laboratory 3 (1-6) s 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Test procedures and limitations and interpretations of experimental results. 

CE 534 Plastic Analysis and Design 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CE 427 

Analysis of steel structure behavior beyond the elastic limit; concept of design for ultimate 
load and the use of load factors. Analysis and design of component parts of frames. Methods 
of predicting strength and deformation behavior of structures loaded in the plastic range. 
Bracing and connection requirements for frames. 

CE 535 Ultimate Strength Theory and Design 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CE 427 

Ultimate strength theories of axially loaded column flexure, combined flexure and axial 
load, shear. Critical review of important research and their relationship with the development 
of modern design codes for reinforced concrete. 



268 The General Catalog 

CE 536 Theory and Design of Prestressed Concrete 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CE 427 

The principles of prestressed concrete. Materials. Methods of prestressing. Loss of prestress. 
Design of beams for bending, shear and bond. Ultimate strength. Deflection. Composite 
beams. Continuous beams. Special topics. Design projects. 

CE 544 FoundoHon Engineering 3 (3-0) f s 

Pierequisitc: CE 442 

Subsoil investigations; excavations: design of sheeting and bracing systems; control of water; 
footing, grillage and pile foundations caisson and cofferdam methods of construction; legal 
aspects of foundation engineering. 

CE 547 Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 301 

Physical and mechanical properties of soils governing their use for engineering purposes; stress 

relations and applications to a variety of fundamental problems. 

CE 548 Engineering Properties of Soils I 3 (2-3) f 

Corequisite: CE 442 

The study of soil properties that are significant in earthwork engineering, including proper- 
ties of soil solids, basic clay mineral concepts, classification, identification, plasticity, perme- 
ability, capillarity and stabilization. Laboratory work includes classification, permeability and 
compaction tests. 

CE 549 Engineering Properties of Soils II 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 548 

Continuation of CE 548, including the study of compressibility, stress-strain relations and 

shear strength theories for soil. Laboratory work includes consolidation and shear strength 

tests. 

CE 570 Sanitary Microbiology 3 (2-3) f s 

(See BO 570) 

CE 571 Theory of Water and Sewage Treatment 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing 

Study of the physical and chemical principles underlying water aiKl sewage treatment pro- 
cesses; diffusion of gases, solubility, equilibrium and ionization, anaerobic and aerobic stabili- 
zation processes, sludge conditioning and disposal. 

CE 572 Unit Operations and Processes in Sanitary Engineering 3 (1-6) s 

Prerequisite: CE 571 

Processes and operations in sanitary engineering; sedimentation, aeration, filtration, adsorption, 
coagulation, softening, sludge digestion, aerobic treatment of sewage. 

CE 573 Analysis of Water and Sewage 3 (1-6) f 

Corequisite: CE 571 

Chemical and Physical analysis of water and sewage and interpretation of results. 

CE 574 Radioactive Waste Disposal 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 410 

Unit operations and processes employed in treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes. 

CE 580 Flow in Open Channels 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 481 

The theory and applications of flow in open channels, including dimensional analysis, mo- 
mentum-energy principle, gradually varied flow, high-velocity flow, energy dissipators, spill- 
ways, waves, channel transition and model studies. 

CE 591, 592 Civil Engineering Seminar 1 (1-0) f S 

Discussion and reports of subjects in civil engineering and allied fields. 



CE 598 Civil Engineering Projects 

Special projects in some phases of civil engineering. 



Civil Engineering 269 
1 to 6 (orrange) f s 



Courses for Graduates Only 



CE 607 Transportation Planning 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 515 

The planning, administration, economics and financing of various transportation engineering 

facilities. 



CE 602 Advanced Transportation Design 

Prerequisite: CE 516 

Design of major traffic and transportation engineering projects. 



3 (2-3) s 



CE 603 Airport Planning and Design 

Prerequisites: CE 515 and 516 

The analysis, planning and design of air transportation facilities. 



3 (2-3) f 



CE 604 Urban Transportotion Planning 

Prerequisite: CE 515 

Thoroughfare planning as related to land usage and urban master-planning. 



3 (2-3) s 



CE 623 Theory and Design of Arches 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: CE 428 and CE 526 

General theory of elastic arches. Boundary conditions and their effect on the behavior of the 
arch. Single span, multiple span arches on elastic piers, influence lines of various functions 
under moving loads, economical layout of arches, design criteria for steel and concrete arches. 

CE 624 Analysis and Design of Structural Shells and Folded Plates 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: CE 623 and EM 511 

Roof structures consisting of surfaces of revolution, both single and compound curved. 

Membrane stresses, bending stresses at boundaries. Domes and cylindrical shells. Approximate 

and exact analyses. Design of criteria. Folded plane structures of concrete plates and steel 

frames. 

CE 625, 626 Advanced Structural Design I, II 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 428; Corequisites: CE 525 and 526 

Complete structural designs of a variety of projects; principles of limit and prestress design. 

CE 627 Design of Blast Resistant Structures 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: CE 526, CE 535 and EM 554 

Sources, intensities, and methods of transmission of dynamic loads. Behavior of structural 
elements under dynamic loadings. Behavior of structural systems subjected to pulse and impact 
loads. Design criteria and factor of safety. Design of surface and underground structures 
for nuclear blasts. 

CE 641, 642 Advanced Soil Mechanics 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 422 or corequisite: CE 547 

Theories of soil mechanics; failure conditions; mechanical interaction between solids and 
water, and problems in elasticity pertaining to earthwork engineering; soil dynamics. 



CE 643 Hydraulics of Ground Water 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 442 or 547 

Principles of ground water hydraulics; theory of flow through idealized porous media; the 
flow net solution; seepage and well problems. 



270 The Gener,\l Catalog 

CE 671 Advanced Water Supply and Sewerage 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: CE 482 

Problems relating to the design of water supply and sewerage works. 

CE 672 Advanced Water ond Sewoge Treatment 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 482 

Problems relating to the treatment of water and sewage. 

CE 673 Industrial Woter Supply and Waste Disposal 3 (3-0) f s 

Corequisite: CE 571 

Water requirements of industry and the disposal of industrial wastes. 

CE 674 Stream Sanitation 3 (3-0) f s 

Corequisite: CE 571 

Biological, chemical and hydrological factors that affect stream sanitation and stream use. 

CE 698 Civil Engineering Research 1-6 (arrange) f s 

Independent investigation of an advanced dvil engineering problem; a report of such an in- 
vestigation is required as a graduate thesis. 



Crop Science 



Courses for Undergraduates 

CS 211 Field Crops 1 3 (2-2) f s 
Prerequisite: BO 103 

Discussion of fundamental principles underlying crop production. The application of these 

principles to the major and minor field crops. The elements of plant identification, crop 

grading and judging. Mr. Lewis 

CS 311 Field Crops II 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisites: CS 211, SSC 2(X) 

Specific problems in field crop production other than forage crops. Discussion of those crops 
in farm rotations brings together all the major aspects of crop production for different 
climatic areas. Mr. Lewis 

CS 312 Pastures and Forage Crops 3 (3-0) s 
Prerequisites: CS 211, SSC 200 recommended 

A study of the production and preservation of the principal forage crops. Special attention 

is given to the development and maintenance of pastures. Mr. Chamblee 

CS 412 Advanced Pastures and Forage Crops 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: CS 312 

Pasture species and management (cultural treatment) from an international viewpoint, and 
the inter-relationship of grazing animals on pasture development and management will be 
emphasized. Natural giassland and the place of special plant species will be considered. 

Mr. Gross 

CS 413 Plant Breeding 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

The application of genetic principles to the improvement of economic plants, including dis- 
cussions of the methods employed in the development and the perpetuation of desirable 
clones, varieties and hybrids. Mr. Harvey 

CS 414 Weeds and Their Control 3 (2-2) i 

Prerequisites: CS 211, CH 203 or equivalent 

Principles involved in cultural and chemical weed control. Discussions on chemistry of 
herbicides and the effects of the chemicals on the plant. Identification of common weeds and 
their seeds is given. Mr. Klingman 



Design 271 
Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

CS 511 Tobacco Technology 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisites: CS 311, BO 421 or equivalent 

A study of special problems concerned with the tobacco crop. The latest research problems 

and findings dealing with this important cash crop will be discussed. 

Mr. Jones 

CS 521 Special Problems Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Students admitted only with consent of instructor 

Special problems in various phases in Crop Science. Problems may be selected or will be 

assigned. Emphasis will be placed on review of recent and current research. 

Graduate Stafif 

CS 541 (GN 541 or HS 541) Plant Breeding Methods 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: GN 512, ST 511 recommended 

An advanced study of methods of plant breeding as related to principles and concepts of 

inheritance. Messrs. Haynes, Timothy 

CS 542 (GN 542 or HS 542) Plont Breeding Field Procedures 2 (0-4) 

(In Summer Session^) 
Prerequisite: CS 541 or GN 541 or HS 541 

A laboratory and field study of the application of the various plant breeding techniques and 
methods used in the improvement of economic plants. Mr, Harvey 

Courses for Graduates Only 

Students are to consult the instructor before registration. 

CS 61 1 Forage Crop Ecology 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisites: CS 412, BO 441 

A study of the effect of environmental factors on the growth of forage crops. Attention will 

be given to methods of research in forage ecology. Mr. Chamblee 

CS 612 Special Topics in Weed Control 2 (2-0) t 

Prerequisites or corequisites: BO 403, BO 532 or 533, CS 414 

Detailed examination of current concepts and literature of weed control. The chemistry, 
physiology, ecology, taxonomy, microbiology, equipment, and techniques used in weed con- 
trol research will be discussed. Graduate StaflE 

CS 631 Seminar 1 (1-0) f t 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of interest to agronomists 
reviewed and discussed. A maximum of two credits is allowed toward the master's degree, 
however, additional credits toward the doctorate are allowed. Graduate Staff 

CS 641 Research Credits by arrongement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the master's degree, but any number toward the 

doctorate. Graduate StaCE 



Design 

Courses for Undergraduates 

DN 101, 102 Design I, II 3 (3-6) f s 

Required of first year students in the School of Design 

Introduction to the elements and expression of two and three dimensional design involving a 
variety of tools, materials, and techniques. Orientation of historical and contemporary concepts 
of art and architecture. 

Messrs. Baron, Bireline, Macomber, Hertzman, Sappenfield, Stuart, Taylor 



272 The General Catalog 

DN m, 112 Descriptive Drawing I, II 2 (0-4) f s 

Required of first year students in the School of Design 

Problems in visual analysis with emphasis on the systems man has devised to describe his 

visual experience. Messrs. Bireline, Cox, Hertzman, Sappenfield, Taylor 

DN 121, 122 Technical Drawing 1, II 3 (2-4) f s 

Required of first year students in the School of Design 

Descriptive geometry and allied technical drawing. Lectures and simple exercises in analytical 

programming of architectural elements. 

Messrs. Boaz, Buisson, Glowczewski, Sappenfield, Shawcroft, Shogren, Thurlow 

DN 211, 212 Descriptive Drawing III, IV 2 (0-4) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 112 

Required of second year students in the School of Design 

Problems continuing the studies begun in freshman year with the addition of the study of 

color and its effects. Messrs. Cox, Hertzman, Macomber, Sappenfield 

DN 311, 312 Advanced Descriptive Drawing I, II 2 (0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 212 

Required of third year students in the School of Design 

Advanced problems in the fields of painting, sculpture, drawing, and graphics. 

Messrs. Bireline, Cox, Stuart 

DN 321, 322 History of Architecture I, II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: HI 245 

Required of all students in Architecture and Landscape Architecture 

A critical study of architecture from prehistoric times to the present including references to 

landscape architecture, painting, sculpture, and artifacts. Mr. Buisson 

DN 411, 412 Advanced Descriptive Drawing III, IV 2 (0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 312 

Required of fourth year students in the School of Design 

Advanced problems in the fields of painting, sculpture, drawing, and graphics. 

Messrs. Bireline, Cox, Stuart 

DN 421, 422 History of Design, I, II 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisite: HI 246 

Required of all students in Architecture and Landscape Architecture 

Specialized historical studies in design fields. 

Messrs. Clarke, Harris 

DN 511, 512 Advanced Descriptive Drawing V, Vi 2 (0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 412 

Required of fifth year students in Landscape Architecture and Product Design 

Advanced problems in the fields of painting, sculpture, drawing, and graphics. 

Messrs. Bireline, Cox, Joslin, Stuart 

DN 541 Seminar on Ideas in Design 2 (2-0) f 

Corequisites: ARC 501, LA 501 or PD 501 

Required of fifth year students in the School of Design 

An introduction to aesthetics and the relationships of philosophic thought to design. 

Mr. Kamphoefner 

Economics 

Courses for Undergraduates 

EC 201, 202 Economics 3 (3-0) f s 

Fundamental principles applying to the organization and functioning of our economy. 



Economics 273 

EC 205 The Economic Process 3 (3-0) f s 

An analysis of the process and principles by which an economy allocates resources, distributes 
goods and income and determines rate of growth. 

EC 301 Production and Prices 3 (3-0) f or s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

An intensive study of the functioning of the market economy. An examination of the role 
of prices in determining the allocation of resources, the functioning of the firm in the eco- 
nomy, and forces governing the production of economic goods. 

EC 302 Notional Income and Economic Welfare 3 (3-0) f or s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

An intensive examination of factors determining the national income. The economic and 
social effects of the level, composition, and distribution of national income will be studied 
with reference to theories of economic welfare and to public policy. 

EC 310 Economics of (he Firm 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

An examination of the economic setting within which the business firm makes decisions, 
and an application of economic analysis to these decisions. Economics from the focal point 
of managerial decision-making. 

EC 312 Accounting for Engineers 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of accounting principles from the management point of view; the analysis, recording 

and interpretation of business data; preparation of financial statesmcnts, their use and 
interpretation. 

EC 315 Salesmanship 2 (2-0) f s 

An introduction to the principles and techniques of selling from the standpoint of the 

individual salesman. A course designed for the technical student anticipating entering the 
field of distribution. 

EC 401, 402 Principles of Accounting 3 (2-2) f s 

Fundamental principles of accounting theory and practice; the analysis and recording of 
business transactions; explanation and interpretation of the structure, forms and use of 
financial statements. 

EC 407 Business Law I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

A course dealing with elementary legal concepts, contracts, agency, negotiable instruments, 
sales of personal property, chattel mortgages, partnerships, corporations, suretyship and bail- 
ments, insurance. 

EC 408 Business Law II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 407 

Deals with real property, mortgages on urban and farm lands, landlord and tenant, require- 
ments for valid deed, insurance law, wills, suretyship, and conditional sales. 

EC 409 Introduction to Production Costs 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 312 

An introduction to accounting for manufacturing, fabrication and construction-type enter- 
prises. The determination and allocation of costs of materials, labor, and overhead. Special 
emphasis is placed on managerial analysis, interpretation, and control of cost data. 

EC 410 Industry Studies 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

An analysis of organization, market structure, and competitive behavior in specific industries, 
using the tools of the economist as a guide to pertinent factors and their significance. The 
course will be organized along the lines of intensive but broadly relevant case-studies. 



274 The General Catalog 

EC 411 Marketing Methods 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

Marketing institutions and their functions and agencies; retailing; market analysis; problems 
in marketing. 

EC 413 Competition, Monopoly, and Public Policy 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. EC 301 recommended but not required 

An analysis of the eflect of modern industrial structure on competitive behavior and per- 
formance, in the light of contemporary price theory and the theory of workable competition, 
A critical evaluation of the legislative content, judicial interpretation, and economic effects 
of the anti- trust laws. 

EC 414 Tax Accounting 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 312 or EC 401 

An analysis of the Federal tax laws relating to the individual and business. Determining and 
reporting income. Payroll taxes and methods of reporting them. Actual practice in the 
preparation of income tax returns. 

EC 420 Corporation Finance 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

Financial instruments and capital structure; procuring funds; managing working capital; 

managing corporate capitalization; financial institutions and their work. 

EC 425 Industriol Management 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Principles and techniques of modern scientific management; relation of finance, marketing, 
industrial relations, accounting, and statistics to production planning and control; analysis of 
economic, political and social influences on production. 

EC 426 Personnel Management 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

The scientific management of manpower, from the viewpoint of the supervisor and the per- 
sonnel specialists. A study of personnel policy and a review of the scientific techniques regard- 
ing the specific problems of employment, training, promotion, transfer, health and safety, 
employee service, and joint relations. 

EC 431 Labor Problems 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

An economic approach to labor problems including wages, hours, working conditions, in- 
security, substandard workers, minority groups, social security, and public policy relative to 
these problems. 

EC 432 Industrial Relations 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Collective bargaining. Analysis of basic labor law and its interpretation by the courts and 
governmental agencies. An examination of specific terms of labor contracts and their impli- 
cations for labor and management. An examination of labor objectives and tactics and man- 
agement objectives and tactics. Problems of operating under the labor contract. 

EC 440 Economics of Growth 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

An examination of the institutional background required for national economic develop- 
ment. The conditions apparent for past growth of nations are compared with conditions ob- 
tained in presently retarded nations. Conclusions are drawn from this comparison to provide 
an introduction to the theoretical models of growth. 

EC 442 Evolution of Economic Ideas 3 (3-0) f or s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

An analysis of the development of economic thought and method during the past two cen- 
turies. Economics considered as a cumulative body of knowledge in a context of emerging 
technology, changing institutions, pressing new problems, and the growth of science. 



Economics 275 

EC 446 Economic Forecasting 3 (3-0) f or ■ 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. EC 302 recommended but not required 

An examination of the basic principles and techniques of economic forecasting with strong 
emphasis upon the economic models upon which forecasting is based. 

EC 448 International Economics 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

A study of international economics, including trade, investment, monetary relations, and 
certain aspects of economic development. Emphasis upon analytical and policy approaches, 
although some institutional material is included. 

EC 450 Economics Decision Processes 3 (3-0) ■ 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205, MA 202 or MA 212 

An analysis of processes for decision making by individuals and groups. Linear programming, 
probability, and game theory in the light of a general theory of decision. 

EC 490 Senior Seminar in Economics 3 (3-0) f ■ 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

The terminal course in undergraduate study of economics. The student is assisted in sum- 
marizing his training, and in improving his capacity to recognize problems and to select 
logically consistent means of solving the problems. This is done on a small-group and individ- 
ual basis. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EC 501 (AGC 501) Intermediate Economic Theory 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: EC 301 or AGC 212 or equivalent 

An intensive analysis of the determination of prices and of market behavior including demand, 
costs and production, pricing under competitive conditions, and pricing under monopoly 
and other imperfectly competitive conditions. 

EC 502 Money, Income, and Employment 3 (3-0) ■ 

Prerequisite: EC 302 or EC 501 or equivalent 

A study of the methods and concepts of national income analysis with particular reference 

to the role of monetary policy in maintaining full employment without inflation. 

EC 510 (PS 510) Public Finance 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

A survey of the theories and practices of governmental taxing, spending, and borrowing, in- 
cluding intergovernmental relationships and administrative practices and problems. 

EC 525 Management Policy and Decision Moking 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: Nine hours in economics and related courses and consent of the instructor 
A review and consideration of modern management processes used in making top-level policies 
and decisions. An evaluation of economic, social and institutional pressures, and of the eco- 
nomic and non-economic motivations, which impinge upon the individual and the organization. 
The problem of coordinating the objectives and the mechanics of management is examined. 

EC 531 Management of Industrial Relations 3 (3-0) ■ 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor 

A seminar course designed to round out the technical student's program. Includes a survey 
of the labor movement organization and structure of unions, labor law and public policy, 
the union contract and bargaining process, and current trends and tendencies in the field 
of collective bargaining. 

EC 541 Origins of the United States' Economy 3 (3-0) ff 

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate standing; EC 205, HI 261, or HI 333, or equivalents 
A seminar on growth and development of American economic institutions. Emphasis is 
placed on the relationship between the growth of the economy of the United States and 
theories of economic development. 



276 The General Catalog 

EC 550 Mathematica! Models in Economics 3 (3-0) f or s 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205, MA 202 or MA 212, EC 450 recommended but not required 
An introductory study of economic models emphasizing their formal properties. The theory 
of individual economic units is presented as a special case in the theory of inductive behavior. 
Mathematical discussions of the theory of the consumer, the theory of the firm, and welfare 
economics will show the relevance of such topics as constrained maxima and minima, set 
theory, partially and simply ordered systems, probability theory, and game theory to economics. 

EC 552 Econometrics 3 (3-0) f or t 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205. MA 202 or MA 212. ST 361 

An analysis of methods for economic inference. Multi-equation economic models: their specifi- 
cation, identification, and estimation. 

EC 555 Linear Programming 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205. MA 202 or MA 212, MA 405 

Recent developments in the theory of production, allocation, and organization. Optimal com- 
bination of integrated productive processes within the firm. Applications in the economics 
of industry and of agriculture. 

EC 590, 591 Seminar in Special Economic Topics 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Topics presented by a visiting professor or special lecturer. This course will be offered from 

time to time as distinguished visiting scholars are available. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

EC 601 Advanced Economic Theory 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: EC 501 or equivalent 

A rigorous examination of contemporary microeconomic theory. 

EC 602 (AGC 602) Monetary and Employment Theory 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 502 or equivalent 

The course consists of an analysis of the forces determining the level of income and employ- 
ment; a review of some of the theories of economic fluctuations; and a critical examination 
of a selected macroeconomic system. 

EC 603 History of Economic Thought 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: EC 442 or EC 501, EC 502 or equivalent 

A systematic analysis of the development and cumulation of economic thought, designed in 
part to provide a sharper focus and more adequate perspective for the understanding of 
contemporary economics. 

EC 605 Reseorch in Economics Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Individual research in economics, under staff supervision and direction. 

EC 640 Theory of Economic Growth 3 (3-0) f « 

Prerequisite: EC 440 or EC 502 or equivalent 

Several theoretical models of economic growth are compared and analyzed. Contemporary 
developments in the theory of national economic growth are studied and evaluated for con- 
sistency with older theories. 

EC 648 Theory of International Trade 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 448 or EC 501 or equivalent 

A consideration, on a seminar basis, of the specialized body of economic theory dealing with 
the international movement of goods, services, capital, and payments. Also, a theoretically- 
oriented consideration of policy. 



Education 277 

EC 650 Economic Decision Theory 3 O-O) f or s 

Prerequisites: EC 501 or equivalent, EC 550 or EC 555 

Study of general theories of choice. Structure of decision problems; the role of information; 

formulation of objectives. Current research problems. 

EC 655 Topics in Mathematical Economics 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EC 501 or equivalent, EC 550 or EC 555 

A seminar and research course devoted to recent literature and developments in mathematical 

economics. 

EC 665 Economic Behavior of the Organization 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisites: EC 501 or equivalent, consent of instructor 

This seminar will apply methods and findings derived from the behavioral sciences to the 
economic behavior of the organization, particularly the business firm. Among the approaches 
which may be utilized are organization theory, information theory, reference group theory, 
and decision theory. 



* Education (General Courses) 

Courses for Undergraduates 

ED 308 Visual Aids 2 (1-2) s 

Methods and techniques of visual instruction; lettering; statistical illustration; chart, graph 
and poster-making; photography; projector operation, care and use. Staff 

ED 344 Secondary Education 2 (1-2) f s 

An overview of secondary education, including development, problems, services, trends, teach- 
ing profession, role of school in the community, purposes and objectives. The development and 
status of secondary education in North Carolina is taken up. Mr. Shannon 

ED 410 Driver Education 3 (2-2) s 

Summer session only 

The principles of teaching basic driving skills, including the new concept of defensive driving, 
observance and interpretation of motor vehicle laws, adverse driving conditions, handling of 
accident situations and care of the car. Mr. Crawford 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ED 501 Education of Exceptional Children 3 (2-2) f 

Discussion of principles and techniques of teaching the exceptional child with major interest 
on the mentally handicapped and slow learner. 

Practice will be given in curriculum instruction for groups of children, individual techniques 
for dealing with retarded children in the average classroom. Opportunity for individual work 
with an exceptional child will be provided. Mr. Corter 

ED 502 Analysis of Reading Abilities 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Education or Psychology 

A study of tests and techniques in determining specific abilities; a study of reading retardation 

and factors underlying reading difficulties. Mr. Rust 

ED 503 Improvement of Reading Abilities 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Education or Psychology 

A study of methods used in developing specific reading skills or in overcoming certain reading 
difficulties; a study of methods used in developing pupil vocabularies and word analysis 
skills; a study of how to control vocabulary burden of reading material. Mr. Rust 



• The departmentol course descriptions in the School of Education follow the general courses. 



278 The General Catalog 

ED 563 Effective Teaching 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education 

Analysis of the teaching-learning process; assumptions that underlie course approaches; identi- 
f)'ing problems of importance; problem solution for effective learning; evaluation of teaching 
and learning; making specific plans for effective teaching. 

Mr. Scarborough 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ED 614 Modern Principles and Practices in Secondary Education 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education 

Foundations of modern programs of secondary education; purposes, curriculum, organization, 
administration, and the place and importance of the high school in the community in rela- 
tion to contemporary social force. Graduate Staff 

ED 615 Introduction to Educational Research 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education 

An introductory course for students preparing for an advanced degree. The purposes are to 
assist the student in understanding the meaning and purpose of educational research and 
the research approach to problems; to develop students' ability to identify educational 
problems, and to plan and carry out research to solve these problems; to aid in the prepara- 
tion of the research report. Special attention is given to tools and methods of research. 
Consideration is also given to the educator as a consumer of research. 

Mr. Chansky 

ED 665 Supervising Student Teaching 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education 

A study of the program of student teaching in teacher education. Special consideration will 
be given the role of the supervising teacher including the following areas: planning for effec- 
tive student teaching, observation and orientation, school community study, analysis of situa- 
tion, evaluating student teachers, and coordination with State College, 

Graduate Staff 



Agricultural Education 

Courses for Undergraduates 

ED 102 Objectives in Agricultural Education 1 (1-0) f 

Designed to help the student understand the purpose of Agricultural Education at State 
College. Also provides an opportunity for students to develop an understanding of purposes 
of vocational agriculture in the school community. Staff 

ED 201 Farming Programs and FFA 2 (2-0) s 

Provides an opportunity for students to get an understanding of the place of farming pro- 
grams and FFA in vocational agriculture, as well as the role of the teacher in these pro- 
grams. Staff 

ED 313 Teaching Rural People 2 (2-0) s 

The purpose of the course is to give the student an understanding of the basic principles 
involved in the teaching-learning process. The course will be built around problem experiences 
of farm people with principles of teaching and learning related to these experiences. 

Staff 

ED 411 Student Teaching in Agriculture 6 (3-12) f 

The first part of the semester (usually six weeks) will be on campus. The remainder of the 
semester will be spent in a high school department of vocational agriculture doing full-time 
student teaching. The student will get experience in all phases of the vocational agriculture 
program, including community study, adult education, home supervision. The student teacher 
will be supervised by the local teacher of agriculture and a member of the staff in Agri- 
cultural Education. Staff 



Agricultural Education 279 

ED 412 Teaching Adults 2 (1-2) f 

Principles of efFective teaching applied to adult and young farmers. Experience in organizing 
and conducting groups for discussion of local problems. Staff 

ED 413 Teaching Materials 2 (1-2) f 

Developing and using teaching materials for more effective instruction. Experience in this 
area with adult and high school classes. Staff 

ED 430 Senior Seminar 1 (1-0) f s 

An analysis on the job of the teacher of vocational agriculture with particular emphasis 
upon current problems. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ED 554 Planning Programs In Agricultural Education 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ED 411 

Consideration of the community as a unit for planning programs in agricultural education; 
objectives and evaluation of community programs; use of advisory groups; school and com- 
munity relationships; organization of the department and use of facilities. 

Messrs. Beam, Scarborough 

ED 558 Special Problems in Teaching Maximum 6 credits 

Prerequisite: ED 411 

Current problems in agricultural education. Opportunities for students to study particular 

problems under the guidance of the staff. Graduate Staff 

ED 568 Adult Education in Agriculture 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ED 411 

This course is designed to meet the needs of teachers as leaders in adult education. More 
emphasis is being given to working with adults as part of the community program of vo- 
cational agriculture. This course will give the teacher an opportunity to study some of the 
basic problems and values in working with adult groups. Particular attention will be given 
to the problem of fitting the educational program for adults into the high school program of 
vocational agriculture, as well as to methods of teaching adults. 

Messrs. Beam, Scarborough 



Courses for Graduates Only 

ED 616 Advanced Problems in Teaching 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ED 558 

Group study in current and advanced problems in the teaching and administration of agri- 
cultural education; evaluation of procedures and consideration for improving. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 617 Philosophy of Agricultural Education 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ED 554 

An examination of current educational philosophies and their relation to agricultural educa- 
tion. Principles and practices involved in the leadership of a teacher of agriculture and in 
making his work effective in a rural community. Study of leaders in the field. 

Mr. Scarborough 

ED 618 Seminar in Agricultural Education Maximum 2 credits 

A critical review of current problems, articles, and books of interest to students of agricultural 
education. Graduate Staff 

ED 621 Research in Agricultural Education Maximum 6 credits 

Individual direction in research on a specific problem of concern to the student. Generally, 
the student is preparing his thesis or research problem. Graduate Staff 



280 The General Catalog 

ED 664 Supervision in Agriculturol Education 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ED 563 

Organization, administration, evaluation and possible improvement of present supervisory 
practice; theory, principles and techniques of effective supervision in agricultural education 
at different levels. 



Industrial Arts 

Courses for Undergraduates 

lA 100 Introduction to Industrial Arts 1 H-O) f 

A basic course designed to orient the student to college life and to introduce him to the 
philosophy, objectives, and scope of industrial arts as related to teacher education and 
industrial employment. A study of the problems and opportunities in the profession. 

Staff 

lA 103 Drafting 1 . , ^. .. ^ • ^u ^ i^'^^ * 

Graphical communication encompassing sketching and instrument drawing. Theory and prac- 
tice taught through the medium of freehand sketching involving oblique, isometric, perspec- 
tive, exploded, assembly, sections, and orthographic projection type drawings. The last 
portion of the course is devoted to instrument drawing, Mr. Troxler 

lA 104 Drafting II 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisite: lA 103 

A study of house planning and construction. Investigation of the factors to be considered by 
the consumer in building or buying a house including location, building codes, FHA require- 
ments, heating and ventilation, construction details, materials of construction. Laboratory 
work includes the design and drawing of a set of house plans. Mr. Troxler 

lA 107 Woods! . ^ . ., r ^ . -u u ^ ^ \^'^^ i 

This course is an introduction to the basic problems of production with hand tools and 

machines. Group and individual problem solving in product design, selection of materials, 

organization of personnel, and laboratory facilities enable students to participate in a variety 

of experiences. Mr. Briley 

lA 108 Woods II 3 (1-4) t 

Prerequisite: lA 107 

This is an advanced course which seeks to develop the students' knowledge and creative 
ability in solving problems using wood and related materials as the media. An opportunity 
will be provided to solve tooling problems as well as increase the individual's proficiency 
with hand and power tools. Mr. Briley 

lA 203 Technical Sketching 2 (1-2) s 

Required of students in Wild Life and Furniture Manufacturing 

The application of drawing practices for the layman. Freehand sketching and instrument 
drawing, lettering, pictorial representation, production sketches, template drawing, exploded 
views, shades and shadows. Individual problems and selected graphic representation. 

Mr. Troxler 

lA 205 Industrial Arts Design 2 (1-2) f 

Prerequisites: lA 104, lA 107, lA 206 

A study of design as related to industry and the industrial arts laboratory. Creative design 
and individual expression through problems involving the utilization of industrial materials, 

Mr. Troxler 

I A 206 Metol Processing I 3 (1-4) f 

Fundamentals of metalwork. Hand and machine tool applications. Emphasis on layout, orien- 
tation to the lathe, milling machine, shaper, surface grinder, and cut-off operations. Experi- 
ences in bench metal and welding. Study of mass production problems through group 
experience. Mr. Moeller 



Industrial Arts 281 

lA 207 Metal Processing II 3 (1-4) • 

Prerequisite: lA 206 

Fundamentals of foundry and sheet metal in conjunction with experiences of some precision 
using engine lathe, shaper, milling machine, and surface grinder. Analysis of metal problems 
in terms of principle applications and machine scheduling. Mr. Moeller 

lA 215 Sheet Metal 1 (0-2) f 

A course designed to provide practical experience in the use of tools, materials and processes 
involved in basic sheet metal fabrication. Mr. Moeller 

lA 304 General Shop Organization 2 (1-2) ■ 

Prerequisites: lA 104. lA 108. lA 207, lA S07 

Application of principles of industrial processes to general shop organization and operation. 
Analysis of products. Methods, techniques of production of laboratory projects including a 
variety of materials suitable to varying educational levels. Mr. Troxler 

lA 306 Graphic Arts 3 (1-4) s 

This course is an introduction to the basic printing areas of letterpress, offset, photo-printing, 
silkscreen, and bookbinding. Students will be given the opportunity to develop materials for 
course outlines which may be used when teaching in the secondary schools. 

Mr. Briley 

lA 307 Basic Electricity 3 (1-4) f 

Prerequisites: PY 211, PY 212 

The fundamentals of electricity as applied to resistive, inductive, capacitive and magnetic 
circuits. Emphasis are upon applications of electrical principles to light and power circuits, 
automobile circuits, motors, and controls. Mr. Young 

lA 308 Basic Electronics 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisite: lA 307 

The fundamentals of electronics as applied to power supply, amplifier and oscillator circuits. 

Applications of electronic principles as found in the super-hetrodyne radio are studied. 

Mr. Young 

lA 314 Recreational Arts and Crafts 2 (1-2) ■ 

Required of juniors in Industrial and Rural Recreation; elective for others 
A course designed to give students interested in recreation work an understanding of and 
experiences in different types of arts and crafts. Emphasis will be given to a wide variety of 
crafts as adaptable to camps, city, industrial and institutional programs. Mr. Briley 

lA 315 General Ceramics 3 (1-4) f • 

This course is designed to give the student an opportunity to work with ceramic materials 
as a medium of expression and to get experience in the basic manufacturing processes of the 
ceramic industry. Emphasis will be given to a study of the sources of clay, designing, forming, 
decorating and firing of ceramic products. Mr. Hosteller 

lA 321 Metalwork Technology 2 (1-2) f ■ 

Prerequisites: lA 206, lA 207 or equivalent 

Applications of principles of industrial techniques and processes to the development and 
construction of products and equipment utilizing a variety of industrial materials. Emphasis 
will be given to research, problem investigation related to design, function and production 
procedures. Mr. Moeller 

ED 422 Methods of Teaching Industrial Subjects 4(4-0) • 

Prerequisites: ED 344. PSY 304 

A study of effective methods and techniques of teaching industrial subjects. Emphasis is 
given to class organization; student-teacher planning; methods of teaching manipulative skills 
and related information; lesson planning; shop safety; and evaluation. Teaching problems 
will be studied and analyzed following directed observations in the public schools. 

Mr. Hostetler 



282 The General Catalog 

ED 444 Student Teaching in Industrial Subjects 6 (2-15) f 

Prerequisite: ED 422 

Students in the Industrial Arts and Industrial Education curricula will devote ten weeks 
during the fall semester to full time, off-campus student teaching in selected public schools 
throughout the State. They will be assigned to their teaching center in the preceding spring 
and will report to their supervising teachers when the public schools (to which they are 
assigned) open in the fall. During the remainder of the term, additional courses will be 
taken in concentrated form. Staff 

lA 465 independent Study in Industrial Arts 6 f 

A course designed to develop problem-solving ability through research activities in industrial 
arts. Problems in industrial arts curriculum, method and content are carefully selected, 
designs or plans of action are prepared, and final papers are presented and defended before 
a faculty committee. Staff 

lA 480 Modern Industries 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

An overview of the function and organization of modern industry. Principles of work simpli- 
fication, motion economy, processing, and scheduling are reviewed. The effects of technologi- 
cal change on labor, management, and consumer are considered. Attention will be focused on 
contributions of technology to specific industrial processes in machining, forming, fabricating 
in relationship to principles, types of equipment and usage areas. Mr. Young 

ED 482 Curriculum Problems in Industrial Arts 2 (1-2) f 

Prerequisites: PSY 304 or six credits in Education 

Approximately one-third of the course is directed to developing a working philosophy of 
industrial arts and the major portion of the course is devoted to planning and organizing 
learning units in industrial arts. Staff 

ED 483 Instructional Aids and Devices 2 (1-2) f 

Prerequisites: PSY 304 or six credits in Education 

Analysis of learning units and the preparation of instructional aids and devices. 

Staff 

lA 484 School Shop Planning and Equipment Selection 3 (3-0) s 

A course for advanced undergraduate students 

The physical planning of school shops and laboratories; selection of tools and equipment. 
Whenever possible, actual or contemplated school buildings will be used for class work. 

Mr. Hostetler 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

lA 510 Design for Industrial Arts Teachers 3 (1-4) 

Prerequisites: Six hours of drawing and lA 205 or equivalent 

A study of new developments in the field of design with emphasis on the relationship of 

material and form in the selection and designing of industrial arts projects. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 552 Industrial Arts in the Elementary School 3 (Summer session) 

Prerequisites: Twelve credits in Education and consent of instructor 

This course is organized to help elementary teachers and principals understand how tools 
and materials and industrial processes may be used to vitalize and supplement the elementary 
school children's experiences. Practical children's projects along with the building of class- 
room equipment. Mr. Hostetler 

I A 560 (ED 560) New Developments in Industrial Arts Education. 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours in Education and teaching experience 

This course is a study of the new developments in industrial arts education. It is designed 
to assist teachers and administrators in developing new concepts and new content based 
on the changes in technology. They will be required to re-evaluate their programs in the 
light of these new concepts and the new content. Mr. Hostetler 



Industrial Education 283 

lA 570 Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts A maximum of 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, permission of instructor 

Courses based on individual problems and designed to give advanced majors in industrial 
arts education the opportunity to broaden or intensify their knowledge and abilities through 
investigation and research in the various fields of industrial arts, such as metals, plastics, or 
ceramics. Graduate Staff 

lA 575 Special Problems in Industrial Arts A maximum of 6 credits 

Prerequisite: One term of student teaching or equivalent 

The puropse of these courses is to broaden the subject matter experiences in the areas of 
industrial arts. Problems involving experimentation, investigation and research in one or 
more industrial arts areas will be required. Graduate Staff 

lA 595 (ED 595) Industrial Arts Workshop 3 (Summer session) 

Prerequisite: One or more years of teaching experience 

A course for experienced teachers, administrators, and supervisors of industrial arts. The 
primary purpose will be to develop sound principles and practices for initiating, conducting 
and evaluating programs in this field. Enrollees will pool their knowledge and practical 
experiences and will do intensive research work on individual and group programs. 

Graduate Staff 



Courses for Graduates Only 

ED 619 Seminar in Industrial Arts Education 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Presentation of current literature in the field of Industrial Arts Education; review and dis- 
cussion of student papers and research problems. Mr. Hostetler 

ED 624 Research in Industrial Arts Education Maximum 6 credits f s 

Prerequisites: Eighteen credits in Education, permission of instructor 

The student will be guided in the selection of one or more research problems and in the 
organization of the problems, methods of gathering data, procedure for analyzing data, and 
the best practice for interpreting and reporting data. Mr. Hostetler 

ED 630 Philosophy of Industrial Arts 2 (2-0) f « 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education 

Required of all graduate students in Industrial Arts Education. Current and historical develop- 
ments in industrial arts; philosophical concepts, function, scope, criteria for the selection 
and evaluation of learning experiences, laboratory organization, student personnel programs, 
community relationships, teacher qualifications, and problems confronting the industrial arts 
profession. Mr. Hostetler 

ED 635 Administration and Supervision of Industrial Arts 2 (2-0) f t 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education 

A study of the problems and techniques of administration and supervision in the improve- 
ment of industrial arts in the public schools. Selection of teachers and their improvements 
in service and methods of evaluating industrial arts programs. Mr. Hostetler 



Industrial Education 

Courses for Undergraduates 

ED 100 Introduction to Industrial Education 2 (2-0) f 

The place of vocational education in a program of public education and the fundamental 
principles upon which this work is based. Mr. Gehres 



284 The General Catalog 

ED 305 Analysis of Technical Education Programs and Course Construction 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ED 100 and advanced undergraduate standing 

Principles and Techniques of selecting and analyzing suitable teaching activities and arrang- 
ing such material into a functional instructional order. Instructional units prepared will be 
based on an analysis of a technical occupation or activity. A detailed course of study will be 
prepared. Mr. Gehres 

ED 327 History and Philosophy of Industrial-Technical Education 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ED 100 

Historical study of trade and technical education movement. Place function and changing 
concepts of industrial and technical education in American education. Economic, sociological 
and psychological aspects. Mr. Hanson 

ED 405 Industrial and Technicol Education Shop and Laboratory Planning 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and 6 hours of drawing or design 

Principles and techniques to assist teachers in planning and organizing shop and laboratory 
facilities. Problems of locating and equipping vocational schools; the planning and layout 
of shops and related technology laboratories and classrooms. Individual and group assign- 
ments on planning and layout of post secondary school buildings. Mr. Gehres 

ED 422 Methods of Teaching Industrial Subjects 4 (4-0) s 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304 

A study of effective methods and techniques of teaching industrial subjects. Emphasis is given 
to class organization; student-teacher planning; methods of teaching manipulative skills and 
related information; lesson planning; shop safety; and evaluation. Teaching problema will 
be studied and analyzed following directed observation in the public schools. 

Staff 

ED 440 Vocational Education 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304 

A comprehensive study of the types of vocational education of less than college grade, pro- 
vided for through Federal legislation; an evaluation of the effectiveness of the program; and 
a detailed study of the North Carolina Plan. Staff 

ED 444 Student Teaching In Industrial Subjects 6 (2-15) f 

Prerequisite: ED 422 

Student in the Industrial Arts and Industrial Education curricula will devote ten weeks during 
the fall semester to full time, off-campus student teaching in selected public schools through- 
out the State. They will be assigned to their teaching center in the preceding spring and will 
report to their supervising teachers when the public schools (to which they are assigned) 
open in the fall. During the remainder of the term, additional courses will be taken in 
concentrated form. Staff 

ED 483 Instructional Aids and Devices 2 (1-2) f 

(See page 278 for description) 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ED 516 Contmunity Occupational Surveys 2 (2-0) t 

Prerequisites: Six credits in Education and consent of instructor. 

Methods in organizing and conducting local surveys and evaluation of findings in planning 

a program of vocational education. Graduate Staff 

ED 521 Organization of Related Study Materials 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ED 422 

The principles of selecting and organizing both technical and general related instructional 

material for trade extension and industrial cooperative training classes. 

Graduate Staff 



Industrial Education 285 

ED 525 Trade Analysis and Course Construction 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites; ED 344. PSY 304 

Principles and practices in analyzing occupations for the purpose of determining teaching 
content. Practice in the principles underlying industrial course organization based on occu- 
pational analysis covering instruction in skills and technology and including course outlines, 
job sequences, the development of industrial materials and instructional schedules. 

Graduate StaS 

ED 527 Philosophy of Industrial and Technical Education 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ED 422, 440 

A presentation of the historical development of industrial and technical education; the types 
of programs, philosophy, trends and problems of vocational-industrial education; study of 
Federal and State legislation pertaining to industrial education, practical nurse education and 
technical education. Mr. Hanson 

ED 528 Principles and Practices in Industrial Cooperative Training 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ED 422, 440 

A study of the developments, the objectives, and principles of industrial cooperative training. 
The organization, promotion and management of programs in this area of vocational education. 

Graduate StaS 

ED 529 Curriculum Materials Development 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ED 525 

Selection and organization of curricula used in vocational-industrial and technical education; 

development of curricula and instructional materials. Mr. Hanson 

ED 591 Special Problems in Industrial Education Maximum 6 

Prerequisites: Six hours of graduate credit and permission of department head 

Directed study to provide individualized study and analysis in specialized areas of trade, 

industrial or technical subjects. Graduate Staff 



Courses for Graduates Only 

ED 609 Planning and Organizing Technical Education Programs 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PSY 304, ED 344. 420, 440, and 516 

Principles of planning and organizing technical education programs sponsored by federal vo- 
cational acts. Professional course for coordinators and directors, with emphasis on the organi- 
zation of post high school technical education level. Survey of needs, building plans, equipping 
and maintenance of buildings, financial structure, and personnel organization and manage- 
ment. Mr. Hanson 

ED 610 Administration and Supervision of Vocational Education 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PSY 304. ED 344, 420, 440 or equivalent 

Administrative and supervisory problems of vocational education; practices and policies of 
Federal and State offices; organization and administration of city and consolidated systems. 

Mr. Hanson 

ED 626 Seminar in Industrial Education Maximum 2 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor 

Reviews and reports on topics of special interest to graduate students in Industrial Educa- 
tion. The course will be offered from time to time in accordance with the availability of 
distinguished professors. Mr. Hanson 

ED 627 Research in Industrial Education Maximum 6 

Prerequisites: Eighteen credits in Education and permission of instructor 

The student will be guided in the selection of one or more research problems and in the 
organization of the problems, methods of gathering data, procedure for analyzing data, and 
best practice for interpreting and reporting data. Graduate Staff 



286 The General Catalog 

Mathematics and Science Education 

Courses for Undergraduates 

ED 203 Introduction to Teaching Mathematics and Science 2 (2-0) s 

A course designed to aid prospective teachers in becoming familiar with the scope and pur- 
poses of secondary education, the qualification and responsibilities of teachers, the relation of 
the school to the community, and current problems of secondary school teachers. 

Mr. Speece 

ED 470 Methods of Teaching Mathematics 3 (3-0) f 

A study of the purposes, methods, materials, curricula and evaluation practices appropriate 
for teachers of mathematics at the secondary level. Mr. Speece 

ED 471 Student Teaching in Mothematics 6 (2-15) f s 

This course is intended to provide the prospective teacher with an opportunity to get experi- 
ence in the skills and techniques involved in teaching mathematics. Each student during 
the senior year will spend 10 weeks off-campus in a selected center. In addition to acquiring 
the necessary competencies for teaching mathematics, the student teachers will also have 
an opportunity to become familiar with the total school program and to participate in as 
many community activities as time will permit during the period of student teaching. 

Mr. Speece 

ED 472 Developing and Selecting Teaching Materials in Mathematics 2 (2-0) f s 

Developing and selecting teaching materials in keeping with the new and changing concepts 
of the content and emphasis in high school mathematics is essential for mathematics teachers. 
The course will follow the class discussion and demonstration pattern. Students will study 
the latest instructional materials and discover or devise materials and aids for increasing 
the effectiveness of the content and instruction in high school mathematics. 

Mr. Speece 

ED 475 Methods of Teaching Science 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the purposes, methods, materials, curricula and evaluation practices appropriate 
for teachers of physical and natural science at the secondary level. Mr. Shannon 

ED 476 Student Teaching in Science , 6 (2-15) f s 

This course is intended to provide the prospective teacher with an opportunity to get ex- 
perience in the skills and techniques involved in teaching science. Each student during the 
senior year will spend 10 weeks off-campus in a selected center. In addition to acquiring the 
necessary competencies for teaching science, the student teacher will also have an opportunity 
to become familiar with the total school program and to participate in as many community 
activities as time will permit during the period of student teaching. Mr. Shannon 

ED 477 Developing and Selecting Teaching Materials in Science 2 (2-0) f t 

Developing and selecting teaching materials in keeping with the new and changing concepts 
of the content and emphasis in high school science, particularly the experimental and labora- 
tory approach to science teaching. Students will study the latest effectiveness of the content and 
instruction in high school science courses. Mr. Shannon 

Occupational Information and Guidance 

Course for Undergraduates 

ED 420 Principles of Guidance 2 (2-0) f s 

This is a course designed to provide basic principles of guidance for teachers, teacher-coun- 
selors, administrators, and others in the school, as well as workers in other areas such as 
the community agency, business, industry, group work, and the like. 

Among the topics covered are need for guidance, bases of guidance services; programs of 
studying the individual; counseling for educational, vocational, social, and personal prob- 
lems; group procedures in guidance. Emphasis is on the practical application of guidance 
principles and procedures. Mr. Morehead 



Occupational Information and Guidance 287 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ED 520 Personnel and Guidance Services 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 6 hours of Education or Psychology 
An introduction to the philosophies, theories, principles and practices of guidance and per- 
sonnel services. Mr. Morehead 

ED 524 Occupational Information 3 (0-3) 

Prerequisites: Six hours of Education or Psychology, ED 420 or equivalent 

This course is designed to prepare teachers, counselors, business and industrial personnel 
workers, placement workers, and others to collect, evaluate, and use occupational and educa- 
tional information. In addition to the study of the usual sources and types of published 
occupational information, attention will be given to collection of occupational information 
locally, preparation of the occupational monograph, analysis of job requirements and worker 
characteristics, occupational trends and factors affecting trends, occupational and industrial 
structure and classification, and the like. Imparting occupational information to groups and 
individuals by techniques such as the following are considered: the occupations unit in 
social studies and other courses, the occupations course, home-room activities, introducing 
occupational information informally in subject matter courses, the resource file, vocational 
counseling. Mr. Morehead 

ED 530 Group Guidance 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: Six hours of Education or Psychology, ED 420 or equivalent 

This course is designed to help teachers, counselors, administrators, and others who work 
with groups or who are responsible for group guidance activities, to understand the theory 
and principles of effective group work, to develop skill in using specific guidance techniques, 
and to plan and organize group activities in the secondary school and other institutions. The 
relationship of group activities to counseling and other aspects of guidance services is con- 
sidered. Methods of evaluating and improving group guidance activities are taken up. 

Mr. Morehead 

ED 533 Organization and Administration of Guidance Services 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, ED 420 or equivalent 

This course is designed for school guidance workers and those preparing for this field. Basic 
principles and current practices employed in developing, organizing, administering, and sup- 
ervising guidance services in the elementary and secondary school will be studied. Inter- 
relationship of guidance services with instruction, administrative relationships, utilization of 
school staff, and evaluation of guidance services will be considered. Mr. Morehead 

ED 590 Individual Problems in Guidance A maximum of 6 credits 

Prerequisite: Six hours graduate work in department or equivalent 

Intended for individual or group studies of one or more of the major problems in guidance 
and personnel work. Problems will be selected to meet the interests of individuals. The 
workshop procedure will be used whereby special projects and reports will be developed by 
individuals and by groups. Messrs. Anderson, Morehead 



Courses for Graduates Only 

ED 631 Educational and Vocational Guidance 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: Nine hours from following fields— Economics, Education, Psychology or Sociology 
This course aims to provide training for teachers who are part-time or full-time counselors, 
employment interviewers, social workers and personnel workers, who are aiding individuals 
with vocational adjustment problems. The course will cover the functions preformed in 
vocational and educational guidance such as assembling and imparting occupational infor- 
mation, counseling regarding vocational and educational plans, the use of aptitude tests, 
placement in jobs and follow-up, and procedures in setting up services of vocational and 
educational guidance in schools, employment offices, and social service agencies. 

Mr. Anderson 



288 The General Catalog 

ED 633 Techniques in Guidance and Personnel 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: Nine hours from following fields-Economics, Education, Psychology or Sociology 
This course is designed to aid personnel workers in secondary schools, colleges, employment 
offices, and social agencies to develop an understanding and to develop skill in using various 
guidance and personnel techniques. Some of the techniques to be studied intensively are: 
anecdotal reports, rating scales, observation, records and reports, sociograms, interviewing, 
counseling and case study procedures. Students will become acquainted with these techniques 
through lectures, demonstrations, and the study of case histories. Attention will be given to 
both diagnosis and treatment. Mr. Anderson 

ED 641 Field Work in Occupational Information and Guidance 2 to 6 f s 

Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing 

A practicum course in which the student undertakes field work in secondary schools, colleges, 
social service agencies, employment office, and industrial establishments which carry on 
guidance and personnel work. The student may observe and participate in some personnel 
service and may study the organization and administration of the programs. 

Messrs. Anderson, Morehead 

ED 651 Research in Occupational Information and Guidance Maximum 6 credits f s 

Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing 

Qualified students will conduct investigations and research in guidance and personnel. Pub- 
lished reports and techniques in investigation will be analyzed and evaluated. 

Messrs. Anderson, Morehead 

Psychology 

Courses for Undergraduates 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the general characteristics of human behavior, including motivation, learning, 
development, emotion, thinking, perception and sensation, and measurement. The objectives 
are development of the ability to communicate in oral and written form accurately and 
scientifically about behavior; development of an understanding of a capacity to use scientific 
ideas and processes as they apply to behavior; an understanding of the behavior of organisms. 

Staff 

PSY 201 Experimental Analysis of Behavior 3 (2-3) f t 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

The objectives of this course are to promote the learning of facts and principles derived 
from an experimental analysis of behavior; to promote familiarity with laboratory operations 
used in studying behavior; to foster capability to write and speak effectively about behavior. 
Topics covered include: acquisition, extinction, spontaneous recovery, generalization, differ- 
entiation, secondary reinforcement, chaining. Messrs. Barkley, Cook, Newman 

PSY 302 Psychology of Personality and Adjustment 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PSY iiOO 

A study of the factors involved in the development of the normal personality, emphasizing 
the principal factors controlling human behavior and their relationship to adjustment 
mechanisms. Mr. Corter 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

A study of learning and evaluation in the context of educational practice. 

Mr. Johnson 

PSY 337 Industrial Psychology I 3 (3-0) f f 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

The application of psychological principles to the problems of industry and business; work 
methods, fatigue, motivation and morale, job analysis, performance measurement. 

Mr. Drewes 



Psychology 289 
Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

PSY 438 Industrial Psychology II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, PSY 337 

The application of psychological principles to the problems of modern industry; with par- 
ticular emphasis on human relations and supervision. Mr. Miller 

PSY 441 Human Factors in Equipment Design 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200, PSY 337 recommended 

Human factors in the design of machines and other equipment. Items of equipment are 
understood as extensions of man's capacity to sense, comprehend, and control his environ- 
ment. Includes problems in the psychology of information, communication, control, and in- 
vention. Messrs. Cook, Drewes 

PSY 464 Visual Perception for Designers 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

The nature of the seeing process and its relation to architecture, industrial arts, and to the 
industrial engineering, and textile design fields. Topics include the basis of sight, perception 
of color and form, vision and illumination, psychological factors in visual design, and a unit 
of training planned to improve the student's ability to perceive visual form. 

Mr. Cook 

PSY 475 Child Psychology 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 304 

The development of the individual child of the elementary school age will be the inclusive 
object of study in this course. Emphasis will be placed upon the intellectual, social, emotional, 
and personality development of the child. Physical growth will be emphasized as necessary to 
an understanding of the psychological development of the pupil. Mr. Barkley 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescence 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

Nature and source of the problems of adolescents in western culture; emotional, social, intel- 
lectual and personality development of adolescents. Messrs. Barkley, Johnson 

PSY 490 Social Psychology 3 (3-0) s 
Prerequisite: PSY 200 

The individual in relation to social factors. Socialization, personality development, communi- 
cation, social conflict and social change. Messrs. Barkley, Miller 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

PSY 501 Experimental Psychology 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: Nine hours of Psychology 

Experimental study of problems in general and theoretical psychology with particular em- 
phasis on sensation and perception. Particular attention is paid to problem formulation, 
experimental design and experimental method. EflFective written and oral performance by the 
student is a basic objective. Messrs. Barkley, Cook, Newman 

PSY 502 Physiological Psychology 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours of Psychology, including PSY 200, PSY 201 

A survey of the physiological bases of behavior including the study of coordination, sensory 
processes, brain functions, emotions, and motivation. Mr. Bernard 

PSY 504 Advanced Educational Psychology 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Psychology 

A critical appraisal of current psychological findings that are relevant to educational practice 

and theory. Mr. Johnson 



290 The General Catalog 

PSY 511 Advanced Social Psychology 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PSY 200 and 514, additional hours in Psychology 

A study of social relationships and their psychological bases; emphasis on those aspects of 
behavior determined by personal interactions; work will involve analysis of representative 
research studies, and individual projects. Mr. Miller 

PSY 514 Psychologicol Research Design 1 d-O) f 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology 

The objectives of this course are to acquaint students with current developments in theory 
and research in several areas of psychological interest; to foster capability to derive experi- 
mentally testable hypotheses, and experimental tests of these hypotheses; to write and speak, 
effectively about theory and experimentation in psychology. Graduate Staff 

PSY 530 Abnormal Psychology 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, PSY 302 

A study of the causes, symptomatic behavior, and treatment of the major personality dis- 
turbances, emphasis also placed on preventive mental hygiene methods. Mr. Corter 

PSY 535 Tests and Measurements 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Psychology 

A study of standard tests with an emphasis on the efiBcient selection and use of such instru- 
ments. Mr. Johnson 

PSY 550 Mental Hygiene in Teaching 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Psychology 

A survey of mental hygiene principles applicable to teachers and pupils; practical problems 
in prevention and treatment of psychological problems in schools; case studies and research. 

Messrs. Barkiey, Corter 

PSY 565 Industrial Management Psychology 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Nine hours of Psychology 

A study of the application of behavioral science, particularly psychology and social psychology 
to organizational and management problems. Mr. Miller 

PSY 570 Theories of Personality 3 (3-0) f 
Prerequisite: Nine hours of Psychology 

A survey of modern theories of personality with some emphasis on intelligence and cognitive 

factors. Mr. Corter 

PSY 571 Individual Intelligence Measurement 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PSY 570 

A practicum in individual intelligence testing with emphasis on the Wechsler-Bellevue, Stanford- 

Binet, report writing, and case studies. Mr. Corter 

PSY 576 Developmental Psychology 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Nine hours in Psychology, including PSY 476 or PSY 475 

A survey of the role of growth and development in human behavior; particularly of the 
childhood and adolescent periods. This course will pay particular attention to basic principles 
and theories in the area of developmental psychology. Mr. Johnson 

PSY 578 Individual Differences 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Psychology 

Nature, extent, and practical implications of individual differences and individual variation. 

Mr. Barkiey 



Psychology 291 
Courses for Graduates Only 

PSY 604 Advanced Experimental Psychology: Learning and Motivotion 3 (2-3) f or • 

Prerequisite: PSY 501 or equivalent 

The objectives of this course are to promote familiarity with the kinds of research currently 
being conducted within the areas of "learning and motivation;" to foster effective perform- 
ance in writing, speaking and reading in this area, in the derivation of hypotheses capable 
of experimental test and in the design of experiments to test them. 

Messrs. Cook, Newman 

PSY 606 Behavior Theory 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, a course in learning. Experimental Psychology and Statistics 
A study of the most fundamental considerations in behavior theory. Such topics as criteria 
of scientific meaningfulness, the nature of scientific explanation, the application of formal, 
logical techniques to theory analysis, the nature of probability, operationism, intervening 
variables, etc., will be covered. The aim of the course is to develop skill in handling theoretical 
concepts, the ability to analyze and evaluate theories, to deduce hypotheses from them, and 
to devise means of testing them. Mr. Cook 

PSY 607 Advanced Industrial Psychology I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: Nine hours of Psychology and Statistics or concurrent with Statistics 
Application of scientific methods to the measurement and understanding of industrial be- 
havior. Messrs. Drewes, Miller 

PSY 608 Advanced Industrial Psychology II 3 (3-0) ■ 

Prerequisite: PSY 607 

Application of scientific methods to the measurement and understanding of industrial be- 
havior. Messrs. Drewes, Miller 

PSY 609 Psychological Clinic Practicum Maximum 9 hours f s 

Prerequisite: Eight hours in Psychology 

Clinical participation in interviewing, counseling, psychotherapy and administration of 

psychological tests. Practicum to be concerned with adults and children. Mr. Corter 

PSY 610 Theories of Learning 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PSY 604 

The objectives of this course are to promote learning of the theories currently used to ex- 
plain how learning and forgetting occur so that testable consequences of these theories can 
be derived and so that the theories and their testable consequences are capably written and 
spoken about. Messrs. Johnson, Newman 

PSY 612 Seminar in Industrial Psychology 3 (3-0) f s 

Scientific articles, analysis of experimental designs in industrial psychology, and study of 
special problems of interest to graduate students in Industrial Psychology. 

Graduate Staff 

PSY 613 Research in Psychology Credits by arrangement 

Individual or group research problems; a maximum of six credits is allowed toward the 
master's degree. Graduate Staff 

PSY 635 Psychological Measurement 3 (3-0) • 

Prerequisites: ST 511 or equivalent and 12 hours of Psychology 

Theory of psychological measurement. Statistical problems and techniques in test construction. 

Mr. Drewes 

PSY 672 Personality Measurement 3 (2-3) f • 

Prerequisites: PSY 570, PSY 571 

Theory and practicum in individual personality testing of children and adults with emphasis 
on projective techniques, other personality measures, report writing and case studies. 

Mr. Corter 



292 The General Catalog 

Recreation and Park Adminisf-ration 

Courses for Undergraduates 

RPA 152 Introduction to Recreation 3 (3-0) f s 

This course is designed to provide instruction in the areas of history and foundations of 
recreation including objectives, economic and social aspects, definition and importance; status of 
organized recreation in our modern society; certain applied principles of recreation; recreation 
leadership; activities and program planning; and tournament planning and administration. 
The course is of lecture-laboratory technique. Mr. Hines 

RPA 153 The Aquatic Program 2 (0-4) f s 

Prerequisite: PE (swimming) 

This is a laboratory course including the history of the techniques and methods of teaching 
swimming, modern methods of teaching diving, oflBciating, games, pageants, the use of small 
craft, life-saving techniques, principles of water safety, the organization and administration 
of water safety programs and the maintenance of the swimming pool and water front. 

Mr. Stott 

RPA 201 Playground Leadership 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: RPA 152 

Emphasis is placed on the principles, techniques, and activities necessary for effective play- 
ground leadership. Special emphasis is given through the following practical laboratory experi- 
ences: activities of low organization; contests; relays; acquatic activities; table games; and 
elementary arts and crafts. Mr. Miller 

RPA 207 History and Principles of Park Administration 2 (2-0) f s 
Prerequisite: RPA 152 

This course includes the study of the history, present status and the basic principles of 

operation of parks and park systems in America. Mr. Miller 

RPA 253 Principles of Physical Education 3 (3-0) f s 

This course is designed to give the student a professional orientation in physical education 
and the place of physical education activities in allied and related fields. It introduces the 
student to the program of physical education— its interpretation in the light of present day 
needs, its sociological basis, aims and objectives and a sampling of program activities. 

Mr. Brantley 

RPA 255 Social Recreation 4 (2-4) f s 

Prerequisite: Sophomore status 

This course is designed to satisfy the needs of the recreator for conducting social play. Stress 
is placed on the acquiring of technical knowledge of social activities including rhythmics and 
square dancing, and the conducting of specific types of activities. Mr. Crawford 

RPA 301 Organization and Administration of Physical Education 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: RPA 253 

This course is designed to prepare students to meet the problems of organization and admin- 
istration of physical education. It presents the solution to many of the problems facing the 
administrator and teacher in organizing and administering a physical education program 
with analogies of these problems to other areas in the field of recreation. 

Mr. Brantley 

RPA 315 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ZO 213 

This course is designed for students in residence and for individuals in-service. Directors of 
community centers, boys clubs, coaches of athletic teams, athletic directors and others are 
confronted constantly with the prevention and the care of athletic injuries. The course is of 
lecture-laboratory technique. Mr. Crawford 



Recreation and Park Administration 293 

RPA 333 First Aid and Safety 2 (1-2) f t 

This course stresses first aid and safety education in relation to the home, school and com- 
munity. It strongly emphasizes safety principles as applied to activities of the gymnasium, 
playgrounds and athletic fields. Laboratory will provide practice in first aid skill. 

Mr. Crawford 

RPA 335 Camping and Outdoor Education 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior status 

This course covers the history of school camping and outdoor education. The scope of this 
course is to provide the student with a background of principles, organization and adminis- 
trative techniques, and camping skills to be utilized in a school operated program. 

Mr. Stott 

RPA 353 Camp Organization and Leadership 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisites: RPA 153 and RPA 201 

This course surveys the development of organized camping and the educational, health, and 
recreational objectives of camping. Program planning and leadership training in community, 
private, agency and school camping is emphasized. Laboratory will provide practice in camp- 
craft skills. Mr Stott 

RPA 354 Personal and Community Hygiene 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisite: Junior status 

This course presents the essential present-day knowledge of personal and community health. 
Emphasis is placed upon health problems, disease prevention, communicable diseases and 
their control, public health administration, school and industrial hygiene and various other 
health problems confronting the individual and community. The course presents valuable 
and interesting health information to college men and women in order that they might live 
more intelligently in terms of newer health concepts and also be better prepared to assume 
their responsibilities as citizens of their respective communities. Mr. Brantley 

RPA 355 Sports in Recreation 4 (2-4) f a 

Prerequisite: RPA 152 

This course provides for group instruction and laboratory experience in a variety of sports 
applicable to a recreation setting. Emphasis is given to problems involved in the organization 
and administration of a community sports program. OfiBciating techniques applicable to recrea- 
tion sports are utilized. Mr, Brantley 

RPA 360 Individual Corrective and Adapted Activities 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ZO 212, 213 

This course provides students with: methods to motivate the atypical individual to not only 
his physical condition but also his outlook on life to utilize modern educational principles 
and sport activities which will satisfy the handicapped individual's needs, interest, and capa- 
city. Mr. Crawford 

RPA 365 Methods and Materials in Health and Physical Education 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: RPA 301 

This course presents to the prospective physical activity instructor methods and materials of 
instruction; also the course provides study in the areas of healthful school living, health 
service, and health instruction. Mr. Brantley 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

RPA 405 Principles and Practices of Recreation 3 (3-0) f s 
Prerequisite: RP.A 415 

A study of existing practices of recreation, their operation, methods of finance, scope, and 
problems are emphasized. The inter-relationship and inter-dependence of all forms of organ- 
ized recreation are stressed. Mr. Hines 



294 The General Catalog 

RPA 415 Pork Maintenance and Operation 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: RPA 152 

This course deals with methods of operation of various park facilities for public use; inter- 
pretive and public use programs; information and education; park personnel administration; 
protection and law enforcement; preventive maintenance; job planning and scheduling; mod- 
ern maintenance techniques and maintenance materials. Mr. Stott 

RPA 451 Facility and Site Planning 3 (0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: RPA 415 

This course includes the history of park and recreation facility development and trends in 
recreation facility planning. Emphasis is placed upon the planning principles involved in the 
design and layout of recreation areas and recreation buildings. Field trips will enable the 
student to see the various types of recreation facilities. Mr. Stott 

RPA 452 Recreation Administration 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: RPA 470 

This course deals with the internal organization of a recreation department; financing; 
accounting and financial procedure; budget making and control; records, reports and filing; 
program planning and control; personnel policies and organization; and public relations. 

Mr. Hines 

RPA 470 Supervised Practice 6 (9 weeks) Summer 

Prerequisites: RPA 353, 355 

This course is intended to provide the prospective recreation director with an opportunity to 
acquire experience in the skills and techniques involved in the organization and administration 
of recreation activities in an established program. Each student prior to his senior year will 
spend 9 weeks off-campus in a selected location. (A minimum of 225 contact hours are 
required) The student will have the opportunity to observe the activities and practices of 
the recreation executive, to organize and conduct activities under supervision, to observe 
activities and practices of experienced recreation activity leaders and to observe the main- 
tenance and operation of facilities. Mr. Miller 

RPA 471 Organizing the Recreation Program 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: RPA 470 

This course includes the t^'pes of recreation opportunities to be made available to individ- 
uals, groups or communities to be served and the methods of providing these opportunities. 
Activities to be considered are classified as arts and crafts; dance; drama; games, sports and 
athletics; hobbies; music; outdoor recreation; reading, writing and speaking; social recrea- 
tion; special events and voluntary service. The lecture-discussion technique is used. Outside 
studies and assigned readings with reports are required. Mr. Miller 

RPA 472 Observation and Field Experience 2 (0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: RPA 470 

This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to observe, appraise 
and evaluate: the operation of program activities; teaching methods; administrative, supervis- 
ory and organizational techniques; procedures and conduct of advisory and commission meet- 
ings; professional conferences and society meetings. Students will be expected to complete 
this entire gamut. By use of field experience the student will be expected to prepare written 
reports of observations. Only those experiences approved by the recreation faculty shall be 
accepted. Mr. Miller 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

RPA 501 Special Problems in Recreation 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: RPA 470 

A survey of specific problems in recreation. Aims to develop critical analysis. Forms a basis 
for the organization of research projects, for the compilation and organization of material in 
a functional relationship and for the foundation of policies. Follows the seminar procedure. 

Mr. Hines 



Electrical Engineering 295 

Electrical Engineering 

Courses for Undergraduates 

EE 201 Elementary Circuits and Fields 4 (2-5) f t 

Corequisite: MA 201 

Required of sophomores in Electrical Engineering 

Fundamental laws of electric circuits. Introduction to transient and steady-state analysis. 

Problem drill and laboratory exercises. Staff 

EE 202 Elementary Circuits and Fields 4 (2-5) s 

Prerequisites: EE 201, MA 201 

Required of sophomores in Electrical Engineering 

A continuation of EE 201. Introduction to magnetic circuits, magnetic and electric fields, 

energy conversion and two-port active elements. Problem drill and laboratory exercises. 

Staff 

EE 301, 302 Intermediate Circuits and Fields 4 (2-5) f 

3 (2-2) s 
Prerequisites: EE 202, PY 202, and MA 202 
Required of juniors in Electrical Engineering 

An intermediate treatment of lumped-constant alternating-current circuits in the steady gtate. 
Single-and three-phase circuits. Discussion of electric and magnetic fields, distributed con- 
stants, and traveling waves. The theory of transmission lines at power and audio frequencies. 
Filters and impedance matching. One three-hour laboratory per week is included in the first 
semester. Staff 

EE 305 Electrical Machinery 4 (2-5) f 

Prerequisite: EE 202 

Required of juniors in Electrical Engineering 

A classroom and laboratory study of the principles, performance, and characteristics of 

direct-current and alternating-current machinery. Staff 

EE 306 Electrical Machinery 4 (3-3) s 
Prerequisites: EE 301 and EE 305 

A continuation of EE 305 into more advanced phases of the theory of alternating- and direct- 
current machinery. Staff 

EE 310 Illumination 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: EE 301 or EE 320 or EE 331 

A study of the principles involved in the production and utilization of light from artificial 
sources; of the requirements for good lighting; and of the design of lighting installations for 
schools and industry. Mr. Winkler 

EE 314 Electronics 4 (2-5) 
Prerequisite: EE 301 

A study of active vacuum, gas, and solid state devices as elements of electric circuits. Analysis 

is made of linear and non-linear representation and operation. Mr. Manning 

EE 320 Elements of Electrical Engineering 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisites: MA 202 and PY 202 

Required of seniors in MEA, AGE, MIC, CHE, MIG, CE 

Principles, characteristics, and operation of electric equipment and systems. Theory and 
problems in applied electricity, motor characteristics, industrial applications, and electronics. 

Mr. Smiley 

EE 331, 332 Principles of Electrical Engineering 4 (3-3) f « 

Prerequisites: MA 202 and PY 202 

Required of seniors in Industrial Engineering and Mechanical Engineering 
Basic concepts, electrical power generation and utilization, circuit elements, single and poly- 
phase a.c. circuits, transformers, rotating electrical machines. Fundamentals of electronics 
and control circuits. Staff 



296 The General Catalog 

EE 350 Electric Power Utilization in Manufacturing Processes 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: PY 212 

Introduction to basic electrical theory; d-c and a-c circuits and measurements; study of d-c 
motors and of single-phase and polyphase utilization equipment; basic control systems and 
brief introduction to principles of automatic control. Application examples will be drawn 
from the technologies of particular interest to the students in the class. Mr. Smiley 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

EE 401 Advanced Circuits and Fields A 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisites: EE 302, MA 301 

Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering 

Transient analysis of electric circuits by the Laplace transform method, the study of transient 

and sinusoidal steady-state response in terras of poles and zeros of network functions. 

Staff 

EE 402 Advanced Circuits and Fields B 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisites: EE 302 and MA 301 

Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering 

A study of classical electric and magnetic field theory and its application to the problems 

of electrical engineering. Consideration of electrostatics, magnetostatics, radiation, and guided 

waves. Staff 

EE 411 Electrical Engineering Senior Seminar 1 (0-2) f 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering 

Weekly meetings for the delivery and discussion of student papers on topics of current in- 

interest in Electrical Engineering. Staff 

EE 430 Essentials of Electrical Engineering 4 (3-3) 

Prerequisite: EE 301 or EE 332 

Not available to undergraduates in Electrical Engineering 

Essential theory of electric circuits, including electron tubes, solid state devices, transformers 
and rotating machines as needed to supply the electrical background for instrumentation and 
control theory. Intended primarily for graduate students who do not have an electrical engi- 
neering undergraduate degree. Staff 

EE 431 Electronic Engineering 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: EE 302, EE 314 
Departmental elective for seniors 

Comprehensive coverage of circuits and equipment using electronic devices; variable fre- 
quency effects; amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, detectors, wave-shaping circuits, generators 
of non-linear waveforms; basic pulse techniques; principles of electronic analogue computers. 
Emphasis on quantitative analysis and engineering design. Mr. Barclay 

EE 432 Communication Engineering 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: EE 431 

Departmental elective for seniors in Electrical Engineering 

Application of electronic circuits and equipment to radio and wire communication systems. 

Elements ot complete systems, wave propagation, antennas, transmitters, receivers, television, 

radar, electronic navigation systems, noise, special applications. Mr. Barclay 

EE 433 Electric Power Engineering 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: EE 302 and EE 305 

Departmental elective for seniors in Electrical Engineering 

A study of industrial power supply and power factor correction; direct- and alternating-cur- 
rent motor characteristics, starting methods, dynamic braking and speed control; motor appli- 
cations, and industrial control apparatus. Mr. Bell 



Electrical Engineering 297 

EE 434 Power System Analysis 3 (2-3) ■ 

Prerequisites: EE 302 and EE 305 

Departmental elective for seniors in Electrical Engineering 

Analysis of problems encountered in the long-distance transmission of electric power. Line 
parameters of the method of geometric mean distances. Circle diagrams, symmetrical com- 
ponents, and fault calculations. Elementary concepts of power system stability. Applications 
of digital computers to power-system problems. Mr. Stevenson 

EE 435 Elements of Control 3 (2-3) f 
Prerequisites: EE 314 and EE 305; or EE 430 
Departmental elective for seniors in Electrical Engineering 

Introductory theory of open and closed loop control. Functions and performance require- 
ments of typical control systems and system components. Dynamic analysis of error detectors, 
amplifiers, motors, demodulators, analogue components and switching devices. Component 
transfer characteristics and block diagram representation. Mr. Peterson 

EE 438 Instrumentation in Nuclear Technology 3 (2-3) ■ 

Prerequisites: Either EE 430 or EE 301, EE 305 and EE 314; also MA 301 
Required course in Nuclear Engineering, Instrumentation Option curriculum 
Radiation detectors, pulse amplifiers, pulse shapers, amplitude discriminators, counters, co- 
incidence circuits. Mr. Manning 

EE 440 Fundomentols of Digital Systems 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: EE 314 or EE 430 

Departmental elective for seniors in Electrical Engineering 

The basic theory of digital computation and control. Introduction to number systems, data 

handling, relay algebra, switching logic, memory circuits, the application of electronic 

devices to switching circuits, and the design of computer control circuits. Mr. Bell 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EE 503 Lineor Network Theory 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: Senior standing in Electrical Engineering with "B" average in Electrical Engineer- 
ing and Mathematics or EE 430 

Analysis of linear networks with emphasis on the system functions of the network in the 
frequency domain and response in the time domain. 

EE 506 Dynamical Analogies 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisites: EE 301 or EE 331; EM 312 or EM 301; MA 301; "B" average in Electrical En- 
gineering, Engineering Mechanics, and Mathematics 

A study of dynamic systems in various branches of engineering and science with emphasis 
on the similarities that exist among such integrated groups of devices. Analogous elements 
and quantities in these fields as determined from equations basic to each. Analytical formu- 
lation of system problems in acoustical, electrical, mechanical, and related fields and their 
solution by analog methods. Use of electronic analog computers for the solution of system 
problems. Mr. Eckels 

EE 507 Electromagnetics 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: Senior standing in Electrical Engineering with "B" average in Electrical Engi- 
neering and Mathematics or EE 430 

Basic principles of electromagnetic field theory in vector analysis formulation, including static 
electric and magnetic fields. Maxwell's equations and applications to guided waves. 

EE 512 Communication Theory 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: EE 431, "B" average in Electrical Engineering and Mathematics 

The frequency and time domain, modulation, random signal theory, autocorrelation, basic 

information theory, noise, communication systems. Mr. Barclay 



298 The General Catalog 

EE 516 Feedback Control Systems 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: EE 401 and EE 435 

Departmental elective for seniors in Electrical Engineering 

Study of feedback systems for automatic control of physical quantities such as voltage, speed 

and mechanical position. Theory of regulating systems and servo-mechanisms. Steady state 

and transient responses. Evaluation of stability. Transfer function loci and root locus plots. 

Analysis using differential equation and operational methods. System and compensation and 

introduction to design. Mr. Peterson 

EE 517 Control Laborotory 1 (0-3) s 

Corequisite: EE 516 

Laboratory study of feedback systems for automatic control of physical quantities such as 
voltage, speed and mechanical position. Characteristics of regulating systems and servo-mechan- 
isms. The laboratory work is intended to contribute to an understanding of the theory 
developed in EE 516, Feedback Control Systems. Mr. Peterson 

EE 520 Fundamentals of Logic Systems 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: EE 314 or EE 430 

Boolean algebra, logic circuits, systematic minimization, block diagrams, logic systems in com- 
puters, diode and transistor logic, pulse operation, counters, multivibrators, cascaded systems, 
sequential systems. Mr. Bell 



Courses for Graduates Only 

EE 605, 606 Electrical Engineering Seminar 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Electrical Engineering 

A series of papers and conferences participated in by the instructional staff, invited guests, 

and students who are candidates for advanced degrees, Mr. Eckeb 

EE 611, 612 Electric Network Synthesis 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EE 501 

A study of modern network theory, with the emphasis on synthesis, based on the work of 
Brune, Bode, Guillemin Bott and Duffin, Foster and many others. Both the realization prob- 
lem and the approximation problem will be treated. Mr. Hoadley 

EE 613 Advanced Feedback Control 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: EE 516 

An advanced study of feedback systems for the control of physical variables. Analysis of 
follower systems and regulators. Mathematical and graphical description of systems. Stability 
theory and performance criteria. Frequency response and root locus methods of analysis. 
System compensation and design. Introductory analysis of non-linear systems. 

Mr. Peterson 

EE 615 Electromagnetic Waves 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: EE 502 

Maxwell's equations applied to a study of the propagation of energy by electromagnetic 
waves. Vector and scaler retarded potentials, propagation in free space and material media, 
guided electromagnetic waves, common waveguides, skin efifects, resonant cavities. Micro- 
wave network theory applied to measurement problems. Mr. Schafer 

EE 616 Microwave Electronics 4 (3-3) 8 

Prerequisite: EE 615 

Frequency limitations of conventional electron tubes. Microwave p>ower generation and control 
by interaction of electromagnetic fields with charged particles and molecular energy levels, 
and by non-linear reactances. Applications in klystrons, magnetrons, traveling-wave tubes, 
masers, and reactance amplifiers. Measurement problems and techniques in microwave region. 

Mr. Barclay 



Electrical Engineering 299 

EE 617 Pulse Switching and Timing Circuits 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: EE 501 and EE 512 

Tube and transistor circuit techniques for the production, shaping, and control of nonsinusoi- 
dal wave forms. Fundamental circuits needed in pulse information systems, instrumentation, 
and computers. Mr. Barclay 

EE 618 Antennas and Propagation 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: EE 615 

Electromagnetic wave theory applied to antennas and antenna arrays with emphasis on micro- 
wave frequencies. Calculation and measurement of directional characteristics, gain, field in 
tensity, propagation via the ionosphere over various terrains, obstacle gain, gain height 
theory, forward scatter and other topics. Mr. Schafer 

EE 621 Electron Devices 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: EE 615 

Internal operation of electron tubes and transistors; similarities and differences stressed. 
Electrical conduction through vacuum and semi-conductors. Space charge, junction and diffu- 
sion effects. Characteristics of tubes and semiconductor devices at low frequencies and in 
various environments, parameters, and equivalent circuits of active devices. 

Mr. Schafer 

EE 637 Circuit Analysis of Power Systems 3 (3-0) f 
Prerequisite: EE 514 

An advanced treatment of symmetrical components applied to unsymmetrical systems, and 

simultaneous faults. Mr. Stevenson 

EE 638 Power System Stability 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: EE 514 

A study of the principal factors affecting stability and of the method of making stability 

calculations. Illustrations of studies made on actual power systems. Mr. Stevenson 

EE 641 Advanced Digital Computer Theory 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: EE 520 

A study of the circuits and components of modem digital computers, including basic logic 
systems, codes, advanced systems of circuit logic, vacuum tube, transitor, and magnetic com- 
ponents. Memory devices, counters, converters, adders, accumulators, imputs, outputs, and 
computer control systems will be analyzed. Mr. Bell 

EE 643 Advanced Electrical Measurements 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisites: EE 501, EE 431 

A critical analysis of circuits used in electrical measurements, with special attention to such 
topics as balance convergence, effects of strays, sensitivity, the use of feedback in electronic 
devices, and automatic measuring systems. Mr. Hoadley 

EE 645, 646 Advanced Electromagnetic Theory 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EE 615 or PY 503; MA 512 

A comprehensive study of electromagnetic theory with emphasis on field theory applications. 
Charges in both uniform and accelerated motion, field equivalence principles, anisopropic 
media, ferrite media, variational methods for waveguide discontinuities, periodic structures 
including Floquet's theorem, integral transform and function-theoretical techniques, solid 
state theory applied to quantum electronic devices. Mr. Schafer 

EE 650 Electrical Engineering Research Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Electrical Engineering and approval of adviser 

Graduate Staff 

EE 661, 662 Special Studies in Electrical Engineering 3 (3-0) f s 

This course provides an opportunity for small groups of advanced graduate students to study, 
under the direction of qualified members of the professional staff, advanced topics in their 
special fields of interest. Graduate Staff 



300 The General Catalog 

Engineering 

E 100 Introduction to Engineering 1 (1-0) f s 

Introduces the student to the profession of engineering and the characteristics and require- 
ments of the study of engineering. Mr. Adams 

E 500 Engineering Analysis 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and selection for Honors Programs in Engineering 
This is an engineering "case method" experience, making use of the principles of engineering, 
physics and mathematics. Professors in Engineering and certain key individuals from industry 
will work singly with the professor in charge to introduce challenging engineering situations 
and to stimulate student analysis. 



Engineering Honors 



EH 300 Contemporary Trends In Engineering and Science 1 (1-0) f t 

Prerequisite: For juniors in the Engineering Honors Program 

Representatives from varied fields of engineering and science introduce and discuss topics of 

current significance in their areas of interest. 

EH 344 Rigid Body Dynamics I 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisite: For members of the Engineering Honors Program or by permission of the 
instructor 

The study of the concepts and principles relating to the kinematics and kinetics of particles 
and rigid bodies. Illustration of the consequences and applications of the principles through 
problems of ballistics, orbital motion, vibrations, etc. The vector treatment is used exten- 
sively. 

EH 345 Strength of Materials 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisites: EM 311, EM 341. For members of the Engineering Honors Program or by 
permission of the instructor 

Introduction to the behavior of deformable solids. Development of relationships among loads, 
stresses, strains, and displacements. Mathematical representation and analysis of the behavior 
of shells, beams, shafts, columns, etc. 

EH 346 Fluid Mechanics 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: EM 312 or EH 344, MA 301. For members of the Engineering Honors Pro- 
gram or by permission of the instructor 

Study of the concepts and principles relating to fluid mechanics. Equilibrium of liquids and 
gases, kinematics and dynamics of frictionless fluids. Motion of viscous fluids. Dynamics of 
gases. Flow measurement techniques. 

EH 371 Thermodynamics I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: For members of the Engineering Honors Program or by permission of the 
instructor 

A study of the basic principles and concepts of thermodynamics. The First and Second Laws 
are studied with emphasis on the generality and consequences of the basic laws. The mathe- 
matics of property relationships as well as properties of working substances are investigated. 
Applications of the principles to diverse fields such as elasticity, electromagnetism, pro- 
pulsion are presented to emphasize generality. 

EH 372 Thermodynamics II 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisites: EH 371. For members of the Engineering Honors Program or by permission of 
the instructor 

Thermodynamics of compressible fluid flow, normal shock relations, generalized conservation 
equations, nozzle flow, one dimensional flows, thermodynamic equilibrium, free energy func- 
tions, Gibbs phase rule, and generalized criteria for equilibrium. Thermodynamics of chemi- 
cally reactive systems, stoichiometry, standard states, heats of reation and formation, equili- 
brium composition, adiabatic flame temperature, dissociation. Introduction to Statistical 
Thermodynamics, thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, thermodynamics of radiation. 



Engineering Mechanics 301 

EH 401 Special Topics in Engineering 1-4 f s 

Prerequisite: For members of the Engineering Honors Program or by permission of the 

instructor 

Special projects in various phases of engineering. 



Engineering Mechanics 



Courses for Undergraduates 

EM 200 Introduction to Mechanics 3 (3-0) f t 

Corequisite: MA 301 

An introduction to the principles and concepts which form the basis for studies in dynamics, 
solid mechanics, and fluid mechanics. The nature and properties of force systems and stress 
fields. The motion of particles and description of deformation of continuous media. The role 
of Newton's laws, the concepts of continuity and equilibrium, and the conservational prin- 
ciples in problems in mechanics. 

EM 301 Solid Mechanics 1 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 200 

Introduction to the mechanics of deformable solids. Development of the equations which 
describe the linear elastic solid. Approximate solutions and solutions governed by the theory 
of elasticity to problems involving prescribed force systems, states of motion, or energy inputs. 

EM 302 Solid Mechanics II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 301 

Continuation of EM 301. Equations for thin plates. Introduction to the theory of plasticity. 

Theories of yielding, plastic stress-strain relationships, and two-dimensional problems in plastic 

behavior. 

EM 303 Fluid Mechanics I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 200 

Development of the basic equations of fluid mechanics in general and specialized form. 
Application of these specialized equations to a variety of topics including (1) fluid statics, 
(2) inviscid, incompressible fluid flow, and (3) viscous, incompressible fluid flow. 

EM 304 Fluid Mechanics II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 303 

Continuation of EM 303. Further applications of the basic equations of fluid mechanics 
to (1) boundary layer analysis, (2) laminar and turbulent flows and (3) compressible fluid 
flow. Introduction to experimental methods in fluid mechanics. 

EM 341 Mechanics A (Statics) 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisites: PY 201 or PY 211, MA 201 or MA 211 

Forces, resultants and equilibrium of concurrent, parallel and non-concurrent non-parallel 
force systems; statics applied to engineering problems and the solution of stress in simple 
trusses. Centroids and moments of inertia. 

EM 342 Mechanics B (Dynamics) 2 (2-0) f t 

Prerequisite: EM 341 or EM 200 

The kinematic and kinetic study of motion of particles and rigid bodies; absolute and rela- 
tive motion. Methods of force, mass and acceleration; work and energy impulse and momen- 
tum. 

EM 343 Strength of Materials A 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 200 or EM 341 

Axial and shear stresses and strains; pure torsion of cirailar shafts; external shears and 
moments; the distribution of internal shearing and bending stresses; introduction to deflection 
theory; column theory; design of axially loaded columns. 



302 The General Catalog 

EM 401 Experimental Mechanics I 3 (0-6) f s 

Prerequisites: EM 301. 303 

A course in the principal experimental methods employed in the analysis of contemporary 
problems of engineering in which mechanics dominates. Special emphasis is given to those 
phenomena which give rise to instruments for measurement of prime mechanical variables. 
Experimental analysis of mechanical fields and interpretation of date are major topics. 

EM 402 Experimental Mechanics II 3 (0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 401 

Selected experiments which illustrate basic phenomena of mechanics in engineering systems. 
A particular emphasis is the experimental synthesis of such systems and the evaluation of 
their behavior as designed. 

EM 430 Fluid Mechanics 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 342 

Fluid statics, kinematics, Bernoulli equation, momentum, free-surface flow, viscosity, pipe 
friction, drag on submerged bodies, lift, elastic wave propagation. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EM 501, 502 Continuum Mechanics I, II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EM 301; 303; ME 301; MA 405 

The concepts of stress and strain are presented in generalized tensor form. Emphasis is placed 
on the discussion and relative comparison of the analytical models for a series of continua 
including the linear elastic solid, the perfect fluid and the viscous (Newtonian) fluid. The 
underlying thermodynamic principles are presented, the associated boundary value problems 
are formulated and selected examples are used to illustrate the theory. 

EM 503 Theory of Linear Elasticity 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EM 301; MA 301 

The differential equation approach employed in development of the equations representing 
the behavior of a linear elastic solid. The elastic problem formulated in two and three dimen- 
sions and various coordinate systems. Application of the theory illustrated through selected 
problems. 

EM 504 Mechanics of Ideal Fluids 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: EM 430 or EM 304; Corequisite: MA 513 

Basic equations of ideal fluid flow; potential and stream functions; vortex dynamics; body 
forces due to flow fields; method of singularities in two-dimensional flows; analytical deter- 
mination of potential functions; conformal transformations; free-streamline flows. 

EM 505 Mechanics of Viscous Fluids 1 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: EM 430 or EM 304; Corequisite MA 532 

Equations of motion of a viscous fluid (Navier-Stokes Equations); general properties of the 
Navier-Stokes equations; some exact solutions of the Navier Stokes equations; boundary layer 
equations; some approximate methods of solution of the boundary layer equations; laminar 
boundary layers in axi-symmetric and three-dimensional flows; unsteady laminar boundary 
layers. 
(Offered in fall semester of 1962-63) 

EM 506 Mechanics of Compressible Fluid I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: EM 430 or EM 304; ME 302; Corequisite: MA 532 

Introduction to compressible fluid flow; isentropic, one-dimensional flow; Rayleigh and Fanno 
line flows; generalized one-dimensional flow; normal shock waves; introduction of multi- 
dimensional, compressible flow. 
(Offered in the fall semester of 1963-64) 

EM 507 Systems Analysis 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: EM 301; 303; MA 511 

A course in the design of engineering systems in which mechanics dominates. 
(Offered in the fall semester of 1963-64) 



Engineering Mechanics 303 

EM 508 Systems Synthesis 3 (3-0) a 

Prerequisite: EM 507 

A course in the design of engineering systems in which mechanics dominates. 

(Offered in the fall semester of 1963-64) 

EM 509 Space Mechanics I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: EM 302; EM 304; Corequisite: MA 511 

The application of mechanics to the analysis and design of orbits and trajectories. Trajectory 
computation and optimization; space maneuvers; re-entry trajectories; interplanetary guidance. 
(Offered in the fall semester of 1962-63) 

EM 510 Space Mechanics II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: EM 509; MA 511 

Continuation of EM 509. The analysis and design of guidance systems. Basic sensing devices; 
the characteristics of an inertial space; the theory of stabilized platforms; terrestrial inertial 
guidance. 
(Offered in the spring semester of 1962-63) 

EM 511 Theory of Plates and Shells 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisites: EM 301 accompanied by MA 511 

A modem study of the theory of plates and shells. Topics are selected from problems in- 
volving membranes; folded plates, circular and rectangular slabs, domes, cylindrical shells 
and hyperbolic paraboloids. Solutions are obtained by both classical and modem numerical 
methods. 
(Offered in the spring semester of 1962-63) 

EM 551 Advanced Strength of Materiols 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: EM 301 

Stresses and strains at a point; rosette analysis; stress theories, stress concentration and fatigue; 
plasticity; inelastic, composite and curved beams; prestress energy methods shear deflections; 
buckling problems and column design; and membrane stresses in shells. 

EM 552 Elastic Stability 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: MA 301; MA 405; EM 551 

A study of elastic and plastic stability. The stability criterion as a determinant. The energy 
method and the theorem of stationary potential energy. The solution of buckling problems 
by finite differences and the calculus of variations. The application of successive approxi- 
mations to stability problems. Optimization applied to problems of aeroelastic and civil engi- 
neering structures. 
(Offered in the fall semester of 1963-64) 

EM 555 Dynamics 1 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: EM 301; MA 405 

The theory of vibrations from the Lagrangian formulation of the equations of motion. Free 
and forced vibrations with and without damping, multiple degrees of freedom, coupled 
motion, normal mode vibrations, wave propagation in solid bodies. 
(Offered in the fall semester of 1963-64) 

EM 556 Dynamics II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: EM 301; MA 405 

The dynamics of particles and rigid bodies by the use of formulations of the laws of me- 
chanics due to Newton, Eulcr, Lagrange, and Hamilton. Accelerated reference frames, con- 
strains, Euler's angles, the spinning top, the gyroscope, precession, stability, phase space, and 
nonlinear oscillatory motion. 
(Offered in the spring semester of 1963-64) 



304 The General Catalog 
Courses for Graduates Only 

EM 601, 602 Unifying Concepts in Mechanics I, II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 601 

Generalized treatment of the fundamental equations and boundary value problems of con- 
tinuous and non-continuous media. Use is made of contemporary developments in irreversible 
thermodynamic, statistical mechanics, and electrodynamics to provide a unified foundation 
for the development of principles governing tne dynamics and thermodynamic behavior of 
elastic, plastic and visco-elastic solids, viscous fluids and rheological media. 
(Offered in the fall and spring semesters of 1962-63) 

EM 604 Theory of Plasticity 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 503 

Development of the equations representing the plastic behavior of deformable solids. Yield 
conditions and plastic stress-strain relations. Plane strain theory, hyperbolic equations and 
slip line fields. Selected problems to illustrate the theory. 
(Offered in the spring semester 1963-64) 

EM 605 Plastic Limit Analysis 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: EM 503 

Determination of the load carrying capacity of perfectly plastic structures including frames, 

plates, and shells. Emphasis on the underlying principles and general methods of analysis 

for bodies involving three-dimensional states of stress. 

(Offered in the spring semester of 1962-63) 

EM 611 Mechanics of Compressible Fluids II 3 (3-0) < 

Prerequisite: EM 506 

Continuation of EM 506; linearized theory of two-dimensional, compressible flow; method of 
characteristics for two-dimensional supersonic flow; oblique shock waves; unsteady one-dimen- 
sional flow; shock-wave boundary layer interactions; transonic flow. 
(Offered in the spring semester of 1963-64) 

EM 612 Mechanics of Vicsous Fluids II 3 (3-0) • 

Prerequisite: EM 505 

Continuation of EM 505; phenomenological theories of turbulence; turbulent flow in ducts 
and pipes; turbulent boundary layer with and without pressure gradient; compressible boun- 
dary layer with and without pressure gradient; compressible boundary layer; boundary layer 
control; free viscous flow. 
(Offered in the spring semester of 1962-63) 

EM 695 Experimental Methods in Mechanics Maximum 6 credits s 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

The study of specialized experimental techniques utilized in contemporary research in the 

areas of Mechanics. 

EM 697 Seminars in Mechanics Maximum 3 credits f 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of adviser 

The discussion and development of theory relating to contemporary research in the frontier 

areas of Mechanics. 

EM 698 Special Topics in Mechanics Maximum 9 credits f s 

The study, by small groups of graduate students under the direction of members of the 
faculty, of topics of particular interest in various advanced phases of mechanics. 

EM 699 Research in Mechanics Maximum 6 credits f s 

Individual research in the field of Mechanics. 



English 305 

English 

Freshman English 

ENG 111 Composition ond Rhetoric 3 (3-0) f s 

Required of all freshmen 

Intensive study and practice in the basic forms and principles of expository communication; 

conferences. 

ENG 112 Composition ond Reading 3 (3-0) f s 

Required of all freshmen 

Continued practice in expository writing; research paper; introduction to literary types; 

collateral reading; conferences. 

Note: Qualified students will be allowed to register for ENG 112 and will be given credit 

for both 111 and 112 upon successful completion of the latter. Eligibility for 112 will be 

based on a predetermined score on the Verbal Aptitude section of the SAT plus a composition 

to be written at the first or second class meeting of the 112 section. 

Writing 

ENG 21 1 Business Communications 3 (3-0) f i 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

Practical application of the principles of composition to effective business communications, 
including basic types of correspondence and reports. Special attention will be paid to vocabu- 
lary building, and work will be given in oral business communications. 

ENG 215 Principles of News and Article Writing 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

Introduction to the writing of simple news articles; class criticism of non-technical newspaper 
and magazine articles. 

ENG 216 Advanced Article Writing 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisites: ENG 112 and 215 or equivalent 

A continuation of ENG 215, with intensive practice in writing and criticizing non-technical 

articles. 

ENG 222 Advanced Composition (Creative Writing) 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

A course in creative writing especially designed for students who have demonstrated ability; 
emphasis on short prose fiction. 

ENG 223 Vocabulary Building 3 (3-0) > 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

A system of increasing the student's mastery of useful words as found in the best modem 
English prose. 

ENG 321 Scientific Writing 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

Intensive practice in writing technical and scientific reports, articles for journals, and busi- 
ness letters relating to technical reports. 

ENG 424 Modern English Usage 3 (3-0) f i 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

An intensive study of English grammar with particular emphasis on contemporary usage. A 
brief survey of the historical development of the language will be included. 



306 The General Catalog 

Speech 

ENG 231 Basic Speaking Skills 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

Training in the fundamentals of public speaking; supplementary training in some aspects 

of group discussion (panel, forum, symposium or committee) and in the techniques of good 

listening. 

ENG 332 Argumentation and Persuasion 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ENG 231 or equivalent 

Analysis, brief-drawing and evidence, and methods of proof and refutation; fundamentals of 

conviction; naturalness and forcefulness, extempore speeches, debates and discussions. 

ENG 333 Public Address and Extemporaneous Speaking 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ENG 231 or equivalent 

Public speaking for special occasions, including speech of introduction, committee-room 

speech, after-dinner speech, speech at professional conventions, political speech, formal sales 

talk. 

ENG 334 Oral Reading 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ENG 112 and 231, or approval of the department 

Training in the analysis and presentation of printed materials, technical and semi-technical, 
for platform, radio, and television. Emotional reactions to add color and interest; expressive 
body and voice; correction of faulty habits. 

ENG 336 Parliamentary Practice 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

(Not to be counted toward the fulfillment of any requirement in languages, humanities or 
social sciences without specific authorization.) 

Rules and customs of assemblies, including organization, motions; participation in and con- 
duct of meetings; parliamentary strategy. 

ENG 337 Group Discussion 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: ENG 112 and 231, or approval of the department 

The theory and practice of leading and taking part in such groups as panels, forums, sym- 
posiums, conferences and committees. Oral and written assigiunents. Frequent recordings. 

Literature 

Note: ENG 112 is prerequisite to all courses in literature. 

ENG 205 Reading for Discovery 3 (3-0) f t 

A study of selected masterworks drawn from American, English and European literature with 
emphasis on the great themes and on the approach of the creative artist to basic ideas in 
Western culture. 

ENG 361 Backgrounds of English Civilization (I) 3 (3-0) f 

A reading course in English literature from the Anglo-Saxon invasions to the Romantic 

period, with an emphasis on the contributions of English life and thought to Western Civili- 
zation. 

ENG 362 Backgrounds of English Civilization (II) 3 (3-0) s 

English literature from the Romantic period to the present day. This course may be taken 
either as a continuation of ENG 361 or as an independent course. 

ENG 365 The American Mind (I) 3 (3-0) f 

The development of American thought and civilization as reflected in American literature 
from the colonial settlements through the New England revival of the nineteenth century. 



Entomology 307 

ENG 366 The American Mind (ID 3 (3-0) • 

The background of contemporary American literature and thought, from Mark Twain to 
Hemingway and Faulkner. This course may be taken either as a continuation of ENG 365 
or as an independent course. 

ENG 375 Southern Writers 3 (3-0) a 

An introduction to Southern culture as revealed in poetry and short fiction from Poe to the 

present day. Readings in the Southern essay dealing with social, political, and literary 
problems. 

ENG 382 Short Prose Fiction 3 (3-0) f 

The study of selected short stories by the most representative of contemporary British and 
American writers. 

ENG 460 Literature of Scientific Thought 3 (3-0) f t 

Chief documents of scientific thought from Aristotle to the present day with emphasis on 
literary values. 

ENG 468 Major American Writers 3 (3-0) f s 

Concentrated study of the writings of Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, and Whitman as they 
exemplify the spirit of American individualism. 
(Students may not receive credit for both ENG 365 and ENG 468.) 

ENG 471— The Novel 3 (3-0) f s 

Intensive analysis of some of the most influential English, American, and Continental novels 
chosen to illustrate the structure and the development of the form. 

ENG 480 Modern Drama 3 (3-0) s 

A study of the development of modem drama as a form for the expression of social and 
humanistic ideas through a systematic examination of the plays of Ibsen, Shaw, and Eugene 
O'Neill. 

ENG 485 Shakespeare 3 (3-0) • 

A study of the principal plays with emphasis on reading Shakespeare for enjoyment, 

ENG 496 Literature of the Western World 3 (3-0) f 

Readings from selected great books from the Homeric period of Greek literature to the 
Renaissance in Europe. Emphasis on the contributions of this literature to modern thoughL 

ENG 497 Literature of the Non-Western World 3 (3-0) • 

Study of a selected group of translations from the literature of Persia, India, China, and Japan 
as they reflect cultural backgrounds. 

ENG 498 Contemporary Literoture 3 (3-0) s 

A study of selected examples of American, British, and Continental writing from 1890 to the 
present day with reference to changing literary forms and themes. 

ENG 499 Literary Analysis (Senior Seminar) 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisites: ENG 112 and departmental approval 

A flexible course in reading and criticism designed to synthesize the student's preceding work 

in literature and to provide a capstone for his undergraduate program. 



Entomology 

Courses for Undergraduates 

ENT 301 Introduction to Forest Insects 3 (2-2) f 

An introductory course covering the fundamentals of classification, development, habit, and 
control of forest insects. Mr. Farrier 



308 The General Catalog 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic Insects 3 (2-2) f or $ 

A basic course, covering the fundamentals of insect classification, development, food habits, 
and controls. Mr. Brett 

ENT 322 Beekeeping 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

A basic course dealing with the place of the honeybee in our agricultural economy; the colony 
and its components; management; manipulation; honey production, care and marketing. 

Mr. Stephen 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENT 501-502 Insect Morphology 3 (1-4) f * 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312 

Covers general morphology, external and internal, of the insects and their relatives. ENT 501 
will deal primarily with external morphology and ENT 502 with internal morphology. (Will 
be ofiEered 1963-64 and alternate years.) Mr. Young 

ENT 506 Chemistry of Insecticides 3 (2-2) ■ 

Prerequisites: ENT 312, CH 203 

A study of the critical chemical, physical, and biological properties of compounds used for 
insect control. This course is directed toward obtaining fundamental knowledge of the 
scientific principles underlying modern methods of plant protection including details of actual 
methods of insecticide application. (Will be offered 1963-64 and alternate years). 

Mr. Guthrie 

ENT 511 Systematic Enotomology 3 (1-4) f 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312 

A somewhat detailed survey of the orders and families of insects, designed to acquaint the 
student with these groups and develop in the student some ability in the use of keys, descrip- 
tions, etc. (Will be offered 1963-64 and alternate years.) Mr. Young 

ENT 531 Insect Ecology 3 (2-2) f 
Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312 or equivalent 

The influence of environmental factors on insect development, distribution, and abundance. 

(Will be offered 1963-64 and alternate years.) Mr. Rabb 

ENT 541 Immature Insects 4 (2-4) f 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312 or equivalent 

A study of the characteristics of the immature forms of the orders and principal families of 

insects. (Will be offered 1962-63 and alternate years.) Messrs. Rabb, Neunzig 

ENT 551, 552 Applied Entomology 3 (2-2) f t 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312 

An advanced course in which the principles of applied entomology are studied in respect to 
the major economic insect pests. Methods of determining and examining insect damage, the 
economic importance of insects, and the chief economic pests of man, food, and fiber are 
studied as well as laws and regulations pertaining to insects and insecticides. (Will be offered 
1962-63 and alternate years.) Mr. Mistric 

ENT 561 Literature and History of Entomology 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312 or equivalent 

A general course intended to acquaint the student with literature problems of the scientist, 
mechanics of the library and book classification, bibliographies of the zoological sciences, 
abstract journals, forms of bibliographies, forms of literature, preparation of scientific papers; 
taxonomic indexes and literature (with a historical background) and history of the developn 
ment of zoological science from ancient to modern times with emphasis on entomology. (Will 
be offered 1963-64 and alternate years.) Mr. Farrier 



Entomology 309 

ENT 571 Forest Entomology 3 (2-2) f 
Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312 

A study of methods of identification of forest pests, the factors governing their abundance 

habits, and control. (Will be offered 1963-64 and alternate years.) Mr. Farrier 

ENT 582 (ZO 592) Medical and Veterinary Entomology (Parasitology) 3 (2-3) a 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312 

A study of the morphology, biology and control of the parasitic anthropods of man, domestic 
and wild animals. (Will be offered 1963-64 and alternate years.) 

Messrs. Harkema, Farriet 

ENT 590 Special Problems Credits by orrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor 

Original research on special problems in entomology not related to a thesis problem, but 

designed to provide experience and training in research. Graduate Staff 

ENT 592 Acarology 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312, or ZO 103 

A systematic survey of the mites and ticks with emphasis on identification, biology and con- 
trol of the more common and economic forms attacking material, plants and animals including 
man. (Will be offered 1962-63 and alternate years.) Mr. Farrier 



Courses for Graduates Only 

ENT 602 Principles of Taxonomy 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisite: ENT 511 

A course introducing the methods and tools used in animal taxonomy, designed to promote 
a better understanding of taxonomic literature, and provide a foundation for taxonomic 
research. (Will be offered 1962-63 and alternate years.) Mr. Young 

ENT 61 1 Insect Physiology 4 (3-2) f 

Prerequisite: ENT 312, ENT 502, CH 451, or equivalent 

The course deals with the physiology and biochemistry of insects. The function of the differ- 
ent organ systems and the intermediary metabolism of insects will be considered. Laboratory 
work will include techniques of current importance in physiological research. (Will be offered 
1962-63 and alternate years.) Mr. Hodgson 

ENT 622 Insect Toxicology 4 (2-4) s 

Prerequisite: ENT 312, CH 426 or equivalent 

The course deals with the relationship of chemical structure to toxicity in insects. The bio- 
chemical mechanisms involved in toxication and de-toxication will be stressed as well as 
physiological explanation of the chemical poisoning of insects. The biochemical, behavioral, 
and morphological explanation of resistance to insecticides will be studied. Laboratory work 
involves cholinesterase inhibition, dehydrochlorination of DDT by resistant houseflies, com- 
parative toxicity of insecticides, and bioassay methods. (Will be offered 1962-63 and alternate 
years.) Mr. Guthrie 

ENT 680 Seminar 1-1 f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Entomology or closely allied fields 
Discussion of entomological topics selected and assigned by Seminar Chairman. 

Graduate Staff 

ENT 690 Research Credits by arrongement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Entomology or closely allied fields 

Original research in connection with thesis problem in entomology. Graduate Staff 



310 The General Catalog 

Experimental Statistics 

Courses for Undergraduates 

ST 302 Machine Techniques for Dato Processing 2 (1-2) s 

The use of conventional IBM punch card machines with special emphasis on the processing 
of data using a stored program calculator. Mr. Verlinden 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 (2-2) f s 

This course will relate general statistical concepts to everyday life and will emphasize giving 
perspective to these concepts in place of developing skill. Quantitative descriptions of popu- 
lations, sampling ideas, techniques of making inferences about populations from samples and 
the uncertainties involved in such inferences. Formulation and testing of hypotheses, elemen- 
tary and basic statistical techniques. Messrs. McVay, Monroe 

ST 361 Introduction to Stotistics for Engineers I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: College Algebra 

Survey of statistical techniques useful to engineers and physical scientists. Includes elementary 
probability, frequency distributions, estimation of means and standard deviations, sampling 
variation, control charts, elementary least squares curve fitting. 

Messrs. Hader, Grandage 

ST 362 Introduction to Statistics for Engineers II 3 (2-2) i 

Prerequisite: ST 361 

Continuation of ST 361. Additional and more advanced statistical methodology for engineers 
and physical scientists. Includes least squares method for fitting polynomials and multiple 
regression; chi-square tests; sampling acceptance inspection; introduction to analysis of vari- 
ance and design of experiments. Messrs. Hader, Grandage 

ST 421, 422 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 212 

Elementary mathematical statistics primarily for students not intending to take further work 
in theoretical statistics. Includes introduction to probability, common theoretical distribu- 
tions, moments, moment generating functions, sampling distributions, (F, t, chi-square), ele- 
mentary estimation and hypothesis testing concepts, bivariate distributions, simple and multi- 
ple linear regression, analysis of variance, and elementary design of experiments. Staff 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ST 501, 502 Basic Statistical Analysis 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisite: ST 311 or equivalent or graduate standing 

Basic concepts of statistics; random variables, distributions, statistical measures, estimation, 
tests of significance, analysis of variance, elementary design and sampling, factorial experi- 
ments, multiple regression, analysis of discrete data, and other topics. Intended primarily for 
statistics majors and Ph.D. minors and not intended as a service course for other departments. 

Mr. Steel 

ST 511 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ST 311 or graduate standing 

Basic concepts of statistical models and use of samples; variation, statistical measures, distri- 
butions, tests of significance, analysis of variance and elementary experimental design, re- 
gression and correlation, chi-square. Messrs. Monroe, Rawlings 

ST 512 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ST 511 or equivalent 

Covariance, multiple regression, factorial experiments, individual degrees of freedom, incom- 
plete block designs, experiments repeated over space and time. Mr. Mason 



Experimental Statistics 311 

ST 513 Experimental Statistics for Social Sciences I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ST 311 or graduate standing 

Basic concepts in collection and analysis of data. Variability of sample data, distributions, 
confidence limits, chi-square, t-test, analysis of variance, regression, correlation, analytic and 
descriptive surveys, experimental designs, index numbers. Mr. McVay 

ST 514 Experimental Statistics for Social Sciences 11 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ST 513 or equivalent 

Extension of basic statistical concepts to social experiments and surveys; sampling from finite 
populations and estimating using unrestricted, stratified, systematic, and multistage selections; 
analysis of variance continued; multiple regression; covariance; experimental designs. 

Mr. Proctor 

ST 515, 516 Experimental Statistics for Engineers 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ST 361 or graduate standing 

General statistical concepts and techniques useful to research workers in engineering, textiles, 
wood technology, etc. Probability, distributions, measurement of precision, simple and multiple 
regression, tests of significance, analysis of variance, enumeration data, sensitivity data, life 
testing experiments and experimental design. Mr. Hader 

ST 521 Basic Statistical Inference 3 (2-2) s 
Prerequisites: MA 522 and MA 511 

Frequency distributions and moments; sampling distributions; introductory theory of point 

and interval estimation; tests of hypotheses. Mr. Grandage 

ST 522 Basic Theory of Least Squares and Variance Components 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisies: ST 521 and MA 405 

Theory of least squares; multiple regression; analysis of variance and covariance; experimental 
design models; factorial experiments; variance component models. 

Mr. Anderson 

ST 591 Special Problems 1-3 credits by arrangement f s 

Development of techniques for specialized cases, particularly in connection with thesis and 
practical consulting problems. Graduate Staff 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ST 611, 612 Intermediate Statistical Theory 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: ST 521, MA 512 and MA 405 

This course will provide the additional theory, above that of ST 521, needed for many 
advanced theory courses. Many of the topics of ST 521 will be developed more rigorously, 
with more attention paid to mathematical aspects. Advanced probability theory; limit theorems, 
distribution theory, multinormal distributions. Statistical decision theory, theory of estimation, 
confidence regions, theory of tests of hypotheses, sequential tests, non-parametric methods. 

Mr. Hall 

ST 621 Statistics in Animal Science 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ST 502 or equivalent 

Sources and magnitudes of errors in experiments with animals, experimental designs and 
methods of analysis adapted to specific types of animal research, relative eflBciency of alternate 
designs, amount of data required for specified accuracy, student reports on selected topics. 
Offered in fall of 1963-64 and alternate years. Mr. Lucas 

ST 622 Principles of Biological Assays 3 (2-2) t 

(See ANS 622) 

ST 623 Statistics in Plant Science 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ST 502 or equivalent 

Principles and techniques of planning, establishing, and executing field and greenhouse ex- 
periments. Size, shape and orientation of plots; border effects; selection of experimental 
material; estimation of size of experiments for specified accuracy; scoring and subjective tests; 
subsampling plots and yields for laboratory analysis. Mr. Mason 



312 The General Catalog 

ST 626 Statistical Concepts in Genetics 3 (3-0) t 

Prereciuisite: GN 512; Corequisite: ST 502 or equivalent 

Factors bearing on rates of change in population means and variances, with special reference 
to cultivated plants and domestic animals; selection, inbreeding, magnitude and nature of 
genotvpic and non-genot)'pic variability; experimental and statistical approaches in the 
analysis of quantitative inheritance. Mr. Cockerham 

ST 631 Theory of Sampling Applied to Survey Design 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ST 422; ST 502 or equivalent 

Basic theory of sampling from a finite population. Confidence limits and estimation of 
optimum sample size, comparison of different sample designs, methods and probabilities for 
selection and methods of estimation, choice of a sampling unit, double sampling, matched 
samples. Messrs. Proctor, Koop 

ST 641 (RS 641) Statistics in Sociology 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ST 513 or equivalent 

The application of statistical methods in sociological research. Emphasis on selecting appro- 
priate models, instruments and techniques for the more frequently encountered problems 
and forms of data. Mr. Hamilton 

ST 651 (AGC 651) Econometric Methods I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ST 421; ST 502 or equivalent; AGC 641 

The role and uses of statistical inference in agricultural economic research; measurement 
problems and their solutions arising from the statistical model and the nature of the data; 
limitations and interpretation of results of economic measurement from statistical techniques. 
Topics include the problems of specification, aggregation, identification, multicollinearity and 
autocorrelation. Attention also is given to expectations models and simultaneous stochastic 
equations. Mr. Wallace 

ST 652 (AGC 652) Econometric Methods II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ST 422 and AGC 551 

Techniques for problem analysis in agricultural economics; attention to analysis of time 
series data; non-parametric inference; experimental design in economic research; estimation 
of parameters in production functions and in simultaneous models; selected special topics. 

Mr. Anderson 

ST 661 Advanced Special Problems 1-3 credits by arrangement f t 

Prerequisites: ST 502 or equivalent; ST 522 

Any new advance in the field of statistics which can be presented in lecture series as unique 
opportunities arise, including (a) theory of sampling applied to survey design and (b) analysis 
of messy data. Graduate Staff, Visiting Professors 

ST 671 Advanced Topics in Least Squares and Variance Components 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ST 502 or equivalent; ST 522 

Use of non-balanced designs to estimate variance components; comparison of estimators; prob- 
lems with finite populations. Least squares procedures for non-standard conditions; unequal 
variances, correlated errors, non-additivity, measurement errors, non-normality. Functional 
relationships. Factorial experiments with continuous factor levels; incomplete blocks. 

Mr. Anderson 

ST 672 Special Advanced Topics in Statistical Analysis 3 (3-0) f 
Prerequisites: ST 502 or equivalent; ST 522 

Enumeration data; covariance; non-linear models; discriminant functions and other multi- 
variate techniques. Mr. Monroe 

ST 674 Advanced Topics in Construction and Analysis of Experimental Designs 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ST 502 or equivalent; ST 522 

Inter-block analysis of incomplete blocks designs, partially balanced designs, confounding, 
data collected at several places and times, multiple factor designs, change-over trials, analysis 
of groups of means. Graduate Staff 



Food Science 313 

ST 681 Seminor 1 (1-0) f ■ 

A maximum of two credits is allowed toward the master's degree, but any number toward the 
doctorate. Graduate Staff 

ST 691 Research Credits by arrangement f s 

A maximum of nine credits is allowed toward the master's degree; no limitation on credits 
in doctorate programs. Graduate Staff 



Food Science 

Courses for Undergraduates 

FS 301 Food Composition 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: CH 220 or 221 

Basic principles and procedures for the analysis of moisture, ash, carbohydrate, fat and pro- 
tein contents of foods. Measurement of certain physical characteristics of foods. 

Mr. Warren 

FS 303 (ANS 303) Meat and Meat Products 3 (2-3) « 

Prerequisite: CH 351 

Study of live animal and carcass relationship, dressing percentages and cut-out values. Slaughtei<- 
ing, cutting, curing, freezing and handling of meat and meat products for commercial and 
home use. Mr. Blumer 

FS 309 (ANS 309) Meat Setection 1 (0-6) f 

Detailed consideration of factors involved in selection of carcasses and wholesale cuts of beef, 
pork and lamb. Practice in identification of wholesale and retail cuts. Mr. Craig 

FS 331 (AGE 331) Food Engineering 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: PY 211 or 221 

Basic engineering principles applicable, wholly or in part, to food processing. Forms of energy 
and how they can be altered in state, composition, direction or force to fulfill the processing 
requirements. Latest means of energy conversion to affect efficient and practical applications 
to power, heat, refrigeration and irradiation. Instruments and controls for processing with 
applicable principles of fluid flow, heat transfer, air-vapor relationships, filtration, separation 
and materials handling by mechanical and flotation methods. Mr. Jones 

FS 401 Market Milk and Related Products 3 (2-3) f 

Principles of processing, distribution and quality control of fluid milk and related products. 

Mr. Warren 

FS 403 Ice Cream and Related Frozen Dairy Foods 3 (2-3) s 
Prerequisite: FS 401 

Choice, preparation and processing of ingredients and freezing of ice cream and other frozen 

desserts. Mr. Warren 

FS 404 (PO 404) Poultry Products 3 (2-3) f 
Prerequisites: CH 101 and ZO 103 

Selection, processing, grading and packaging poultry meat and eggs. Factors involved in preser- 
vation of poultry meat and eggs. Mr. Fromm 

FS 410 Food Products Evaluation 3 (2-3) • 

Prerequisite: ST 361 

A comprehensive study of problems encountered in new food product development and con- 
sumer acceptance. A study of the nature of sensory responses with emphasis on taste, smell 
and appearance (color) as related to foods; design and methodology of small and large con- 
sumer panel testing; and the application of appropriate mathematical procedures to food 
acceptance testing and methodology, Mr. Hoover 



314 The General Catalog 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

FS 502 Food Chemistry 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CH 220 or 221 

The basic composition, structure and properties of food, and the chemistry of changes oc- 
curring during processing and utilization of the food. Interpret and integrate widely pub- 
lished data in the food field with basic principles of chemistry. Mr. Aurand 

FS 503 Food Anolysis 3 (1-6) s 

Prerequisites: CH 215. CH 351 and FS 502 

A study of the principles, methods and techniques necessary for quantitative physical and 
chemical analyses of food and food products. Results of analysis will be studied and evaluated 
in terms of quality standards and governing regulations. Mr. Aurand 

FS 505 (BO 505) Food Microbiology 3 (2-3) ■ 

Prerequisite: BO 412 

The relationship of habitat to the occurrence of microorganisms on foods; environmental 
factors affecting the growth of various microorganisms in foods; microbiological action in 
relation to food spoilage and food manufacture; physical, chemical and biological destruction 
of microorganisms in foods; methods for microbiological examination of food stuffs; and 
public health and sanitation bacteriology. Mr. Speck 

FS 506 Advanced Food Microbiology 3 (0-9) f 

Prerequisite: FS 505 or consent of instructor 

Ecology and physiology of microorganisms important in the manufacture and deterioration 
of various classes of foods; the identification of representative species of such microorganisms 
isolated from natural environments; principles of nutrition, symbiosis and bacteriophage 
activity in culture maintenance for food production. Mr. Speck 

FS 511 Food Science Seminar 1 (1-0) s 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing and consent of instructor 

A review and discussion of scientific articles, progress reports in research and special problems 

of interest. Graduate Staff 

FS 512 Special Problems in Food Science 1-3 (arranged) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing and consent of instructor 

Analysis of scientific, engineering and economic problems of current interest in foods. The 
scientific appraisal and solution of a selected problem. The problems are designed to provide 
training and experience in research. Graduate Staff 

FS 521, 522 Technology of Fruit and Vegetable Products 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: BO 412 

Comprehensive treatment of principles and methods of preservation of fruits and vegetables, 
including studies of commercial plant operations, and visits to food processing plants. 

Mr. Hoover 



Courses for Graduates Only 

FS 601 Seminar in Food Science 1 (1-0) f s 

Preparation and presentation of scientific papers, progress reports of research and special 
topics of interest in foods. Graduate Staff 

FS 602 Special Research Problems in Food Science Credits by arrangement 

Directed research in a specialized phase of food science designed to provide experience in 
research methodology and philosophy. Graduate Staff 

FS 603 Research in Food Science Credits by orrongement 

Original research preparatory to the thesis for the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. Graduate Staff 



Forestry 315 

Forestry 

Courses for Undergraduates 

FOR 52 Small Private Forest Management 3 (2-3) s 

Growing, harvesting and marketing timber products under small private ownership conditions. 
For Agricultural Institute students. Mr. Dyson 

FOR 101 Introduction to Forestry 1 (l.Q) f 

The profession of forestry, its scope and opportunities; conservation of natural resources. 

Mr. Preston 

FOR 201 Wood Structure and Properties 3 (2-3) s 

Identification, structure, properties and uses of woods of economic importance in the United 
States. This course is a condensation of FOR 202, 203 with less emphasis. Mr. Carter 

FOR 202 Wood Structure and Properties I 3 (I.4) f 

The macro- and micro-structure of wood is emphasized in this introductory course. As related 
to wood structure, the physical properties and uses of several commercially important coni- 
ferous and deciduous woods are also studied. The techniques of hand lens and microscope 
identification of wood are covered. Mr. Thomas 

FOR 203 Wood Structure and Properties II 3 (2-3) g 

Prerequisites: FOR 202, PY 211 

Physical properties of wood, specific gravity relationships, wood in relation to moisture, wood 
in relation to heat, sound, light, electricity, combustion; introduction to strength properties 
of wood. Mr. Rice 

FOR s204 Silviculture 3 credits 

Sophomore Summer Camp 

Growth and development of forest stands; reproduction counts, type mapping thinning, and 

weeding; establishment and measurement of sample plots. Sta£E 

FOR s205 Wood Machining Praeticum 1 credit 

Sophomore Summer Praeticum 

Prerequisite: FOR 203 

Laboratory exercises in machining of wood. Staff 

FOR s206 Wood Drying Praeticum 1 credit 

Sophomore Summer Praeticum 

Laboratory exercises in wood drying. Staff 

FOR s207 Gluing Praeticum 1 credit 

Sophomore Summer Praeticum 

Laboratory exercises in gluing wood and preparation of particle board. Staff 

FOR s208 Wood Finishing Praeticum 1 credit 

Sophomore Summer Praeticum 

Laboratory exercises in wood finishing. Staff 

FOR s209 Plant Inspections 1 credit 

Sophomore Summer Praeticum 

Inspection of wood-using plants. Staff 

FOR s210 Mensuration Praeticum 2 credits 

Sophomore Summer Praeticum 

Laboratory exercises in mensuration. Staff 



316 The General Catalog 

FOR s21 1 Logging and Milling Praeticum 2 credits 

Sophomore Summer Praeticum 

Practical exercises in logging and milling. StafE 

FOR s212 Graphic Methods 1 credit 

Sophomore Summer Praeticum 

Laboratory exercises in appropriate graphic methods. Staff 

FOR 219 Forest Economy and Its Operation 3 (2-2) s 

Multiple use concept of forestry; economic principles underlying production; investment prob- 
lems; factors which influence demand for forest products. Mr. Dyson 

FOR s264 Protection 3 credits 

Sophomore Summer Camp 

Protection practices relating to fire, insects and disease. Staff 

FOR s274 Mapping and Mensuration 3 credits 

Sophomore Summer Camp 

Collection of field data for stand and yield tables, stem analysis, timber surveys, basic men- 
suration, forest mapping. Staff 

FOR s284 Utilization 1 credit 

Sophomore Summer Camp 

Trips to wood industries; expositions on manufacturing processes. 

FOR 301 Wood Processes I 4 (3-2) f 

Prerequisites: FOR 203, 209 

The processes of drying, gluing and finishing wood. Processes of reconstituting wood as fiver- 
board, hardboard and particle board. Basic requirements of various procedures and materials. 
Factors in selecting production methods. Mr. Carter 

FOR 302 Wood Processes 11 4 (3-2) s 

Prerequisites: FOR 203, 209 

The theories and techniques of converting raw wood into usable products by milling, veneer- 
ing and chipping round wood. Included also is the processing of finished lumber, dimension 
stock, plywood and other wood products. Mr. Carter 

FOR 321, 322 Pulp and Paper Technology 3 (3-0) f s 

Brief survey of the physical and chemical characteristics of wood and cellulose. Chemistry 
and technology of the major mechanical, chemical and semi-chemical processes employed in 
the manufacture of pulp and paper. Mr. Hitchings 

FOR 342 Fiber Analysis 3 (1-4) s 

Fiber microscopy; the determination of fiber measurement, quality, variation and identity in 
pulpwood. Mr. Barefoot 

FOR 361, 362 Silvics 3 (2-3) f s 
Prerequisite: Summer Camp 

Site, soil and other environmental factors in relation to the establishment, growth, and de- 
velopment of seedlings, trees and timber stands; the influence of forest vegetation on site, 
ground water, and micro-climate. Messrs. Maki, Perry 

FOR 372 Mensuration 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: FOR s274 

The measurement of timber, both standing and felled; log rules form factors, stem analysis; 
and growth; methods of making volume, growth, and stand tables; increment and yield studies; 
development of stand and yield tables from field data. Mr. Bryant 

FOR 401 Wood Preservation 2 (1-3) s 

Factors causing wood deterioration; preservative materials and treatments; wood by-products 
from mill and forest waste. Mr. Carter 



Forestry 3 1 7 

FOR 403 Paper Process Analysis 3 (0-6) a 

Manufacture of several types of papers with particular attention to stock preparation, sizing, 
filling and coloring. The finished products are tested physically and chemically and evaluated 
from the standpoint of quality and in comparison with the commercial products they are 
intended to duplicate. Mr. Hitchings 

FOR 404 Management Analysis 3 (1-6) s 

Application of management, logging, silvicultural and utilization practices on assigned areas. 
Each student must make a forest survey of an individual area and submit a record. 

Messrs. Lammi, Miller 

FOR 405 Forest Inventory 3 (1-6) t 

Timber estimating and data compilation. Messrs. Lammi, Miller 

FOR 411, 412 Pulp and Paper Unit Processes 3 (3-0) f s 

Principles of operation, construction and design of process equipment employed in the pulp 
and paper industry. Mr. Cook 

FOR 413 Paper Properties and Additives 4 (1-9) f 

Physical, chemical and microscopical examination of experimental and commercial papers 
and evaluation of the results in terms of the utility of the product tested; evaluation and 
identification of dyestuffs and the development of color formulas. 

Messrs. Cook, Landes 

FOR 422 Forest Products 3 (3-0) f 
Prerequisites: FOR 201, CH 203 or 426 

The source and method of obtaining derived and manufactured forest products other than 

lumber. Mr. Carter 

FOR 423 Logging and Milling 3 (2-3) f 

Timber harvesting and transportation methods, equipment and costs; safety and supervision; 
manufacturing methods with; log and lumber grades. Mr. Barefoot 

FOR 432 Merchandising Forest Products 2 (2-0) f 

Principles and practices in the distribution and marketing of the products obtained from 
wood; organization and operation of retail, concentration and wholesale outlets. 

Mr. Carter 

FOR 434 Wood Operations I 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: FOR 301, 302 

Organization of manufacturing plans producing wood products including company organi- 
zation, plant layout, production planning and control. Analysis of typical manufacturing 
operations in terms of processes, equipment, size and product specification. The organization 
and operation of Wood Products markets. Mr. Barefoot 

FOR 435 Wood Operations II 3 (2-3) a 

Prerequisites: FOR 301, 302 

The application of the techniques of operations analysis to management decision making in 
the wood products field. Choice of products to manufacture. Allocation of production resources. 
Development of product distribution systems. Mr. Barefoot 

FOR 441 Design of Wood Structures 3 (2-3) a 

Prerequisite: EM 341 

Strength and related properties of commercial woods; standard A.S.T.M. strength tests; tough- 
ness; timber fastening; design of columns; simple, laminated and box beams; trusses and 
arches. Mr. Thomas 

FOR 444 Introduction to Quality Control 3 (2-3) a 
Prerequisite: ST 361 

A study of methods used to control quality of manufactured wood products. Control charts 

for variable and attributes. Acceptance sampling techniques. Mr. Barefoot 



318 The General Catalog 

FOR 461 Paper Converting 1 (1-0) s 

A survey of the principal processes by which paper and paper board are fabricated into the 
utilitarian products of everyday use. Mr. Landes 

FOR 462 Artificial Forestation 2 (1-3) s 

Production collection, extraction, and storage of forest tree seeds; nursery practice; field 
methods of planting. Mr. Maki 

FOR 463 Plant Inspections 1 (0-3) s 

One week inspection trips covering representative manufactures of pulp and paper and 
paper-making equipment. Staff 

FOR 471 Pulping Process Analysis 4 (1-9) f 

Preparation and evaluation of the several types of wood pulp. The influence of the various 
pulping and bleaching variables on pulp quality and studied experimentally and these data 
evaluated critically. Mr. Hitchings 

FOR 481 Pulping Processes and Products 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisites: FOR 202, CH 203 or 221 

Fiber manufacturing process and equipment; wall, insulation and container board products; 
manufacture of roofing felts; pulp products manufacturing; resin treated and specialty prod- 
ucts, lignin and wood sugar products. Mr. Landes 

FOR 482 Pulp and Paper Mill Management 2 (2-0) s 

A survey of the economics of the pulp and paper industry is followed by a study of the 
work of the several departments of a paper mill organization and the functions of the execu- 
tives who administer them. Mr. Cook 

FOR 491 Senior Problems Credits arranged 

Problems selected with faculty approval in the areas of management or technology. 

Staff 

FOR 492 Senior Problems Credits arranged 

Problems selected with faculty approval in the areas of management or technology. 

Staff 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

FOR 501 Forest Valuation 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: FOR 372 

The theory and techniques of valuation of forest land, timber stands, and forest practices 
as investments and for appraisals of damage. Risks and hazards in forestry as they apply 
to forest investments, forest insurance, and forest taxation. Mr. Bryant 

FOR 511 Silviculture 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: FOR 361, BO 421 

The principle and application of intermediate and reproductive methods of cutting; con- 
trolled burning, silvicides and other methods of hardwood control. The application of silvi- 
cultural methods in the forests of the United States. Mr. Miller 

FOR 512 Forest Economics 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: FOR 372, EC 201 

Economics and social value of forests; supply of, and demands for forest products; land 

use; forestry as a private and a public enterprise; economics of the forest industries. 

Mr. Lammi 

FOR 513 Tropical Woods 2 (1-3) s 

Prerequisites: FOR 203, 301 

Structure, identification, properties, characteristics and use of tropical woods, especially those 

used in plywood and furniture. Mr. Barefoot 



Forestry 319 

FOR 521, 522 Chemistry of Wood and Wood Products 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisites: FOR 202, CH 215. 426, PY 212 

Fundamental chemistry and physics of wood and wood components; pulping principles; electri- 
cal and thermal properties. Mr. Stamm 

FOR 531 Forest Management 3 (2-3) f 
Prerequisite: FOR 372; Corequisite: FOR 511 

Management of timber lands for economic returns; the normal forest taken as the ideal; the 

application of regulation methods to the forest. Mr. Bryant 

FOR 532 Forest Management 3 (3-0) s 

Continuation of FOR 531 

FOR 533 Advanced Wood Structure ond Identification 2 (1-3) f 

Prerequisite: FOR 202 

Advanced microscopic identification of the commercial woods of the United States and some 

tropical woods; microscopic anatomical features and laboratory techniques. 

Mr. Barefoot 

FOR 553 Forest Photogrommetry 2 (1-3) s 
Prerequisites: FOR 372, 531 

Interpretation of aerial photographs, determination of density of timber stands and area 

mapping. Mr. Bryant 

FOR 571 Advanced Forest Mensuration 3 (2-2) f 
Prerequisites: ST 311, FOR 372 

Study of cyclical variation in growth of individual trees and stands; analysis of stand struc- 
tures in even-aged versus all-age stands; general concepts of growing stock levels on yields; 
evaluation of growth prediction methods. Mr. Bryant 

FOR 572 Forest Policy 3 (3-0) f 
Prerequisites: EC 201, FOR 219; Corequisite: FOR 531 

Analysis of the forest policies of the United States and selected foreign countries; criteria for 

their evaluation; appraisal of current policies and alternatives. Mr. Lammi 

FOR 573 Methods of Research in Forestry Credits arranged 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing 

Research procedures, problem outlines, presentation of results; consideration of selected 

studies by forest research organizations; sample plot technique. 

Staff 

FOR 591 Forestry Problems Credits arranged 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing 

Assigned or selected problems in the field of silviculture, logging, lumber manufacturing, pulp 

technology, or forest management. Staff 



Courses for Graduates Only 

FOR 601 Advanced Forest Management Problems Credits arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Directed studies in forest management. Graduate Staff 

FOR 603 Technology of Wood Adhesives 3 (3-0) f or s 

Prerequisites: CH 425, 426; FOR 433 

The fundamentals of adhesives as applied to wood-to-wood and wood-to-metal bonding. Tech- 
nology of adhesives. Preparation and use of organic adhesives. Testing of adhesives and evalua- 
tion of quality of adhesives and bonded joints. Mr. Hart 



320 



The General Catalog 



FOR 604 Timber Physics 3 (3-0) # or s 

Prerequisite: FOR 441 

Density, specific gravity and moisture content variation affecting physical properties; physics 
of drying at high and low temperatures; thermal, sound, light and electrical properties of 
wood. Messrs. EUwood, Hart 



FOR 605 Design and Control of Wood Processes 

Prerequisite: FOR 604 

Design and operational control of equipment for processing wood. 



3 (3-0) f or t 
Mr. EUwood 



FOR 606 Wood Process Analysis 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: FOR 5)2, 604 

Analysis of wood processes through the solution of comprehensive problems involving the 

physics of temperature and moisture relations. Mr. EUwood 



FOR 607 Advanced Quolity Control 

Prerequisites: FOR 606, ST 515 

Advanced statistical quality control as applied to wood processing. 



3 (3-0) s 
Mr. Hart 



FOR 611 Forest Genetics 3 (3-0) f or » 

Prerequisites: GN 411 and permission of instructor 

Application of genetic principles to silviculture, management and pulp utilization. Emphasis 
is on variations in wild populations, on the bases for selection of desirable qualities and on 
fundamentals of controlled breeding. Mr. Zobel 



FOR 621 Advanced Wood Technology Problems 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Specific forestry problems that will furnish material for a thesis. 



Credits arranged 

Graduate Staff 



FOR 671 Problems in Research 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Specific forestry problems that will furnish material for a thesis. 



Credits arranged 

Graduate Staff 



FOR 681 Graduate Seminar 1 (1-0) f or » 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Forestry or closely allied fields 

Presentation and discussion of progress reports on research, special problems and outstanding 

publications in forestry and related fields. Graduate Staff 



Genetics 



Courses for Undergraduates 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 3 (3-0) f » 

Fundamental principles of genetics will be presented at a level not requiring prerequisite 
courses in biological sciences but sufficient for an understanding of the relation of genetics 
to society and technology. A survey will be given of current knowledge of inheritance of 
human traits. Mr. Bostian 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 



GN 41 1 The Principles of Genetics 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisites: BO 103, ZO 103 

An introductory course. The physical basis of inheritance; genes as units of heredity and de- 
velopment; qualitative and quantitative aspects of genetic variation. Mr. Bostiait. 



Genetics 321 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

GN 503 (ANS 503) Genetic Improvement of Livestock 3 (2-3) f s 

GN 512 Genetics 4 (3-2) f 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

Intended for students desiring more thorough and detailed training in fundamental genetics 
with some attention to physiological aspects. (Students conduct individual laboratory prob- 
lems.) Mr. Grosch 

GN 513 Cytogenetics I 4 (3-2) f 

Prerequisite: GN 512 or with consent of instructor 

The chromosomes as vehicles of heredity. Mitosis and meiosis as bases of genetic stability and 
recombination. Structural and numerical aberrations and their effect upon the breeding systems 
of plants and animals. Interspecific hybrids and polyploids. Lectures and laboratory. 

Mr. Gerstcl 

GN 520 (PO 520) Poultry Breeding 3 (3-0) f 

GN 532 Biological Effects of Radiation 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 or with consent of instructor 

Qualitative and quantitative effects of radiations (other than the visible spectrum) on biologi- 
cal systems, to include both morphological and physiological aspects in a consideration of 
genetics, cytology, histology, and morphogenesis. Mr. Grosch 

GN 540 Evolution 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

The facts and theories of evolution in plants and animals. The causes and consequences of 
organic diversity. 
(Offered in 1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Smith 

GN 541 (CS 541, HS 541) Plant Breeding Methods 

Prerequisites: GN 512. and either ST 511 or consent of instructor 

Principles and methods of plant breeding. Staff 

GN 542 (CS 542 or HS 542) Plant Breeding Field Procedures 2 (0-4) 

Summer session 

GN 550 Experimental Evolution 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: GN 512 and either GN 513 or consent of instructor 

Experimental evolution deals primarily with micro-evolutionary processes examined at the 
inter- and intra-specific population level. A review of the results from experimental popula- 
tion studies and analyses of natural populations concerning variation patterns and adaptation, 
natural selection, polymorphism, introgression, population breeding structure, isolating mech- 
anism, etc., is made and interpreted in relation to Neo-Darwinian concepts of the origin of 
species. 
(Offered in 1963-64 and alternate years.) Mr. Mettler 

Courses for Graduates Only 

GN 602 (ANS 602) Population Genetics in Animal Improvement 3 (3-0) f 

GN 607 (PP 607) Genetics of Fungi 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: GN 513 or graduate standing in Botany and Zoology 

Review of major contributions in fungus genetics with emphasis on principles and theories 

that have evolved in recent developments. 

(Offered in 1962-63 and alternate years.) Mr. Nelson 

GN 611 (FOR 611) Forest Genetics 3 (3-0) f s 



322 The General Catalog 

GN 614 Cytogenetics II 3 (0-6) s 

Prerequisite: GN 513 or consent of instructor 

Laboratory and discussion. The cytogenetic analysis of natural and experimental material, 
plant and animal. Assigned exercises and student projects. The course provides the student 
with a working knowledge of cytogenetic procedure. 
(Offered in 1963-64 and alternate years.) Mr. Smith 

GN 626 (ST 626) Statistical Concepts in Genetics 3 (3-0) s 

GN 631 Mathematical Genetics 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: GN 512 and ST 511 or consent of instructor 

History of mathematical biology, role of mathematical concepts in the development of genetic 

science, theory of genetic recombination, dynamics of genetic population. 

(Offered in 1963-64 and alternate years.) Mr. Kojima 

GN 633 Physiological Genetics 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: GN 512 

Recent advances in physiological genetics. Attention will be directed to literature on the 
nature and action of genes, and to the interaction of heredity and environoment in the expres- 
sion of the characteristics of organisms. Mr. Grosch 

GN 641 Colloquium in Genetics 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor 

Informal group discussion of prepared topics assigned by instructor. Graduate Staff 

GN 651 Seminar 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

GN 661 Research Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Original research related to the student's thesis problem. A maximum of six credits for the 

master's degree; by arrangement for the doctorate. Graduate Staff 

GN 671 Special Problems in Genetics 1 to 3 f s 

Prerequisites: Advanced graduate standing and consent of instructor 

Special topics designed for additional experience and research training. Graduate Staff 



Geological Engineering 

Courses for Undergraduates 

MIG 101 Earth Science 3 (3-0) i 

Elective. Not to be taken after MIG 120 

Introductory course in General Geology; changes in the earth, and underlying physical and 

life processes. 

MIG 120 Physical Geology 3 (2-3) f s 

Dynamic processes acting on and within the earth; materials and makeup of the earth's 

crust; emphasis on engineering and agricultural applications in the southeast. Lectures, labora- 
tories and field trips. 

MIG 220 Physical-Historical Geology 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: CH 101 

A broad introductory survey of earth materials, processes, and history. Common minerals 
and rocks. Effect of solar, gravitational, chemical, and internal thermal energy in transform- 
ing crustal constitution, structure, position, and surface form. Measurement and subdivision 
of geologic time. The time scale. Geosynclinal and tectonic cycles. Typical major geologic 
events in North America. Evolution of the main fossil groups. 



Genetics 323 

MIG 222 Historical Geology 3 (2-3) ff 

Prerequisite: MIG 120 

Chronologic account of the geological events during the development of the earth's crust, 
mainly in North America. Evolution and environmental significance of the principal fossil 
animal and plant groups. 

MIG 323 Paleontology 3 (2-3) f • 

Prerequisite: MIG 220 or 222 

Study of fossil life forms, with major emphasis on classification and structure of the inverte- 
brate animals and their application to problems of correlation of strata. Lectures, laboratories 
and field trips. 

MIG 331 Crystallography and Optical Microscopy 4 (2-4) f 

Prerequisites: CH 103 and PY 202 

The crystalline state, elements of morphologic crystallography, space lattice structure, and 
crystal chemistry. Cr^'stal symmetry, systems, classes, and common forms. Atomic and ionic 
packing, coordination number, polymorphism, isomorphism, twinning, zoning, exsolution and 
replacement effects. Techniques and underlying optical theory for identifying minerals with 
the polarizing microscope. Determination of index of refraction and birefringence; isotropic, 
uniaxial, or biaxial character; optic angle, sign, and orientation. Adjunct apparatus for statis- 
tical and petrographic studies. 

MIG 351 Tectonic Structures 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: MIG 220 

Application of the principles of mechanics to an understanding of rock deformation. Analysis 
of fracture, solid flow, and fluid flow structures imposed on igneous, sedimentary and 
metamorphic rock masses by internal crustal forces and gravitiational movements. Stress- 
strain relations of rocks and minerals under surface conditions, and the modification of be- 
havior which result from pore solutions and increase of confining pressure, temperature, and 
time. 

MIG 415 Mineral Exploration and Evaluation 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: MIG 440, MIG 452 

Application of the principles of geology, geophysics, and geochemistry to the discovery and 
evaluation of mineral deposits. Design of mineral exploration and development programs 
based on knowledge of the unique thermodynamic, geochemical, and tectonic features that 
control mineral formation and concentrations in well known mining districts, especially those 
yielding ferrous, base, and precious metals. Review of economic and technological factors 
governing the value of mineral deposits. 

MIG 440 Endogenic Materials and Processes 4 (3-3) ■ 

Prerequisites: MIG 220, MIG 331 

Minerals, rocks, and mineral deposits that are formed at high temperatures and pressures by 
crystallization or solidification of molten magma, or by solid state recrystallization of older 
rocks. Application of principles of thermodynamics and of phase-rule chemistry, and the 
results of modern high pressure-temperature laboratory research on the stability fields of 
crystalline phases, to an understanding of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Identification, 
classification, occurrence, origin, and economic value of the principal igneous and metamor- 
phic rocks. 

MIG 452 Exogenic Materials and Processes 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisites: MIG 220, MIG 331 

Identification, classification, geologic occurrence, origin, and economic value of minerals, rocks, 
and mineral deposits formed by physical, chemical, and biological processes at low tempera- 
tures and pressures at and near the earth's surface. Hydrodynamics of sediment transport 
and deposition, settling velocities and size sorting, chemical and biochemical precipitation 
from aqueous solutions. Principles of division of stratified terranes into natural units, cor- 
relation of strata, identification of depositional environments, and facies analysis. 

MIG 461 Engineering Geology 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MIG 120 or 220 

The application of geologic principles to engineering practice; analysis of geologic factors 

and processes affecting specific engineering projects. 



324 The General Catalog 

MIG 462 Geological Surveying 3 (1-6) a 

Prerequisites: MIG 351, MIG 440, MIG 452 

Methods of field observation and use of geologic surveying instruments in surface and under- 
ground work; representation of geologic features by maps, sections and diagrams. Lectures, 
laboratories and field work. 

MIG 465 Geological Field Procedures 6 Summer 

Prerequisite: MIG 351 or special permission 

A six week summer field course. Practical field procedures and instruments commonly used 
to procure geologic data for evaluating mineral deposits, solving engineering problems in- 
volving earth materials, and drawing scientific conclusions. Observation of geologic phenomena 
in their natural setting. Large and intermediate scale geologic mapping of surface features 
and large scale mapping underground in mine workings. 

MIG 472 Elements of Mining Engineering 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: MIG 220 and at least Junior standing in Geological Engineering 
Introduction to mining; surface and underground methods of development and production; 
explosives, drilling and blasting; ore loading, transport, and hoisting; drainage and ventila- 
tion; mine surveying and sampling; fire assaying; mining law, organization, administration, 
and safety. Lectures, laboratory and field inspections. 

MIG 481, 482 Senior Seminar 1 (1-0) f s 

Reports and discussion of current professional topics. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MIG 522 Petroleum Geology 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: MIG 330, PY 202 

Properties, origin and modes of occurrence of petroleum and natural gas. Geologic and eco- 
nomic features of the principal oil and gas fields, mainly in the United States. 

Mr. Lcith 

MIG 552 Exploratory Geophysics 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: MIG 351, PY 202 

Fundamental principles underlying all geophysical methods; procedure and instruments in- 
volved in gravitational, magnetic, seismic, electrical, and other methods of studying geologi- 
cal structures and conditions. Spontaneous potential, resistivity, radioactivity, temperature, 
and other geophysical logging methods. Study of applications and interpretations of results. 

Mr. Leith 

MIG 571, 572 Mining end Mineral Dressing 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIG 472 

Principles of the mineral industry; mining laws, prospecting, sampling, development, drilling, 
blasting, handling, ventilation and safety; administration; surveying, assaying; preparation, 
beneficiation and marketing. StaflE 

MIG 581 Geomorphology 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: MIG 452 

A systematic study of land forms and their relations to processes, stages of development, and 
adjustment to underlying structure. Lectures, map interpretations, and field trips. 

Mr. Brown 



Courses for Graduates Only 

MIG 611, 612 Advanced Economic Geology 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: MIG 440 and 452 

Detailed study of the origin and occurrence of specific mineral deposits. Regional correlations. 

Graduate Staff 



History and Political Science 325 

MIG 632 Microscopic Determination of Opaque Minerals 3 (0-6) i 
Prerequisite: MIG 331 

Identification of metallic, opaque minerals in polished sections by physical properties, etch 

reactions and microchemical tests. Laboratories. Mr. Brown 

MIG 642 Advanced Petrography 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisites: MIG 331 and 440 

Application of the petrographic microscope to the systematic study of the composition and 

origin of rocks; emphasis on igneous and metamorphic rocks. Mr. Parker 

MIG 681, 682 Seminar 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Scientific articles, progress reports and special problems of interest to geologists and geologi- 
cal engineers discussed. Graduate StaflF 

MIG 691 Geological Research 3 or 6 

Prerequisite: Permission of tlie instructor 

Lectures, reading assignments, and reports; special work in Geology to meet the needs and 

interests of the students. Thesis problems. Graduate StaflE 



History and Political Science 

Courses in History for Undergraduates 

HI 201 The Ancient World 2 (2-0) f 

A history of ancient times from the rise of civilization in Egypt and Babylonia to the decline 
of Rome in the fifth century. Emphasis is placed upon the evolution of cultures and civili- 
zations, and upon the development of art, science, literature, and philosophy. 

HI 202 The Medieval World 2 (2-0) t 

The political, economic, social and cultural developments from the decline of the Roman 
Empire in the West to the emergence of the modem period. 

HI 205 The Modern Western World 3 (3-0) f • 

A history of major movements in the Western World from the Renaissance to the present. 

Hi 225, 226 Modern Europe 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of political, economic, social, intellectual, and international movements in Europe 
from the end of the Middle Ages to the present, with an introduction covering the medieval 
period. The course divides at 1789. The semesters may be taken separately. 

HI 245, 246 History of European Civilization 3 (3-0) f s 

A history of European civilization from the Golden Age of Greece to the present. Those social, 
political, and economic currents most influential in the formation of modern society are 
interwoven through the principal periods of cultural expression. 

HI 251 The United States Through Reconstruction 3 (3-0) f 

A study of major historical developments in tlie growth of the American nation through the 
political phases of the Reconstruction period following the Civil War. 

HI 252 The United States Since Reconstruction 3 (3-0) f t 

A study of major historical developments in the growth of the American nation beginning with 
economic and social phases of the Reconstruction period following the Civil War. 

HI 261 The United States in Western Civilization 3 (3-0) f t 

An analysis of major developments in American history, with American history considered as 
part of the historical development of modern western civilization. 



326 The General Catalog 

HI 301, 302 American Economic History 3 (3-0) f s 

A history of economic institutions and customs in the United States from the time of the 
transfer to the New World of European economic customs to the present. The course divides at 
1860. The semesters may be taken separately. 

HI 306 North Carolina History 2 (2-0) s 

The political, social and economic developments of North Carolina from colonial beginnings to 

the present. 

HI 321 Internationol Relations Since 1870 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: HI 205 or an acceptable substitute 

A study of the relations between the major countries of the world since 1870. In addition to the 
history of actual diplomatic relations, crises and settlements, attention is given to the causes 
of the various international crises. The course also includes study of the development of interna- 
tional organizations and the various points of conflict between international law and organiza- 
tion and the sovereignty of independent governments. 

HI 351 British History 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the political, social, economic, and cultural past of the British Isles from Roman 
times to the present. Emphasis is placed on the position of Britain in Europe, her colonial 
expansion, and on the connection between British and early American history. 

HI 375 Latin America 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: HI 205 or HI 252 or an acceptable substitute. 

A study of the main currents of Latin American development from 1492 to the present day. 
The histories of leading countries including Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, and Mexico will 
be emphasized to show political, economic, and social trends as experienced during the conquest, 
colonization and independence, and, especially, the national period since 1830. 

HI 401 Russian History 3 (3-0) f 

This course presents the major trends in Russian social, political, economic, and cultural his- 
tory, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. USSR policy is studied in re- 
lation to the full sweep of Russian history. 

HI 402 Asia and the West 3 (3-0) s 

A history of Asia from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, with emphasis on Asian 
nationalism and conflict with the imperial powers. 

HI 409 Colonial America 2 (2-0) f 

A study of the development of the American colonies in the seventeenth and eighteenth cen- 
turies, with special emphasis on European backgrounds. 

HI 411 The American Revolution and the Confederation 3 (3-0) f 

The historical steps in the establishment of the United States as an independent nation. The 
conflict with Great Britain after 1763 leading to the declaring of independence; the military 
and diplomatic aspects of the war for American independence; the peace negotiations and 
the peace settlement of 1783; the domestic problems and foreign relations in the immediate 
post-war years; the establishment of government in the new nation terminating with the 
adoption of the Constitution of 1787. 

HI 412 Recent United States History 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the main currents in American political, economic, social, and diplomatic history of 
the twentieth century. 

HI 422 History of Science 3 (3-0) s 

A study of the evolution of science from antiquity to the present with particular attention given 
to the impact of the scientific thought upon selected aspects of western civilization. The 
course provides a broad perspective of scientific progress and shows the interrelationship of 
science and major historical developments. 



History and Political Science 327 

HI 433 American Agricultural History 3 (3-0) f 

Historical developments of agricultural activity in the United States from the transfer of 
western European agriculture to America to the present, with particular emphasis on the 
historical place and importance of agriculture in American life. 

HI 461 The Soviet Union (Same as EC, PS 461) 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: One semester of Economics and PS 201 or HI 205 or acceptable substitute 
An analysis of the structure and function of the major Soviet economic, political and social 
institutions with special stress on the historical roots and continuity of Russian civilization. 
The course is presented in three equal phases of approximately five weeks each, covering 
Russian history, Soviet government, and Soviet economy. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

HI 534 (Same as RS 534) Farmers' Movements 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Three credits in American history, American government, sociology or a related 

social science 
A history of agricultural organizations and movements in the United States and Canada prin- 
cipally since 1865, emphasizing the Grange, the Farmers' Alliance, the Populist revolt, the Far- 
mer's Union, the Farm Bureau, the Equity societies, the Nonpartisan League, cooperative mar- 
keting, government programs and present problems. Mr. Noblin 

Courses in Political Science for Undergraduates 

PS 201 The American Governmental System 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the American federal system, integrating national and state government, with em- 
phasis on constitutional principles, major governmental organs, governmental functions, and 
the politics and machinery of elections. Some attention is given to other types of political 
systems, and comparisons are made where relevant throughout the course. 

PS 202 County and Municipol Government 3 (3-0) f s 

A survey of the organization and functions of the diverse rural and urban governments in 
the United States, emphasizing current problems and attempts to solve them. 

PS 301 Comparative Political Systems 3 (3-0) f 

An analytical study of the federal and unitary systems and the presidential, parliamentary, 
and authoritarian plans of government, with special attention to the governments of the 
United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, and the Soviet Union. 

PS 322 Contemporary World Polities 3 (3-ff) f • 

A study of the pattern of international life, the instruments of national policy, the controls 
upon international behavior, and the major problems in international relations since World 
War II, including the development of the United Nations and various regional arrangemenU. 
Attention is given to the national interests and foreign policies of the states belonging to the 
Western and Soviet blocs, with emphasis on the position of the United States. 

PS 376 Lotin American Government and Politics 3 (3-0) s 

An analysis of Latin American governmental structures, political parties and ideologies, with 
emphasis on the period since 1910 in Mexico, Cuba, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Peru, 
and Venezuela. Agrarian reform, social revolution, nationalism, and relations with the United 
States will be stressed within the Latin American political context. 

PS 401 American Parties ond Pressure Groups 3 (3-0) f • 

After a brief survey of those features of American government essential to an understanding 
of the political process, the course proceeds to examine the American electorate and public 
opinion and devotes its major attention to the nature, organization, and programs of pressure 
groups and political parties and to their efforts to direct opinion, gain control of government, 
and shape public policy. Special attention is given to party organization and pressure group 
activity at the governmental level and to recent proposals to improve the political party as an 
instrument of responsible government. 



328 The General Catalog 

PS 406 Problems in State Government 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or an accepiable substitute. 

Selected problems arising from the operation of legislative, administrative, and judicial 
machinery. In addition to acquiring a comprehensive view of these problems each student will 
make an intensive study of a special phase of one of them. Special attention will be given to 
North Carolina. 

PS 431 Internotionol Organizotion 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or HI 205 or an acceptable substitute 

A study of the evolving machinery and techniques of international organization in the present 
century with particular emphasis on recent developments. The actual operation of international 
organization will be illustrated by the study of selected cuiTent international problems. 

PS 452 The Legislative Process 3 (3-0) s 

A study of the formulation of public policy from the institutional and behavioral viewpoints. 
Important current legislative problems at the congressional and state legislative levels will be 
selected and will serve as a basis for analyzing the legislative process. 

PS 461 (Same as EC, HI 461) The Soviet Union 3 (3-0) ff 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PS 501 Modern Political Theory 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or HI 205 or an acceptable substitute. 

A study of the state and its relationship to individuals and groups, approached through the 
reading of selected passages from the works of outstanding philosophers from the sixteenth 
century to the present. Mr. Holtzman 

PS 502 Public Administration 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or PS 202 or an acceptable substitute 

A study of the principles and problems of administration in a democracy, including such mat- 
ters as organization, personnel, fiscal management, relationship to the legislative and judicial 
functions, control of administrative agencies and policies and public relations. 

Mr. Block 

PS 510 (Same as EC 510) Public Finance 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

A survey of the theories and practices of governmental taxing, spending, and borrowing, in- 
cluding intergovernmental relationships and administrative practices and problems. 

Mr. Block 

PS 512 American Constitutional Theory 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or an acceptable substitute 

Basic constitutional doctrines, including fundamental law, judicial review, individual rights and 
political privileges, and national and state power. Special attention is given to the application 
of these doctrines to the regulation of business, agriculture, and labor and to the rights safe- 
guarded by the First, Fifth, and Fourteenth Amendments to the Constitution. 

Mr. Edsall 

PS 610 Applied Principles of Public Administration 2-4 by arrangement f 

Prerequisite: PS 502 or an acceptal)le substitute. 

An advanced course in administrative principles and methods. Students will perform individual 
or group research, under supervision, in specific administrative topics within the context 
of those public agencies which function in their respective fields of technology. Mr. Block 

PS 620 Problems in Politicol Science 2-4 by arrangement f 

Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing 

An independent advanced research course in selected problems of government and politics. 
The problems will be chosen in accordance with the needs and desires of the students regis- 
tered for the course. Graduate Staff 



Horticultural Science 329 

Horticultural Science 

Courses for Undergraduates 

HS 201 Principles of Horticulture 3 (3-0) f • 

Attention will be directed to the basic principles involved in the application of these principles 
to the production, processing and utilization of fruit, vegetable, and ornamental corps. Atten- 
tion will also be given to the economic importance and distribution of horticultural enterpriset. 

Mr. Gardner 

HS 211, 212 Ornamental Plants 3 (1-5) f s 
Prerequisite: BO 103 

Distribution, botanical characters and relationships, adaptation and usage of ornamental trees, 

shrubs, vines, and herbaceous plants. Mr. Randall 

HS 301 Plant Propagation 3 (2-2) * 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

A study of principles, methods, and practices in seedage, cuttage, division, budding, grafting, 
and other methods of propagation. Consideration will also be given to scion and stock relation- 
ships and dormancy. Mr. Randall 

HS 342 Landscape Gardening 3 (2-3) f 

The application of the principles of design to the landscaping of small properties and the select- 
ing and planting of trees, shrubs, flowers, and lawn grasses. Students will be required to work 
out detailed landscape plans. Visitations will be made to outstanding homes and gardens. 

Mr. Randall 

HS 411 Nursery Management 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: BO 103 and SSC 200 

The principles and practices involved in the production, management, and marketing of field- 
grown and container-grown nursery plants. Field trips will be taken. 

Messrs. Cannon, Randall 

HS 421 Fruit Production 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: BO 103 and SSC 200 

A studv of identification, adaptation, and methods of production and marketing of the 
principal tree and small fruits. Modern practices as related to selection of sites, nutritional re- 
quirements, management practices, and marketing procedures will be discussed. Mr. Correll 

HS 432 Vegetab!e Production 3 (2-3) > 
Prerequisites: BO 103 and SSC 200 

A study of the origin, importance, distribution, botanical relationships, and principles of 

production and marketing of the major vegetable crops. Mr. Miller 

HS 441 Floriculture I 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: BO 103 and SSC 200 

The scope and importance of the commercial flower industry; the basic principles and prac- 
tices involved in the production and marketing of flowers grown in the greenhouse and in 
the field. Mr. Randall 

HS 442 Floriculture I! 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: BO 103 and SSC 200 

Principles and methods of production of commercial flower crops in the greenhouse and in 
the field, including fertilization, moisture, temperature, and light relationships, insect and 
disease control, and marketing of cut flowers and pot plants. Mr. Randall 

HS 471 Arboriculture 3 (2-3) ■ 

Prerequisites: BO 103 and SSC 200 

A study of the principles and practices in the care and maintenance of ornamental trees and 
shrubs, such as pruning, fertilization, control of insects and diseases, and tree surgery. Field 
trips will be taken. Mr. Cannon 



330 The General Catalog 

HS 481 Breeding of Horticulturol Plants 3 (2-2) f 
Prerequisite: GN 411 

The application of genetic and other biological sciences to the improvement of horticultural 

crops. Messrs. Galletta, Henderson 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

HS 501 Research Principles Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

Investigation of a problem in horticulture under the direction of the instructor. The students 
obtain practice in experimental techniques and procedures, critical review of literature and 
scientific writing. The problem may last one or two semesters. Credits will be determined by 
the nature of the problem, not to exceed a total of 4 hours. Graduate Staff 

HS 541 (GN 541 or CS 541) Plant Breeding Methods 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: GN 512; Recommended: ST 511 

.An advanced study of methods of plant breeding as related to principles and concepts of 

inheritance. Messrs. Haynes, Timothy 

HS 542 (GN 542 or CS 542) Plant Breeding Field Procedures 2 (0-4) s 

Prerequisite: HS 541 or CS 541 or GN 541 In summer sessions 

Laboratory^ and field study of the application of various plant breeding techniques and 

methods used in the improvement of economic plants. Messrs. Harvey, Haynes 

HS 552 Growth of Horticultural Plants 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: BO 421 

A study of the effect of nutrient-elements, water, light, temperature and growth substances on 
horticultural plants. Mr. Schramm 

HS 562 Post-Harvest Physiology 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: BO 421 

A study of chemical and physiological changes that occur during handling, transportation, and 
storage which affect the quality of horticultural crops. Consideration will be given to pre- and 
post-harvest conditions which influence these changes. Messrs. McCombs, Ballinger 

HS 581 Senior Seminor 1 d-O) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in Horticulture 

Presentation of scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems in horti- 
culture and related fields. Mr. Gardner 



Courses for Graduates Only 

HS 621 Methods and Evaluation of Horticultural Research 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Principles and methods of research in the field of horticulture and their application to the 
solution of current problems. Critical study and evaluation of scientific publications. Com- 
pilation, organization, and presentation of data. Mr. Cochran 

HS 641 Research Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Horticulture, consent of chairman 

Original research on specific problems in fruit, vegetable, and ornamental crops. Thesis pre- 
pared should be worthy of publication. A maximum of 6 credits is allowed toward the Mas- 
ter of Science degree; no limitation on credits in doctorate program. Graduate Staff 

HS 651 Seminar 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Presentation of scientific articles and special lectures. Students will be required to present one 

or more papers. Attendance of all graduate students is required. Graduate Staff 



331 



Industrial Arts 

(See Education) 

Industrial Education 

(See Education) 



Industrial Engineering 

Courses for Undergraduates 

IE 201 Industrial Engineering I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

An intensive and integrated study of the factory as a producing unit. History of manufacturing; 
organization structure; analysis of products; establishment and evaluation of processes; motion 
study; plant layout; production planning, scheduling, and control. Course will include solution 
of case problems and plant visits. 

IE 202 Industrial Engineering II 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: IE 201 
Continuation of IE 201 

IE 217 Machine Tools 1 (0-2) f • 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

One session two hours each week consisting of lecture, demonstrations, and student projects. 
Dimensional control, press forming, power cutting of metals including turning, milling, shap- 
ing and finishing. Selection and use of cutting tools, speeds, and feeds. 

IE 218 Metal Forming 1 (0-2) f s 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

One session two hours each week consisting of lecture, demonstrations, and outside assignments. 
Survey of metals, pattern making, foundry practice, die and permanent mold casting, forging, 
gas cutting, gas and arc welding. 

IE 224 Wood Working Equipment 3 (3-0) s 

Classwork covers the description of cutting, sanding and assembly equipment, and an explana- 
tion of the type of operation done by each kind of equipment. The theory of cutting and 
sanding and cutterhead and saw design are covered. 

IE 241 Welding Laboratory 1 (0-3) f t 

Prerequisite: IE 218 or permission of instructor 

A study of mechanization as applied to oxygen cutting, to the various types of shielded metal 
arcs and to gas welding. Jigs, fixtures, and positioners. Selection of welding process. Joint de- 
■ign and welding costs. Welds and stress distribution. 

IE 269 Welding and Pipe Shopwork 1 (0-3) f s 

Fundamentals of welding, both arc and gas, cutting equipment; safety in the use of equipment; 
application of low temperature and non-ferrous alloys; cutting, threading, reaming, and erec- 
tion of iron pipe; copper tubes and fittings in heating and air conditioning work. 

IE 301 Engineering Economy 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Criteria and techniques of engineering economy for management decisions in relation to 
economy of design, economy of selection, and economy of operation. Study of effects of de- 
preciation policies and machine replacement considerations. Emphasis on problem solving 
and development of detailed project economy studies. 



332 The General Catalog 

IE 303 Industrial Engineering III 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite or corequisite: IE 202 

An intensive and integrated course in methods of obtaining maximum effectiveness from the 
human resources used in the factor)'; principles of personnel administration, time study and 
rate setting, job evaluation and wage incentives, principles of control of labor and other costs. 

IE 304 Industrial Engineering IV 4 (3-3) » 

Prerequisite: IE 303 
Continuation of IE 303 

IE 310 Industrial Safety 2 (2-0) f » 

A course in the causes and prevention of industrial accidents. 

IE 322 Furniture Design and Construction 2 (0-6> 

An introduction to furniture drawing and construction. Detailed drawings and bills of ma- 
terial are made by the students from samples and from designers sketches. In construction, 
emphasis is placed upon satisfactory performance under variable atmospheric moisture, upon 
adequate strength and rigidity and upon low cost. 

IE 326 Furniture Manufacture and Processing 4 (3-3) » 

Prerequisite: IE 322; Corequisites: IE 332 or IE 202, FOR 203 

A study of the production methods of the Furniture Industry. Class work includes the pro- 
duction procedures from the yard through the machine, cabinet, finishing, upholstering, and 
shipping departments. The laboratory period is supplemented by visits to furniture plants. 
Particular attention is paid to production rates by departments, based on number of men 
and supervisors, the quality of product produced, and equipment used. 

IE 327 Furniture Marketing 2 (2-0) f 

Study of basic factors bearing on selection of ideal location, equipment, and organization ta 
serve a specific market with a specific factor)'. In addition to lectures, each student will select 
one project for which he will work out a solution for correlating product and market. 

IE 328 Manufacturing Processes 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: IE 217, IE 218 

The basic processes of conversion of raw materials into producer and consumer goods. The 
cost reduction aspects of machine tools, jigs, and fixtures in volume productions. Study of 
industrial trends to meet needs of an expanding economy. Selected problems illustrating a 
wide variety of manufacturing situations. 

IE 332 Motion and Time Study 4 (3-3) f t 

Prerequisite: Junior standing; Corequisite: EC 425 

Principles and techniques of motion and time study, detailed study of charting operator 
movements; micromotion study. Predetermined time data and its applications; stopwatch time 
study with emphasis on rating, allowances and standard data theory and practice. 

IE 334 Motion and Time Study 3 (0-3) f 

A course designed for non-industrial engineering students. Principles and techniques of motion 
and time study. Types and uses of predetermined time systems; stopwatch time study, prin- 
ciples and methods of rating, application of allowances and standard data. 

IE 341 Furniture Plant Layout and Design 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: IE 326 

Problems in industrial plant design with special reference to furniture manufacture; building 
structures, equipment location, space utilization, layout for operation and control; allied topic* 
in power utilization, light, heat, ventilation, and safety. Laboratory period. 

IE 343 Plant Layout and Moterials Handling 4 (3-3) • 

Prerequisites: IE 328, IE 332 

Problems in plant arrangement and layout to obtain most effective utilization of men, materials, 
and machines as related to space and costs. Includes consideration of heat, light, ventilation, 
organization, control, material flow and handling, working conditions, safety, and other factors 
as they affect the most satisfactory layout of the plant. 



Industrial Engineering 333 

IE 346 Furniture Design and Construction 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisite: IE $22 

Lecture and laboratory work on the design and construction of modern and period furniture. 
The course emphasizes construction features that are economical of labor and materials and 
are adaptable to mass production. The course covers the use of new engineering materials and 
their effect on furniture construction. 

IE 350 Mechanisms and Machine Design 3 (2-3) I 

Prerequisites: IE 217, IE 218; Corcquisite: EM MS 

Fundamental principles of stress, strain, deflection of beams, combined stresses and strains, 
shafts, spring, gears, linkages, and cams, with emphasis on applications to jig and fixtures de- 
sign and special tooling. 

IE 401 Industrial Engineering Analysis 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: IE 304. MA 301, MA 405. ST 362 

An introductory course in some of the more recently developed operations research techniques; 
applications of analysis of variance, multiple correlation and other statistical methods, queueing 
theory, linear programming: graphical methods of solutions; information theory and servo- 
mechanisms in Industrial Engineering. A balance will be sought between theory and practical 
applications. 

IE 402 Industrial Engineering Analysis 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: IE 401 
Continuation of IE 401 

IE 404 Introduction to Tool Engineering 3 (2-3) t 

Prerequisites: IE 217, IE 218, EM 343 

The development of effective production process design through a study of theory and 
characteristics of material removal and forming processes; with emphasis on quality require- 
ments of the product, operations study, and the economics of tooling. 

IE 408 Production Control 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Planning, scheduling, and dispatching of production in manufacturing operations; conversion 
of sales requirements into production orders; construction of production budgets and their 
relation to labor, materials and machines; laboratory project involving the development and 
operation of the production control system of a typical plant. 

IE 420 Manufacturing Controls 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: IE 301 

Theory and methodology for developing and maintaining profitable manufacturing operations. 
Development of principles and procedures for control of materials, manpower, and costs. 
Special attention to production and inventory control, equipment utilization, wage classification 
and cost reduction programs. 

IE 425 Soles and Distribution Methods 2 (2-0) • 

An analysis of the distribution of industrial and consumer products; the effect of increased 
productivity on sales and distribution channels; development and marketing of new products, 
merchandising and packaging. Sales training and sales engineering programs. 

IE 430 Job Evaluation ond Wage Administration 3 (2-3) t 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Job analysis, classification and specification. Grading, ranking, factor comparsion and point 
systems of job evaluation in determining equitable rates for job content. Wage surveys and 
merit rating. Utilization of time standards in design, installation, and operation of financial 
incentive plans. Comparison of various wage and salary plans. Effect of wage payment methods 
on industrial relations practices. 



334 The General Catalog 

IE 443 Quality Control 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: ST 361 

Economic balance between cost of quality and value of quality, and techniques for accom- 
plishing this balance. Organization for, specification and utilization of quality controls. Statis- 
tical theory and analyses as applied to sampling, control charts, tolerance determination, ac- 
ceptance procedures and control of production. 

IE 451, 452 Seminar 1 (1-0) f s 

A weekly meeting of senior students to assist the transition from a college environment to 
that of industry. Lectures, problems, presentation of papers, and outside speakers. Employ- 
ment practices and procedures useful in job finding. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

IE 515 Process Engineering 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: IE 401, IE 443 

The technical process of translating product design into a manufacturing program. The appli- 
cation of industrial engineering in the layout, tooling, methods, standards, costs, and control 
functions of manufacturing. Laboratory problems covering producer and consumer products. 

IE 517 Automatic Processes 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisites: IE 401, IE 443 

Principles and methods for automatic processing. The design of product, process, and con- 
trols. Economic, physical, and sociological effects of automation. 

IE 521 Control Systems and Data Processing 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: IE 401 

This course is designed to train the student in the problems and techniques required for syste- 
matic control of the production process and the business enterprise. This includes training in 
the determination of control factors, the collection and recording of data, and the processing, 
evaluation, and use of data. The course will illustrate the applications and use of data 
processing equipment and information machines in industrial processes. Case problems will be 
used extensively. 

IE 531 Quantitative Job Evaluation Methods 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: IE 401 

A study of statistical and mathematical methods of testing and designing job evaluation plans. 
Ranking, contingency, and analysis of variance methods of testing plans and rating per- 
formance. Multiple regression and linear programming methods of designing plans. 

IE 543 Standard Data 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisites: ST 361 or ST 515, one course in motion and time study 

Theory and practice in developing standard data from stopwatch observations and predeter- 
mined time data; methods of calculating standards from data; application of standard data in 
cost control, production planning and scheduling, and wage incentives. 

IE 546 Advanced Quality Control 3 (3-0) s 
Prerequisite: IE 304 or ST 562 

The statistical foundation of Quality Control are emphasized in this course as well as its 

economic implications. Mathematical derivation of most of the formulas used are given. 

Sampling techniques are treated extensively and many applications of this powerful technique 
are explained. 

IE 551 Standard Costs for Manufacturing 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: One course in accounting and one course in motion and time study 
The development, application and use of standard costs as a management tool; use of indus- 
trial engineering techniques in establishing standard costs for labor, material, and overhead. 
Analysis of variances and setting of budgets. Measures of management performance. 



Landscape Architecture 335 

IE 581 Proiect Work 2 to 6 f s 

Investigation and report on an assigned problem for students enrolled in the fifth-year cur- 
riculum in Industrial Engineering. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

IE 621 Inventory Control Methods 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: IE 402. IE 521, MA 511 

A study of inventory policy with respect to reorder sizes, minimum points, and production 
schedules. Simple inventory models with restrictions, price breaks, price changes, analysis of 
slow-moving inventories. Introduction to the smoothing problem in continuous manufacturing. 
Applications of linear and dynamic programming and zero-sum game theory. 

IE 651 Special Studies Industrial Engineering Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

The purpose of this course is to allow individual students or small groups of students to take 
on studies of special areas in Industrial Engineering which fit into their particular program 
and which may not be covered by existing industrial engineering graduate level courses. The 
work would be directed by a qualified staff member who has particular interest in the area 
covered by the problem. Such problems may require individual research and initiative in the 
application of industrial engineering training to new areas or fields. 

IE 671 Seminar 1-1 

Seminar discussion of industrial engineering problems for graduate students. Case analyses 
and reports. 

IE 691 Industrial Engineering Research Credits by arrangement 

Graduate research in Industrial Engineering for thesis credit. 



Infernational Studeni- Orienfafion 

ISO 100 Introduction to the United States 1 credit f 

Required of all International students. 



Landscape Architecture 

Courses for Undergraduates 

LA 301, 302 Landscape Design I, II 5 (3-9) f s 

Prerequisite: ARC 202 

Required of third year students in Landscape Architecture 

The landscape survey, investigation, and analysis. Use of first and second year design principles 
in specific landscape architecture problems. Covers the small scale design section in the com- 
plete third, fourth, and fifth year landscape cycle. Messrs. Moore, Thurlow 

LA 311, 312 Landscape Construction I, II 4 (2-6) f t 

Required of third year students in Landscape Architecture 

The physical elements of landscape design, particularly earthwork, grading, quantities, con- 
struction, horizontal and vertical alignment of roads, and principles of statics. Lecture and 
laboratory work dealing with landscape structural analysis and materials, surface drainage 
and run-off, under-drainage; external lighting, water supply, waste, sanitation treatment, and 
fire protection. Mr. Clarke 



336 The General Catalog 

LA 401, 402 Landscape Design III, IV 6 (3-9) f t 

Prerequisite: LA 302 

Required of studenu in Landscape Architecture 

Regional lurvey investigation and analysis. Site planning and environmental design. Covers 

the medium scale design section in the complete third, fourth, and fifth year design cycle. 

(Ck)rrelation with LA (instruction and LA Planting Design courses.) 

Messrs. Moore, Thurlow 

LA 421, 422 Planting Design 4 (2-6) f t 
Prerequisites: HS 212, LA 302, LA 512 
Required of students in Landscape Architecture 

The appraisal of plants as objects and their orderly arrangement for landscape effect. Tech- 
niques for recording design, specifications, and cost estimates. (Correlation with Landscape 
Design and Landscape Construction courses.) Mr. Moore 

LA 501, 502 Landscape Design V, VI 6,8 (4-8) f s 

Prerequisite: LA 402 

Required of fifth year students in Landscape Architecture 

Large scale landscape design and ecological planning, analysis, and investigation. At least 

one research or thesis project. Messrs. Moore, Thurlow 

LA 511 Londscape Construction III 4 (2-6) f 

Prerequisite: LA 312 

Required of fifth year students in Landscape Architecture 

Landscape structures, materials, and construction from LA 312. Office practice, procedure, 

ethics, and law; contracts, specifications, and bidding. Mr. Thurlow 



Mothemat-ics 

Courses for Undergraduates 

MA 101 Algebra and Trigonometry 5 (4-2) f t 

Algebraic properties of real numbers; algebra of sets, mappings, functions and graphs. Proper- 
ties of the complex number field. Applications to systems of equations both linear and quadra- 
tic. Other topics in algebra including inequalities, variation, binomial theorem, progressions, 
theory of equations and determinants. Trigonometric functions of a general angle, identities 
and multiple angle relations, inverse trigonometric functions, graphs, solution of triangles by 
logarithms and slide rule with emphasis on the laws of sines and cosines. 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and Calculus i 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 101 

Required of freshmen in the Schools of Engineering and Physical Sciences and Applied Mathe- 
matics. The first of three semesters of a unified course in analytic geometry and calculus. 
Topics include rectangular coordinates in the plane, graphs and equations of lines, alge- 
braic curves, including the conic sections and others examined by general discussion 
methods. Also introduced are functions, limits, continuity, diflerentiation of algebraic functions, 
with applications of derivatives and differentials. 

MA 111 Algebra ond Trigonometry 4 (3-2) f s 

Properties of real numbers and basic postulates, algebra of sets, functions and graphs, com- 
plex numbers. Linear and quadratic systems of equations. Inequalities, variation, progressions, 
binomial theorem, theory of equations and determinants. Trigonometric functions, identities, 
slide rule and logarithm solution of right and oblique triangles. 
(Studenu are to take either MA 101 or MA 111, but not both) 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or MA 101 

A unified course, beginning with elementary ideas in analytic geometry and calculus, with 
the introduction of additional work in trigonometry where needed; rectangular and polar 
coordinate systems, fundamental locus problems, lines and conic sections, curve tracing, the 
derivative, with applications to geometry and elementary practical problems. 



Mathematics 337 

MA 122 Mathematics of Finance ond Elementary Statistics 4 (3-2) f t 

Prerequisite: MA 101 or MA 111 

Simple and compound interest, annuities and their applications to amortization and sinking 
fund problems, installment buying, calculation of premiums of life annuities and life insurance, 
elementary statistics. 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry ond Calculus II 4 (3-2) f t 

Prerequisite: MA 102 (with a minimum grade of C) 

Required of sophomores in the Schools of Engineering and Physical Sciences and Applied 
Mathematics. The second of three semesters of a unified course in analytic geometry and cal- 
culus. Topics include indefinite and definite integrals of algebraic functions and their 
applications; differentiation of transcendental functions; polar coordinates, parametric equa- 
tions, curvilinear motion and curvature; formal integration; integration by parts, substitution, 
and partial fractions. 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 4 (3-2) f t 

Prerequisite: MA 201 

Required of sophomores in the Schools of Engineering and Physical Sciences and Applied 
Mathematics. The third of three semesters of a unified course in analytic geometry and cal- 
culus. Topics include areas, volumes, lengths of curves, centroids, moments of inertia 
in rectangular and polar coordinates; approximate integration, improper integrals, indetermi- 
nate forms; infinite series and expansion of functions; solid analytic geometry and partial 
differentiation, multiple integrals in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. 

MA 211, 212 Analytic Geometry and Calculus B, C 3 (2-2) f t 

Prerequisite: MA 112 

An integrated course in the fundamentals of calculus, including formal differentiation and 
integration. Basic applications to geometry, rates, maxima and minima, areas, volumes, first 
and second moments and centroids are included. Additional topics from analytic geometry, not 
covered in MA 112, are introduced as needed as a basis for calculus. 

MA 215 Introduction to Finite Mathematics 3 (3-0) f t 

This course includes the following related topics: Elementarv symbolic logic and truth tables, 
introduction to sets and subsets, other number systems, the partitioning of sets, introduction to 
probability theory and finite Stochastic processes, elementary linear programming and game 
theory. 

MA 301 Differential Equations I 3 (3-0) f « 

Prerequisite: MA 202 

First order equations with variables separable; Euler's method of approximate solution; physical 
and geometrical applications. Linear equations of first order; applications. Linear equations of 
higher order with constant coefficients, solution by repeated linear first order equations, varia- 
tion of parameters, undetermined coefficients, operators. Systems of equations; scaling variables, 
applications to networks and dynamical systems. Introduction to series-solutions; solutions by 
use of analog computer. 

MA 302 Theory of Equations 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 202 

Algebraic equations; isolation of roots, numerical approximations to roots, the Graeffe method; 
application of approximation procedures to transcendental equations; systems of linear equa- 
tions, determinants and introduction to matrix theory. 

MA 303 Differential Equations and Infinite Series 4 (4-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 202 (Superior Student Program) 

Infinite series and Taylor expansions. First order equations with variables separable; Euler's 
method of approximate solution; physical and geometrical applications. Linear equations of 
first order; applications. Linear equations of higher order with constant coefficients, solution 
by repeated linear first order equations, variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients, 
operators. Systems of equations; scaling variables, applications to networks and dynamical 
systems. Introduction to series-solutions; solutions by use of analog computer; non-linear dif- 
ferential equations; dimensional analysis. 
(Students are to take either MA 301 or 303, but not both.) 



338 The General Catalog 

MA 335 Programming for Digital Computers 1 (0-3) f s 

Prerequisites: MA 201 or MA 211 and junior standing 

Programming for digital computers. Construction and use of flow charts, use of a compiler, 
and assembly program and machine language instructions. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

MA 401 intermediate Differential Equations 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 301 

Theory of linear independence of solutions of linear differential equations, variation of para- 
meters, superposition integral, simultaneous linear differential equations by transform methods, 
series solutions, special functions (Bessel, Legendre, etc.), orthogonal functions, and partial 
differential equations by separation of variables. 

MA 403 Fundamental Concepts of Algebra 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or MA 212 

Integers; integral domains; rational numbers; fields, rings, groups. Boolean algebra. 

MA 404 Fundamental Concepts of Geometry 3 (3-0) a 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or MA 212 

Foundations of geometry; laws of logic; affine geometry; geometric transformations; homogeneous 

coordinates; comparison of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. 

MA 405 introduction to Determinants and Matrices 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or MA 212 

Properties of determinants, theorems of Laplace and Jacobi, systems of linear equations. Elemen- 
tary operations with matrices inverse, rank, characteristic roots and eigenvectors. Introduction 
to algebraic forms. 

MA 421 Theory of Probability i 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: MA 301 or consent of department 

Definitions, discrete and continuous sample spaces, combinatorial analysis, Stirling's formula, 
simple occupancy and ordering problems, conditional probability, repeated trials, compound 
experiments, Bayes' theorem, binomial, Poisson and normal distributions, the probability in- 
tegral, random variables, expectation. 

MA 433 History of Mathematics 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or MA 212 

Evolution of the number system; trends in the development of modern mathematics; lives 
and contributions of outstanding mathematicians. 

MA 441 Advanced Calculus 1 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: MA 301 and, preferably, a B-average in all mathematics courses 

Vectors, differential calculus of functions of several variables, vector differential calculus. 

MA 491 Reading in Honors Mathematics 2 to 6 

Prerequisites: Membership in Honors Program and permission of department chairman 
This is a reading course for exceptionally able students at the junior and senior levels. It 
will follow the English precedent in university education so that the student will read in 
some area of advanced mathematics, will present a written report of his reading, and will stand 
an examination on it. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MA 512 Advanced Calculus ii 3 (3-0) f « 

Prerequisite: MA 511 

Vector integral calculus, infinite series, integral calculus of functions of several variables. 



Mathematics 339 

MA 513 Advanced Calculus III 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

Functions of a complex variable, partial diflercntial equations, Fourier series. 

MA 514 Methods of Applied Mathematics 3 (3-0) ■ 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

Introduction to difference equations, integral equations, and calculus of variations. 

MA 516 Principles of Mathematical Analysis 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

The real number system, elements of set theory, limits, continuity, differentiation, Reimann- 
Stieltjes integration, sequences of functions, fundamentals of Lebesque theory, topological and 
metric spaces. 

MA 517 Introduction to Point-Set Topology 3 (3-0) a 

Prerequisite: MA 516 

A study of basic set-theoretic and general topological notions of modern mathematics. Topics 
include set theory and cardinal numbers, topological spaces, metric spaces, and elementary 
discussion of function spaces. 

MA 523 Theory of Probability II 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisites: MA 405 and MA 522 

Binomial, Poisson, and normal distributions, law of large numbers, recurrent events renewal 
theory, Markov chains. Characteristic function and distribution functions, simple stochastic 
processes. Introduction to game theory and linear programming. 

MA 527 Numerical Analysis I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 511 

Numerical solution of equations, introduction to the theory of errors, finite-difference tables 
and the theory of interpolation, numerical integration, numerical differentiation, and elements 
of difference calculus. 

MA 528 Numerical Analysis II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 527 

Difference operators, summation procedures, numerical solution of ordinary differential equa- 
tions, least-squares polynomial approximation, and Gaussian quadrature. 

MA 532 Differential Equations II 3 (3-0) I 

Prerequisite: MA 511 

Phase-plane concepts; elementary critical points and stability theory; second order linear equa- 
tions with variable coefficients; general linear autonomous systems; forced oscillations of 
linear systems; the method of Frobenius; Bessel, Legendre and hypergeometric functions; 
regular singular points; Sturm-Liouville systems; eigenvalue problems and generalized Fourier 
expansions; existence and uniqueness theorems. 

MA 536 Logic for Digital Computers 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 511 

Introduction to logic and formal languages of digital computers, algorithms, compilers, and 
heuristic programming. 

MA 537 Non-numeric Uses of Computers 3 (3-0) • 

Prerequisite: MA 536 

The use of computers in problems not involving numerical analysis. Formal differentiation and 
integration, algebraic models, combinatorics, theorem proving and decision making. Problems 
of mechanical translation. Special computers. 

MA 555 (PY 555) Principles of Astrodynomics 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: MA 511, either PY 401 or EM 312 

The differential equations of motion in two-body problems and their integrals; orbit theory; 
integrals of the n-body problem; differential equations of motion of natural and artificial 
satellites and their approximate solutions. Mr. Musen 



340 The General Catalog 
Courses for Graduates Only 

MA 602 Partial Differential Equations 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

Ordinary differential equations in more than two variables, partial differential equations of 
the first order, partial differential equations of the second order, Laplace's equation, the 
wave equation, the diffusion equation. 

MA 605 Non-Linear Differential Equations 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: MA 512, MA 532 

Phase-plane and phase-space concepts; existence and uniqueness theorems; continuity, analytic 
and differentiability properties of solution; properties of linear systems; stability in non-linear 
systems; topological methods; perturbations of periodic solutions; asymptotic methods and 
resonance problems. Mr. Struble 

MA 608 Integral Equations 3 (3-0) 

Alternate summers 

Prerequisites: MA 512, MA 532 

Linear Volterra intergral equations of the first and second kinds. Relationship to linear differ- 
ential initial value problems. Special Volterra equations of the convolution type. Singular 
Volterra equations. Linear Fredholm integral equations of the first and second kind. Basic 
theory. Symmetric kernels. Hilbert-Schmidt theory (generalizations). Mr. Winton 

MA 611 Complex Variable Theory and Applications I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

Elementary functions; analytic functions and Cauchy-Riemann equations; conformal map- 
ping and applications; Taylor and Laurent series; contour integration and residue theory; the 
Schwarz-Christoffel transformation. Mr, Bullock 

MA 612 Complex Variable Theory and Applications II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 611 

Conformal mapping and applications to flow phenomena; multiple-valued functions and 
Riemann surfaces; further applications of residue theory; analytic continuation; infinite series 
and asymptotic expansions; elliptic functions and other special functions in the complex 
domain; structure of functions. Mr. Bullock 

MA 615 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable I Alternate years 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

Sets and spaces; continuity and differentiability of real functions. Mr. Harrington 

MA 616 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable II Alternate years 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 615 

Measure, measurable sets and functions, theory of Lebesque integration. 

Mr. Harrington 

MA 621 Introduction to Modern Abstract Algebra 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

A study of the abstract structure and properties of groups, rings and ideals, and fields. 

Messrs. Nahikian, Park, Wahab 

MA 622 Vector Spaces and Matrices 3 (3-0) 8 
Prerequisite: MA 511 

A study of vector spaces and their relation to the theory of matrices. Matrix inversion, linear 
transformations, including similarity and orthogonal transformations, canonical forms. Prop- 
erties of the characteristic and reduced characteristic function. Elementary divisors and 
functions of matrices. Applications to systems of differential equations. 

Messrs. Nahikian, Park, Wahab 

MA 625 Introduction to Differential Geometry Alternate summers 3 (3-0) 
Prerequisite: MA 512 

Theory of curves and surfaces in 3-dimensional euclidean space with special reference to those 

properties invariant under the rigid body motions. Messrs. Levine, Winton 



Mathematics 341 

MA 632 Operational Mathematics I 3 (3-0) f 

Ckjrequisite: MA 513 or MA 611 

Laplace transform with theory and application to problems in ordinary and partial differen- 
tial equations arising from engineering and physics problems; Fourier integral and Fourier 
transforms and applications. Messrs. Cell, Harrington 

MA 633 Operational Mathematics II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 632 

Extended development of the Laplace and Fourier transforms and their uses in the solution 
of problems in ordinary and partial differential equations and in difference equations; Sturm- 
Liouville systems; advanced theory in ordinary and partial differential equations; other infi- 
nite and finite transforms and their applications. Messrs. Cell, Harrington 

MA 635 Mathematics of Computers 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: MA 528, MA 512, MA 335; Corequisite: MA 405 or MA 622 

The development of methods for the solution of selected problems involving matrices; integral 
rational equations; ordinary and partial differential equations. Particular attention is paid 
to the question of convergence and stability; examples solved on the IBM 650. 

MA 641 Calculus of Variotions Alternate summers 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

The simplest problem of the calculus of variations in detail; variable endpoints; isoperimetric 
problems; Hamilton's principle; least action principle; introduction to the theory of linear 
integral equations of the Volterra and Fredholm types. Mr. Winton 

MA 651 Expansion of Functions Alternote summers 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: MA 611, 633 or equivalent 

Expansion of functions of one or more variables in Taylor series; asymptotic series; infinite 
products, partial fractions, continued fractions, series of orthogonal functions; applications in 
ordinary partial differential equations, difference equations and integral equations. 

Messrs. Cell, Harrington 

MA 655 Mathematics of Astrodynamics I 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: MA 532 or MA 605 

Two-body problem and its integrals, differential equations of the disturbed planetary motion, 
disturbing function (potential of the disturbed motion), literal and numerical methods for 
expansion of the disturbing function, perturbation of the first and second order, methods of 
Hansen, Hill, and Brouwer, theory of resonance. Mr. Musen 

MA 656 Mathematics of Astrodynamics II 3 (3-0) 
Prerequisite: MA 655 

Theories of artificial satellites, influence of the sun and moon on the motion of artificial 

satellites, orbit stability, lunar theories. Mr. Musen 

MA 661 Tensor Analysis I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

The basic theory, tensor algebra, tensor calculus; invariants of quadratic differential forms; 
covariant differentiation; geometric applications, Reimannian spaces; generalized vector analy- 
sis. Mr. Levine 

MA 662 Tensor Analysis II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 661 

Continuation of MA 661. Physical applications; dynamics, Legrange's equations, the geometry 
of dynamics, cofiguration spaces. Further applications to electromagnetic theory and elasticity. 

Mr. Levine 

MA 681 Special Topics in Analysis up fo 6 hours credit 

MA 683 Special Topics in Algebra up to 6 hours credit 

MA 685 Speciol Topics in Numerical Analysis up to 6 hours credit 



342 The General Catalog 

MA 687 Special Topics in Geometry up to 6 hours credit 

MA 689 Special Topics in Applied Mafhematics up to 6 hours credit 

The above courses, MA 681 -MA 689, afford opportunities for graduate students to study ad- 
vanced topics in mathematics under the direction of members of the graduate staff. These 
will on occasion consist of one of several areas such as, for example, advanced theory of 
partial differential equations, topology, mathematics of plasticity or of viscoelasticity, mathe- 
matics of orbital mechanics. 

MA 691 Research in Mathematics Credits by arrangment 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of adviser 
Individual research in the field of mathematics. 



Maf-hemafics and Science Education 

(See Education) 

Mechanical Engineering 

Courses for Undergraduates 

ME 101, ME 102 Engineering Graphics I, II 2 (1-3) f s 

Corequisite: MA 101 or MA HI 

The objective of these courses is to teach the student the proper methods, techniques, and 
procedures of expression and interpreting data in this medium of communication. Theories 
and common practices are used to emphasize instrument practice, geometrical construction, 
freehand technical sketching, completion of prepared worksheets, sections, projections, auxili- 
ary views, pictorial views, diagramatic sketches and drawings using standard symbols, charts 
and graphs, and blueprint reading. Special emphasis will be placed upon visualization in the 
analysis and solution of geometrical magnitudes represented by points, lines, planes, and 
solids; intersection and development of flat and curved surfaces. 

ME 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: MA 202 and PY 201 

A study of energy and energy transformations; the First and Second Laws applied to systems 
and to control volumes; thermodynamic properties of systems; property changes occurring 
resulting from charges in state; availability of energy. 

ME 302 Engineering Thermodynamics II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 301 

A continuation of engineering thermodynamics I for Mechanical Engineering juniors. Thermo- 
dynamics of mixtures; chemical thermodynamics; thermodynamics of fluid flow; vapor and 
gas cycles; applications to compressors, internal combustion engines, steam and gas turbines, 
refrigeration. 

ME 303 Engineering Thermodynamics III 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 301 

A continuation of engineering thermodynamics I for non-Mechanical Engineering juniors. 
Thermodynamics of mixtures; thermodynamics of fluid flow; heat transfer; vapor and gas 
cycles and applications. 

ME 304 Fundamentals of Heot Power 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: PY 211 

Energy and energy transformations, including a brief discussion of measurements of quan- 
tities involved. Properties of working substances, particularly steam. Elementary combustion 
of fuels. Steam power cycles and applications to steam turbines. Elements of heat transfer. 



Mechanical Engineering 343 

ME 305 Mechanicol Engineering Laboratory I 1 (0-3) ff 

Corequisite: ME 301 

Theory and principles involved in instrumentation and measurements. Limitation and sources 
of error of each technique studied. Utilization of the instrumentation in predetermined 
situations that exhibit the essential characteristics of the instrumentation. Consideration of 
transient and steady state techniques. Areas of study: pyrometric measurements, piezo meas- 
urements and measurements of flow properties. 

ME 306 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II 1 (0-3) t 

Prerequisite: ME 305; Corequisites: EM 301 and ME 312 

A continuation of ME 305 with emphasis on measurements of kinematic quantities, measure- 
ments of thermophysical properties and energy measurements. Treatment of experimental 
data. 

ME 311 Kinematics 3 (3-0) f 

Corequisite: EM 301 

Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering 

The application of the principles of kinematics to the field of Mechanical Engineering. 

ME 312 Dynamic Analysis 3 (3-0) a 

Prerequisites: ME 311 and MA 301 

Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering 

The application of rational dynamics to the field of mechanical engineering; the science of 

motions resulting from any force, and of the forces required to produce motions. 

ME 352 Aerodynamics 3 (3-0) « 

Prerequisites: EM 200 and MA 301 

Fundamental concepts underlying experimental aerodynamics, the aerodynamicist's data, 
elementary flow theory, Reynolds number and the effect of viscosity, Mach number and 
compressibility, finite wing theory. 

ME 361 Aerospace Technology 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisites: PY 202, EM 301, and MA 301 

An introduction to the principles of flight in and beyond the atmosphere. Includes the ele- 
ments of aerodynamics of flight, the reentry problem, flight dynamics, guidance and control, 
power generation in space, manned and unmanned space flight and life support systems. 

ME 401 Power Plants 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering 

A study of the basic technical principles of the transformation of energy into useful forms 

and the study of the fundamental sciences leading to engineering decisions of selection and 

arrangement of energy transforming equipment. Various types and kinds of plants. Energy 

balance and significance upon the proper selection of elements in the power plan. Economic 

selection of components. Factors affecting the cost of power and the elements which enter into 

the problems arriving at monetary electric rates. 

ME 405 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Mi 1 (0-3) f 

Prerequisite: ME 306 

Experimental analysis of engineering systems. Selection of appropriate instrumentation and 
analysis of predetermined small scale engineering systems designed for flexibility and wide 
variation of parameters. Experiments cover the gamut of mechanical engineering activity. 

ME 406 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory IV 1 (0-3) S 

Prerequisite: ME 405 

Individual or small group investigation of an original problem. A project type of program. 

ME 410 Jet Propulsion 3 (3-0) i 

Prerequisite: ME 302 and ME 352 or EM 303 

Application of fundamental principles of thermodynamics and the mechanics of a compres- 
sible fluid to the processes of jet-propulsion and turbo-propeller aircraft; the effect of per- 
formance of components on performance of engine; analysis of engine performance para- 
meters. 



344 The General Catalog 

ME 411 Machine Design I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ME 312 and EM 301 
Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering 

Basic principles of the mechanical sciences applied to the analysis of machines, devices, and 
mechanical systems. State of stress, state of strain, elasticity, working stresses, stress concen- 
tration, fatigue, impact and shock, plasticity, thermal stress, wear, lubrication and contact 
stress. 

ME 412 Machine Design II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 411 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering 

Synthesis of machines, devices, and mechanical systems. The specification of systems, formu- 
lation of region of design, synthesis of elements, complete analysis of the ensemble, evaluation 
and closure of the design. Project activity with research emphasis. 

ME 421 Aerospace Propulsion Systems 3 (3-0) • 

Prerequisites: ME 361 and ME 302 

A study of propulsion systems and their relation to the various flight regimes and space 
missions. The principles of thrust generation, the control, and the performance of various 
propulsion systems will be considered. 

ME 435 Industrial Automatic Controls 3 (3-0) f or s 

Prerequisites: ME 301 and MA 301 

Introduction to concept of automatic controls; fundamentals of two-position, proportional, 
floating and rate modes of control with a graphical and analytical presentation of each. 
Theoretical considerations of the process and an introduction to system analysis. 

ME 441 Technical Seminar 1 (1-0) f or s 

Prerequisite: Graduating senior standing 

Meetings once a week for the delivery and discussion of student papers on topics of current 
interest in Mechanical Engineering. 

ME 446 Performance of Hypervelocity Vehicles 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ME 361, ME 352 

1 he application of the aerospace sciences to the estimation of the performance stability and 

control of hypervelocity vehicles. 

ME 451 Introduction to Rocketry 3 (3-0) f or s 

Prerequisites: ME 301 and 352 or equivalent 

Basic principles of rocket propulsion. Consideration of the significance and use of parameters 
such as specific impulse, characteristic velocity, thrust coefficient. General description of liquid, 
solid and hybrid power plants. Performance calculations and design considerations. 

ME 453 Applied Aerodynamics 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 352 

Determination of design data, tunnel wall and ground effect interference corrections, span- 
wise and chordwise load distributions, performance estimation, and stability and control 
analysis. Attention is given to transonic and supersonic aerodynamics. 

ME 465, 466 Aerospace Engineering Laboratory 1 (0-3) f s 

Prerequisite: ME 361 

Laboratory experience in wind tunnel experimentation, structural testing, environmental test- 
ing, and instrumentation for flight in and beyond the atmosphere. 

ME 469 Spacecraft Structures 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ME 361 and EM 301 

To provide the basic structural background necessary to the design of light weight structures 
for flight in and beyond the atmosphere. 

ME 471 Aircraft and Missile Design 3 (1-6) f 

Prerequisites: ME 361, ME 352 

Elements of the design of modem aircraft and high-speed missile configuration to meet pre- 
scribed aerodynamic, structural, performance, and stability specifications. 



Mechanical Engineering 345 

ME 472 Spacecraft Design 3 (1-6) • 

Prerequisite: ME 361 

A study of flight requirements leading to determination of flight criteria and the specifica* 

tions of spacecraft systems. The application of aerospace sciences to the design of space- 

craft. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ME 501 Steam and Gas Turbines 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ME 302 and EM 303 or ME 352 

Fundamental analysis of the theory and design of turbomachinery flow passages: control and 
performance of turbomachinery; gas-turbine engine processes. 

ME 502 Heat Transfer 3 (3-0) f or • 

Prerequisites: ME 301 and MA 301 

A study of the fundamental laws of heat transfer by conducting convection and radiation; 

steady and unsteady states heat transfer. 

ME 503, 504 Elements of Nuclear Power Generotion I, II 3 (3-0) f a 

Prerequisite: CHE 521 

Engineering analysis and calculations involved in the elements of nuclear power generation 
including ideal and actual power cycles, prime movers and appurtenances. Elements of the 
cost of power and the engineering economics of selection of equipment. The nuclear reactor 
development and status as a source of power including a critical review of recent develop- 
ments. 

ME 507, 508 Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

The fundamentals common to internal combustion engine cycles of operation. The Otto 
engine: carburetion, fuel distribution, flame propagation, normal and knocking combustion, 
throttling, pumping, valve and spark timing, and altitude effects; the Diesel engine: injec- 
tion and spray formation fuel rating, atomization, penetration, diesel knock, combustion, pre- 
combustion, and scavenging as applied to reciprocating and rotary engines. 

ME 515 Experimental Stress Analysis 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: ME 312 

Theoretical and experimental techniques of strain and stress analysis, with experimental em- 
phasis on electrical strain gages and instrumentation, brittle coatings, grid methods, and 
photoelasticity. Laboratory includes a full experimental investigation and report of a prob- 
lem chosen by the student under the guidance of the instructor. 

ME 516 Photoelasticity 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: ME 515 

Two and three-dimensional photoelasticity; the stress-optic law, isochromatics, isoclinics, 
stress trajectories, fractional orders of interference; three dimensional techniques, oblique in- 
cidence, rotational and thickness effects; determination of principal stresses at interior points; 
laboratory investigations. 

ME 517 Lubrication 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: EM 303 

The theory of hydrodynamic lubrication; Reynold's equation, the Sommerfield integration, 
effect of variable lubricant properties and energy equation for temperature rise. Properties of 
lubricants. Application to design of bearings. Boundary lubrication. 

ME 521 Aerothermodynamics 3 (3-0) f or t 

Prerequisites: ME 301, MA 301 and EM 303 or ME 352 

An examination of the basic concepts of gas dynamics such as the continuum, domain of 
applicability of continuum, acoustic velocity, compressibility effects, and the conservation laws. 
Analysis of one dimensional flows such as isentropic flow, diabatic flow, flow with friction, 
the normal shock. An introduction to the vector formulation of multi-dimensional problems. 



346 The General Catalog 

ME 541, 542 Aerodynamic Heating 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: MA 511 and ME 521 or equivalent 

A detailed study of the latest theoretical and experimental findings of the compressible 
laminar and turbulent boundary layers with special attention to the aerodynamic heating 
problem; application of theory in the analysis and design of aerospace hardware. 

ME 545, 546 Project Work in Mechanical Engineering I, II 2 (0-4) f or s 

Individual or small group investigation of a problem stemming from a mutual student-faculty 
interest. Emphasis is placed on providing a situation for exploiting student curiosity. 

ME 551 Flying Qualities 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 352 

Evaluation of Hying qualities of airplanes, important factors and criteria for design, analysis 
of stick-fixed and stick-free control and stability, maneuvering stability, lateral controllability, 
and stick force determination. 

ME 552 Aircraft Applied Loads 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 453 

Determination of aerodynamics loads, maneuvering and gust loads, V-g diagram, spanwise 
distributions on unswept and swept wings, dynamic flight loads. Consideration of the load 
modifications in the transonic flight range. 

ME 553 Propeller and Rotary Wing Design 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 453 

A study of the design of aircraft propellers and rotary wing theory and design. Discussion of 
problems of performance evaluation, control and stability, as applied to rotating wing air- 
craft. 

ME 554 Advanced Aerodynamic Theory 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 352 

Development of fundamental aerodynamic theory. Emphasis upon mathematical analysis and 
derivation of equations of motion, airfoil theory and comparison with experimental results. 
Introduction to supersonic flow theory. 

ME 562 Advanced Aircraft Structures 3 (3-0) s 

Development of methods of stress analysis for aircraft structures, special problems in struc- 
tural design, stiffened panels, rigid frames, indeterminate structures, general relaxation theory. 

ME 571 Air Conditioning 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

A fundamental study of summer and winter air conditioning including temperature, humidity, 
air velocity and distribution. 

ME 572 Refrigeration 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

A thermodynamic analysis of the simple, compound, centrifugal and multiple effect compres- 
•ion systems, the steam jet system and the absorption system of refrigeration. 

ME 581, 582 Hypersonic Aerodynamics 3 (3-0) f % 

Prerequisites: MA 512 and ME 352 or equivalent 

A detailed study of the latest theoretical and experimental findings in hypersonic aero- 
dynamics. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ME 601 Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 302 or ME 303 

First and Second Laws; theory of variable specific heats; general equations of thermodynamics; 
characteristic equations of state; reduced coordinates; prediction of properties of gases and 
vapors; chemical equilibrium; metastables; thermodynamics of fluid flow. 



Mechanical Engineering 347 

ME 602 Statistical Thermodynamics 3 (3-0) a 

Prerequisites: ME 601 and MA 511 

Fundamental principles of kinetic theory, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics and ir- 
reversible phenomena with particular reference to thermodynamics systems and processes. The 
conclusions of the classical thermodynamics are analyzed and established from the micro- 
scopic viewpoint. 

ME 603 Advanced Power Plants 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 401 

A critical analysis of the energy balance of thermal power plants; thermodynamics and 
economic evaluation of alternate schemes of development; study of recent developments in 
the production of power. 

ME 605 Aerothermochemistry 3 (3-0) s 

Prerc(]uisites: ME 601 and MA 511 or equivalent 

A generalized treatment of combustion thermodynamics including derivation of thermo- 
dynamics quantities by the method of Jacobians, criteria for thermodynamic equilibrium, 
computation of equilibrium composition and adiabatic flame temperature. Introduction to 
classical chemical kinetics. Conservation equations for a reacting system, detonation and de- 
flagration. Theories of flame propagation, flame stabilization, and turbulent combustion. 

ME 606 Advanced Gas Dynomies 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ME 521, ME 601 and MA 511 

The general conservation equations of gas dynamics from a differential and integral point of 
view. Hyperbolic compressible flow equations, unsteady one-dimensional flows, the non- 
linear problem of shock wave formation, isentrophic plane flow, flow in nozzles and jets, 
turbulent flow. 

ME 608 Advanced Heat Transfer I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 502 or equivalent 

Fundamental aspects, from an advanced viewpoint, will be considered in the conduction of 
heat through solids, convection phenomena, and the measurement and prediction of appro- 
priate physical properties. Boundary value problems arising in heat conduction will be ex- 
amined and both numerical and function solution techniques developed. Internal and ex- 
ternal boundary layer analyses will be made on a variety of representative convection situa- 
tions. 

ME 609 Advanced Heat Transfer II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 608 

Advanced topics in the nonisothermal flow of fluids through channels will be investigated 
for slug, laminar, transitional and turbulent conditions. The influence of mass transfer on 
flow and heat transfer processes will be considered. Radiation exchange processes between 
solid surfaces and solid surfaces and gasses both stationary and moving will be discussed. 

ME 610 Advonced Topics in Heat Transfer 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 609 

This course constitutes a study of recent developments in heat transfer and related areas. It 

is anticipated that the course content will change from semester to semester. 

ME 611, 612 Advanced Machine Design I, II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ME 412 

Kinematics of mechanical media, the stress tensor, the tensor of strains, elasticity, plasticity, 
time-dependent behavior; theories of failure, working stresses; shock and steady dynamic load- 
ing, creep, stress concentration, thermal stress, contact stresses; energy theories, finite differ- 
ence and relaxation methods, hydrodynamic lubrication. Application to the design of machine 
frames, shafts, bearings, gears, springs, cams, etc. 

ME 613 Mechanics of Machinery 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ME 312 and MA 512 

Vector dynamics, d'Alembert's principle, Lagrange's equations, rigid kinematics, Euler's angles, 
rigid rotation, Coriolis accelerations; the inertia tensor. Application to mechanisms, gyro- 
scopes, guidance and control systems, rotating and reciprocating devices. 



348 The General Catalog 

ME 614 Mechanical Transients and Machine Vibrations 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ME 312 or EM 545 and MA 512 

Dynamic loads in mechanical media are considered in two categories— steady vibrations and 

transient shock and impact. The Lagrange equations and the wave equation are employed 

to study internal stresses and displacements in mechanical devices which result from such 

loading. 

ME 615 Aeroelasticity I 3-0 

Prerequisites: MA 541, ME 411 or ME 459, ME 521 

Deformations of aero structures under static and dynamic loads, natural mode shapes and 
frequencies; two and three dimensional incompressible flow, wings, and bodies in unsteady 
flow; statis aeroelastic phenomena. 

ME 616 Aeroelasticity II 0-3 

Prerequisites: MA 511, ME 615 

Flutter; dynamic response phenomena such as transient landing stresses, gusts, continuous 

atmospheric turbulence; aeroelastic model theory, model design and construction. 

ME 617 Plates and Shells in Mechanical Design 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisites: MA 511 and ME 611 

The concept of members which are thin in one dimension, that is, plates and shells, is 
applied to mechanical design with particular emphasis on type of loading, conditions of 
service, and compliance of the member to its environment. 

ME 631 Applications of Ultrasonics to Engineering Researrh 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: MA 511 and EE 332 

The technique and theory of propagation of ultrasonics in liquids, gases and solids. Develop- 
ment of ultrasonic transducers, the elastic piezoelectric, and dielectric relationships. Ultra- 
sonic applications of asdic or sonor, cavitation, emulsiflcation, soldering, welding, and acoustic 
properties of gases, liquids and solids. 

ME 641 Mechanical Engineering Seminar 1 or 1 

Faculty and graduate student discussions centered around current research problems and ad- 
vanced engineering theories. 

ME 642 Advanced Topics in Mechonical Engineering 1 to 6 credits f or s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Faculty and graduate student discussions of advanced topics in contemporary Mechanical 

Engineering. 

ME 645 Mechanical Engineering Research Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Mechanical Engineering and approval of adviser 
Individual research in the field of Mechanical Engineering. 

ME 651 Principles of Fluid Motion 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 352 or equivalent; Corequisite: MA 511 

Fundamental principles of fluid dynamics. Mathematical methods of analysis are emphasized. 
Potential flow theory development with introduction to the effects of viscosity and compres- 
sibility. Two dimensional and three dimensional pheonomena are considered. 

ME 652 Dynamics of Compressible Flow 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 521 or equivalent; Corequisite: MA 511 

Properties of compressible fluids, equation of motion of one-dimensional motion, channel 
flows, shock wave theory, methods of observation, and flows at transonic speeds. 

ME 653 Supersonic Aerodynamics 3 (5-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 652 

Equations of motion in supersonic flow, Prandtl-Meyer turns, method characteristics, hodo- 

graph plane, supersonic wind tunnels, supersonic airfoil theory, and boundary layer shock 

interaction. 



Metallurgical Engineering 349 

ME 654 Dynamics of Viscous Fluids 3 (3-0) ■ 

Prerequisite: ME 555 or equivalent; Corequisite: MA 511 

Development of the Navier-Stokes equations and the boundary layer theory. Laminar and 
turbulent boundary layers in theory and experiment, flow separation, and transition. 

ME 660 Aero-Mechanical Engineering Problems 3 (3-0) ■ 

Prerequisites: ME 502, M.\ 514, 543 or equivalent 

Derivation of governing equations and set-up of representative problems in heat transfer, gas 
dynamics and magneto-hydrodynamics; review of techniques for solving these problems. 
Introduction of other techniques such as method of steepest descent, method of Weiner-Hopf. 
variational methods and others. Phase-space and function space concepts will be introduced 
also. Purpose of the course in the graduate program to strengthen the analytical techniques 
of the students in dealing with aero-mechanical engineering problems so that in their later 
studies more emphasis may be put on formulation of new problems and physical interpre- 
tation of new results. 

ME 661, 662 Aerospoce Energy Systems 3 (3-0) f ■ 

Prerequisites: MA 512. ME 521. PY 407 or equivalent 

A study of energy systems appropriate to the varied requirements of space operations. In- 
cludes analysis of chemical, nuclear and solar energy sources and the theory of their adapta- 
tion to operational requirements for propulsion and auxiliary power, cooling requirements, 
coolants and materials. 

ME 671, 672 Advanced Air Conditioning Design I, II 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: ME 571 and ME 572 

The design of heating and air conditioning systems; the preparation of specifications and per- 
formance tests on heating and air conditioning equipment. 

ME 691, 692 Advanced Spocecroft Design 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: ME 542, ME 582 and MA 512 

Analysis and design of spacecraft including system design criteria, acceleration tolerance, 
entry environment, thermal requirements, criteria for configuration design, aerodynamic de- 
sign, heating rates, thermostructural design, boost phase, de-orbit, entry corridor, lift modula- 
tion, rolling entry, glide phase, maneuvering and landing, stability and control, thermal 
protection system, materials, instrumentation, and life support systems. 



Metallurgical Engineering 

Courses for Undergraduates 

MIM 201, 202 Structure and Properties of Engineering Materials I, II 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 103 

I An introduction to the fundamental physical principles governing the structure and con- 
stitution of metallic and non-metallic materials of construction, and the relation of these 
principles to the control of properties. 

II Imporant applications of engineering materials and criteria for selection of materials. 

MIM 321 Metallurgy 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CH 103 

A general course in physical metallurgy including laboratory work. 

The constitution, structure, and properties of metals and alloys. 

MIM 331, 332 Physical Metallurgy I, II 3 (3.0) f , 

Prerequisites: CH 103, MIM 201 
Required of juniors in MTE 

The fundamental principles of physical metallurgy with emphasis on correlation between 
structure, constitution, and properties of metals and alloys. A systematic development of 
the metallurgical aspects of atomic and crystalline structure, solid solution, diffusion, preci- 
pitation hardening, elastic and plastic behavior, and recrystallization. 



350 The General Catalog 

MIM 401, 402 Metallurgical Operations I, II 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIM 332 

A systematized treatment of the fundamental operations involved in the production and 
fabrication of metals and alloys. Part I deals primarily with procedures and operations em- 
ployed in chemical or extractive metallurgy. Part II covers the operations of physical and 
mechanical metallurgy. 

MIM 421, 422 Metallurgy I, 11 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 103 

Required of seniors in ME and MEA 

The constitution, structure and properties of engineering ferrous and non-ferrous metals and 

alloys; influences of mechanical working and heat treatment; physical testing, corrosion and 

its prevention. Laboratory work included in second semester. 

MIM 423 Metallurgical Laborotory 1 (0-3) f s 

Corequisite: MIM 421 or MIM 422 

Laboratory work to accompany Metallurgy I, II 

MIM 431, 432 Metallogrophy I, II 3 (2-3) f a 

Prerequisite: MIM 332 

An intensive study of the principles and techniques for examination and correlation of the 
structure, constitution, and properties of metals and alloys. 

MIM 445, 446 Experimental Engineering I, II 3 (1-6) f 8 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 or approval of instructor 

Advanced engineering principles applied to a specific project dealing with metallurgy, metal- 
lography, or general experimental work. A seminar period provided and a written report 
required. 

MIM 451, 452 Metallurgical Engineering Seminar 1 (1-0) f t 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in MTE 

Reports and discussion of special topics in metallurgical engineering and related subjects. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MIM 521, 522 Advanced Physical Metallurgy I, II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 or MIM 432 

Theories concerning behavior and control of engineering alloys, reaction rates in the solid 
state and alloy influences; current heat treating practices, surface treatments; behavior of 
metals at high and low temperatures; special purpose alloys; powder metallurgy; review of 
modern equipment and methods for the study of metals. 

MIM 523, 524 Metallurgicol Factors in Design 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 

A study of the metallurgical factors that must be considered in using metals in design. 

MIM 541, 542 Principles of Corrosion I, II 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 

The fundamentals of metalic corrosion and passivity. The electrochemical nature of corrosive 
attack, basic forms of corrosion, corrosion rate factors, methods of corrosion protection. 
Laboratory work included. 

MIM 545, 546 Advanced Metallurgical Experiments I, II 3 (1-6) f s 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 or approval of instructor 

Advanced engineering principles applied to a specific experimental metallurgical project. A 
seminar period is provided and a written report is required. 



Military Science 351 

MIM 561 Advanced Structure ond Properties of Materials 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 

A systematic treatment of the fundamental physico-chemical principles governing the con- 
stitution of both metallic and ceramic materials. Correlation of these principles with physical, 
mechanical and chemical properties of materials. Particular emphasis is placed upon ma- 
terials of construction for nuclear reactors. Lecture and laboratory. 

MIM 562 Materials Problems in Nuclear Engineering 3 (2-3) t 

Prerequisite: MIM 561 

Engineering aspects of problems involved in the selection and application of reactor materials. 
Specific attention is given to elevated temperature behavior, fatigue, corrosion, irradiation 
damage, and the fabrication and processing of these materials. Lecture and laboratory. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

MIM 651, 652 Theory and Structure of Metals 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MIM 522 

An advanced interpretation of the development of theories of the metallic state with em- 
phasis on modern physical concepts. Topics include theory of crystallinity, bonding forces, 
stability of metallic structures, diffusion, and dislocation theory. 

MIM 695 Metallurgical Engineering Research Credits by arrangement 

Independent investigation of an appropriate problem in Metallurgical Engineering. A report 
on this investigation is required as a graduate thesis. 



Military Science 

The Basic Course 

MS 101 Military Science I 1 (1-1) f 

Classroom instruction is given in individual weapons and marksmanship, and organization of 
the Army. On the drill field, emphasis is placed on development of teamwork, esprit de corps, 
and essential characteristics of leadership. 

MS 102 Militory Science I 1 (1-1) a 

Prerequisite: MS 101 or equivalent credit 

Classroom instruction is given in the role of United States Army and National Security, On 
the drill field, emphasis is placed on development of teamwork, esprit de corps, essential 
characteristics of leadership. 

MS 201 Military Science II 1 (0-3) f 

Prerequisites: MS 101, MS 102, or equivalent credit 

Classroom instruction in American Military History. On the drill field emphasis is placed on 
development of teamwork, esprit de corps, essential characteristics of leadership, and accept- 
ance of responsibility. 

MS 202 Military Science II 1 (0-3) t 

Prerequisites: MS I and MS 201 or equivalent credit 

Classroom instruction in map and aerial photograph reading and introduction to operation* 
and basic tactics. On the drill field emphasis is placed on development of teamwork, esprit 
de corps, essential characteristics of leadership, and acceptance of responsibility. 



352 The General Catalog 
The Advanced Course 

MS 301 Military Science III 1 (2-1) f 

Prerequisites: MS I and MS II or equivalent credit 

Classroom instruction is given in military leadership, emphasizing the factors controlling the 
soldier's behavior and the problems of command; branches of the Army, emphasizing the 
mission of each in order to acquaint students with all branches prior to their ROTC Summer 
Camp and selection of branch in their senior year; principles of military planning and con- 
duct of offensive and defensive tactics. Practical leadership instruction is provided on the 
drill field where emphasis is placed on acceptance of responsibility, exercise of command, and 
development of self-confidence, initiative and dignity in appearance and demeanor. 

MS 302 Military Science III 2 (2-1) t 

Prerequisite: MS 301 

Classroom instruction is given in methods of military teaching with special reference to the 
leader's responsibility for soldier's learning; continuation of offensive and defensive tactics 
including communications in support of military operations; and a pre-camp orientation prior 
to ROTC Summer Camp. Practical leadership instruction is provided on the drill field where 
emphasis is placed on acceptance of responsibility, exercise of command and development 
of self-confidence. 

MS 401 Military Science IV . . 1 (2-1) # 

Prerequisites: MS III, and satisfactory completion of six weeks' summer camp training 
Classroom instruction is given in military justice, troop movement, logistics, intelligence, and 
operations. On the drill field, emphasis is placed on the exercise of command, planning and 
executing all phases of training (instruction in basic fundamentals, inspections, ceremonies, 
and competitions) and maximum development of teamwork, esprit de corps, and leadership 
characteristics. 

MS 402 Military Science IV 2 (2-1) s 

Prerequisite: MS 401 

Classroom instruction is given in supply and evacuation, Army administration, role of the 
United States in world affairs, and service orientation. On the drill field, emphasis is placed 
on the exercise of command, planning and executing all phases of training (instruction in 
basic fundamentals, inspections, ceremonies, and competitions) and maximum development 
of teamwork, esprit de corps, and leadership characteristics. 

Mineral Industries 

See Ceramic Engineering 

See Geological Engineering 

See Metallurgical Engineering 



Modern Languages 



Courses numbered 200 and above need not be followed as a sequence in their respective 
gamut. Two years of high school language will normally be considered the equivalent of 
one year of college instruction in that language. All students registering for a language course 
will be examined on proficiency and scheduled for the course for which they are fitted. 

English (Foreign Students) 

MLE 101 Elementary English: Pronunciation 3 (3-0) f s 

Emphasis in this course is laid upon the pronunciation and comprehension of American 
English. Through oral reports students are encouraged to improve their diction and pro- 
nunciation. Comprehension is approached through dictation and lectures. Attention to gram- 
mar and spelling is given as individual problems arise. 



Modern Language 353 

MLE 102 Elementary English: Composition 3 (3-0) f s 

Emphasis in this course is laid upon the writing of English, special attention being given 
to compositions, grammatical exercises, sentence structure, spelling and diction. 

French 

MLF 101 Elementary French 3 (3-0) f s 

Structure, diction, pronunciation and other matters of technique of the language, supple- 
mented by readings and translations. No previous training in the language necessary. 

MLF 102 French Grammar and Prose Reading 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisite: MLF 101 or equivalent 

A sui-vey of the basic elements of grammar accompanied and illustrated by intermediate read- 
ings progressing to the reading of standard texts. 

MLF 201 French Prose: Selections From Modern French Literature 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: MLF 101, MLF 102 or equivalent 

Selected readings from literary French. Attention given to the attainment of skill in reading 

and comprehension. 

MLF 202 French Civilization 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: MLF 101, MLF 102 or equivalent 

Special emphasis given to translating from French. After a preliminary survey of the land 
and people of France, such topics as language, arts, science, literature, philosophy, etc., are 
given consideration. Parallel readings and reports. 

MLF 203 Review Grammar and Composition 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: MLF 101, MLF 102 or equivalent 

This course will bridge the gap between basic grammar courses and the more advanced 
literary courses preparing the student for the more advanced type of composition and con- 
versation expected of him in the latter. It will also offer an opportunity for students with 
previous knowledge of a language from secondary schools to review grammar and obtain 
experience in an area not normally covered in their high school work. 

MLF 301 Survey of French Literature 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

Lectures illustrated by selected readings in translation covering the development of the novel, 
the drama, the short story and the poetry of France from the 12th century to the present. 
Parallel readings and reports. No language prerequisites. 

MLF 401 Introductory Scientific French 3 (3-0) f s 

This course is desigiied to present the grammar of scientific French as rapidly as possible 
in preparation for the reading course which follows. 

MLF 402 Introductory Scientific French 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MLF 401 or equivalent 

Reading and translation of technical French, supplemented by discussions on terminology, 
word order, vocabulary analysis and other linguistic techniques. Subject material adjusted 
to individual needs; conferences. 

German 

MLG 101 Elementary German 3 (3-0) f s 

Study of the strurture and technique of the language, supplemented by easy reading and 
translations. No previous training in the language necessary. 

MLG 102 German Grammar and Prose Reading 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MLG 101 or equivalent 

A course designed primarily for students who wish to attain proficiency in reading German. 
Attention given to basic grammar and vocabulary with practice in the translation and inter- 
pretation of German prose. 



354 The General Catalog 

MLG 201 German Prose: Selections from Modern German Literature 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: MLG 101, MLG 102 or equivalent 

Readings in German literature, a study of representative authors and their contribution to 
the development of the German language and culture. Parallel readings and reports. 

MLG 202 German Civilization 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: MLG 101, MLG 102 or equivalent 

Attention given to translation from German. Readings in the history and customs of Ger- 
many, supplemented by lectures on such topics as language, arts, science, philosophy, etc. 
Parallel readings and reports. 

MLG 203 Review Grammar and Composition 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MLG 101, MLG 102 or equivalent 

This course will bridge the gap between basic grammar courses and the more advanced literary 
courses preparing the student for the more advanced type of composition and conversation 
expected of him in the latter. It will also offer an opportunity for students with previous 
knowledge of a language from secondary schools to review grammar and obtain experience 
in an area not normally covered in their high school work. 

MLG 301 Survey of German Literature 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

The study of various types of German literature. A brief outline of German literary develop- 
ment. Parallel readings in translation. No previous training in the language necessary. 

MLG 401 German Grammar for Graduate Students 3 (3-0) f s 

This course is open to graduate students and senior honor students and is designed to pre- 
sent the grammar of scientific German as rapidly as possible in preparation for the reading 
course which follows. 

MLG 402 Scientific German 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MLG 401 or equivalent 

Reading and translation of technical German, supplemented by discussions on terminology, 
word order, vocabulary analysis and other linguistic techniques. Subject material adjusted 
to individual needs; conferences. 

Italian 

MLI 101 Elementary Italian 3 (3-0) f s 

Structure, diction, pronunciation, and other matters of technique of the language, supple- 
mented by easy readings, individual reports and conferences. No previous training in the 
language required. 

MLI 102 Italian Grammar and Prose Reading 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: MLI 101 or equivalent 

A survey of basic elements of grammar accompanied and illustrated by intermediate readings, 
progressing to the reading of standard texts. 

Russian 

MLR 101 Elementary Russian 3 (3-0) f s 

Basic structure of the language, supplemented by easy readings. 

MLR 102 Russian Grammar and Prose Reading 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MLR 101 

A course for students who wish to attain proficiency in reading Russian. Attention given to 

basic grammar and the use of the written language. 

MLR 201 Russian Prose: Selections from Russian Literature 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: MLR 101, MLR 102 or equivalent 

Selected readings from Russian literature. Grammar review and emphasis on vocabulary 
building and improvement in reading and speaking ability- 



Modern Language 355 

MLR 202 Russian Civilization 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisites: MLR lOL MLR 102 

Reading in Russian covering the history, politics, customs, and culture of Russia. Emphasia 
given to accurate translation from Russian to English. Parallel readings and reports. 

Spanish 

MLS 101 Elementary Spanish 3 (3-0) f • 

Structure, diction, pronunciation and other matters of technique of the language, supple- 
mented by easy readings. No previous training in the language necessary. 

MLS 102 Spanish Grammar and Prose Reading 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: MLS 101 or equivalent 

A survey of the basic elements of grammar accompanied and illustrated by intermediate 
readings progressing to the reading of standard texts. 

MLS 201 Spanish Civilization 3 (3-0) f i 

Prerequisites: MLS 101, MLS 102 or equivalent 

Emphasis is placed upon translating Spanish prose and developing vocabulary. The readings 

give the student a comprehensive picture of the culture, geography, history, and economy of 

Spain. 

MLS 202 Hispano-American Civilization 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisites: MLS 101, MLS 102 or equivalent 

Empasis is placed upon translating Spanish prose and developing vocabulary. The readings 
give the student a comprehensive picture of the culture, geography, history and economy of 
the Spanish American countries. 

MLS 203 Review Grammar and Composition 3 (3-0) f ■ 

Prerequisites: MLS 101, MLS 102 or equivalent 

This course will bridge the gap between basic grammar courses and the more advanced 
literary courses preparing the student for the more advanced type of composition and con- 
versation expected of him in the latter. It will also offer an opportunity for students with 
previous knowledge of a language from secondary schools to review grammar and obtain 
experience in an area not normally covered in their high school work. 

MLS 301 Survey of Spanish Literature 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

Lecture illustrated by selected reading in translation covering the development of the novel, 
drama, short story, and poetry of Spain from 1300 to the present. Parallel reading and 
reports by students. 

MLS 307, 308 Technical Spanish 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: MLS 201 or equivalent 

A study of technical and industrial literature. Particular attention given to the special termi- 
nology characteristic of such literature with a view to the acquisition of a practical vocabu- 
lary. Individual conferences and reports. 

MLS 401 Introductory Scientific Spanish 3 (3-0) f • 

This course is designed to present the grammar of scientific Spanish as rapidly as possible 
in preparation for the reading course which follows. 

MLS 402 Introductory Scientific Spanish 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisite: MLS 401 or equivalent 

Reading and translation of technical Spanish, supplemented by discussion on terminology, 
word order, vocabulary analysis and other linguistic techniques. Subject material adjusted to 
individual needs; conferences. 



356 The General Catalog 

General Courses 

ML 321, 322 Romance Literature 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

A course cutting across language barriers to illustrate the most outstanding literary produc- 
tions of France, Spain, Italy, and Portugal and showing the cultural and social pattern of 
these nationalities having a common language inheritance. Selected readings and reports. 

ML 323, 324 Germanic Literature 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

A study of the literary productions in each of the various types of Germanic literature, and 
lectures on their cultural background. Designed primarily to meet the needs of students who 
wish to supplement their knowledge of their own literature with that of the literature of 
other civilizations. Attention is given to the literary monuments of Germany, Holland, Den- 
mark, Iceland, and the Scandinavian countries. No foreign language prerequisites. 

Nuclear Engineering 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

NE 501 Nuclear Engineering Systems I 3 (3-0) f 

An introductory course in reactor theory and engineering including the fission process; neutron 
energy distribution; lethargy; neutron slowing, diffusion and interactions; Fermi age theory; 
the diffusion equation, criticality conditions; reactor instrumentation. 

Graduate Staff 

NE 502 Nuclear Engineering Systems II 3 (3-0) s 

Continuation of reactor theory from NE 501. Topics include treatment of reactor para- 
meters for homogeneous and heterogeneous reactors; reflected reactors, two-group theory, 
reactor kinetics, temperature effects, control rod theory, perturbation theory and transport 
theory. Graduate Staff 

NE 503 Nuclear Reactor Theory I 3 (3-0) s 

Course considers reactor as a system including aspects of reactor control, radiation protection, 
shielding and thermal design. Graduate Staff 

NE 531 (PY 531) Nuclear Reactor Laboratory 1 (0-1) f s 

Corequisites: PY 518, PY 530 

Observation and measurements of static and dynamic nuclear reactor behavior, the effective- 
ness of control and temperature, and correlation with theory. Experiments of the motion 
and detection of neutrons and gamma-rays, with emphasis on the research uses of nuclear 
reactor radiations. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

NE 619 (PY 619) Reactor Theory and Analysis 1 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: PY 530 

The theory of neutron slowing, resonance capture, Doppler effect, and thermal flux distri- 
butions in heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Analysis of reactor control by temperature, effects 
of localized and distributed absorbers, fission products, fuel consumption and production. 
One-velocity neutron transport theory. 

NE 620 (PY 620) Nuclear Radiation Attenuation 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PY 530, MA 512 

Physical theory of the behavior of neutrons, gamma-rays and charged particles in matter. 
Calculation of source terms, attenuation factors, heating rates, geometrical transformations, 
radiation streaming and radioactive decay effects required in the design of nuclear radiation 
shields for reactors, accelerators, and space vehicles. Transport theory of gamma-ray and 
neutron transmission through matter. Analysis of experimental techniques for obtaining 
shielding data. 



Philosophy and Religion 357 

NE 630 (PY 630) Reactor Theory and Anolysis II 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: PY 530 

The theory of neutron multiplication in uniform media, with several dimensions, regions, 
and neutron energy groups. Reactor control by absorbers, time dependent reactor behavior, 
matrix treatment of perturbation theory, neutron thermalization, energy dependent neutron 
transport theory, and multigroup machine methods. 



Occupational Information and Guidance 

(See Education) 

Philosophy and Religion 

Courses for Undergraduates 

PHI 201 Logic 3 (3-0) f t 

Language as symbol system, the formal structure of reasoning, and characteristics of empirical 
knowledge; emphasis on the establishment of reflective habits. 

PHI 203 Introduction to Philosophy 2 (2-0) f ■ 

The course is designed (1) to acquaint the student with basic principles and problems of 

logic and theory of knowledge; (2) to develop ability in effective philosophical analysis and 
the formulation of one's own ideas in selected areas of contemporary concern. 

PHI 205 Problems and Types of Philosophy 3 (3-0) f « 

The great philosophers of the western world, the socio-cultural heritage in which they 
worked, their major concerns and conclusions; the relation of philosophy to vital questions 
of human life. 

REL 301 Religious Groups and Trends in the United States 2 (2-0) f s 

Background and characteristic beliefs of the major religious groups in the United States; 
survey of the dominant trends and movements in contemporary American religion. 

REL 302 The Bible and Its Background 3 (3-0) f s 

Background of the Bible, origin, growth and development of central concepts, leading person- 
alities, and the process by which it has come to us as viewed in the light of modem 
scholarship. 

REL 303 Christian Ethics 2 (2-0) f t 

An analysis of the major areas of modem life in the light of the ethical teachings of Christian- 
ity, with an examination of the religious faith upon which these teachings rest. 

PHI 305 Philosophy of Religion 3 (3-0) f t 

Psychological and historical roots of religious belief; science, philosophy, and religion; the 
rational foundations of theism; the concept of God in Western thought. 

PHI 306 Philosophy of Art 3 (3-0) f t 

Study of historical and contemporary theories of art; development of coherent set of con- 
cepts for analysis and discussion of esthetic experience, critical judgments, works of art and 
their relations to other aspects of culture. 

PHI 307 Ethics 3 (3-0) f t 

Study of major ethical theories; systematic analysis of the nature of value judgments, and the 
concepts of moral obligation, right and good; personal and social aspects of human conduct. 



358 The General Catalog 

PHI 309 Marriage end Family Living 3 (3-0) f s 

Secular and religious concepts of marriage; physical, socio-psychological, and ethical aspects 
of premarital and marital relationships; parenthood; analysis of value judgments relative to 
marriage and family living; formulation of philosophy of marriage. 

PHI 311 Parent-Child Relationships 2 (2-0) f s 

Principles of inter-personal relationships; democratic values and the attainment of growth 
by parent and child through freedom, responsibility, and creative activity; analysis of current 
theories of husband-wife, and parent-child relationships. 

PHI 395 Philosophical Analysis 3 (3-0) f s 

Semantical, logical, and experiential methods of investigation; intensive application of critical 
inquiry to a few fundamental problems including the nature of knowledge and its validation, 
and value judgment; major objective to afford personal participation in and acquaintance 
with philosophical analysis as intellectual tool with wide applicability. 

PHI 401 Symbolic Logic 3 (3-0) f s 

Modern methods in logic involving formalized expression that avoids inherent difficulties and 
ambiguities of ordinary language and makes possible greater effectiveness in handling complex 
material. 

REL 403 Religions of the World 3 (3-0) f s 

Background, general characteristics, and basic teachings of the major living religions of the 
world; consideration of contemporary secular movements that are in a sense religions. 

PHI 405 Foundations of Science 3 (3-0) f s 

Nature and validity of knowledge, basic concepts of modem science, scientific method, and 
the implications of the philosophy of modem science for ethics, social philosophy, and the 
nature of reality. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

REL 502 Problems of Religion 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Six term credits in religion or related fields 

Major trends in contemporary theology; significance of the resurgent interest in religion and 
the growth of the church in recent times; problem of communication between theology and 
science; the ecumenical movement. 



Physical Education 



The College requires four semesters in physical education to be taken consecutively during 
the freshman and sophomore years. Each semester of physical education is divided into two 
eight-week courses or activities. These courses are divided into two areas; the areas are Pre- 
scribed Courses and Elective Sports Activities. In as much as staff, facilities, and allotment of 
time will permit, each student is directed into courses which will best meet his individual 
needs. The basis for determining the needs of the individual student are as follows: 

1. Medical Examination. The required medical examination should give the College Health 
Service an awareness of unusual physical impairments that a student may have. If the 
student knows of any other possible reason for limiting his physical activity, he should 
inform the college physician. The college physician will then recommend possible limita- 
tions in activities to the Physical Education Department. Based on this recommendation, 
a special program will be arranged for the student involved. All medical recommendations 
must be cleared through the College Health Service. 

2. Swimming Test. All students who have any requirement in physical education to meet, 
at State College, must take a swimming test. Those students who cannot pass the test are 
assigned to Beginning Swimming as their first course in physical education. This course 
must be passed, qualifying the student as a swimmer, before the physical education re- 
quirement is completed. Those students who pass the swimming test are further classified 
according to their ability level. This classification determines which swimming course 
they select first. 



Physical Education 359 

3. Athletic Ability Test. An athletic ability test is given to all freshmen during Freshman 
Orientation Week. Students who score below the 15th percentile are enrolled in a course 
in fundamental sports for two semesters or until they gain a level of ability which indi- 
cates they are ready for the basic sports program. The students who score between the 
15th and the 75th percentile are enrolled in the basic sports program. Those who score 
above the 75th percentile are permitted to elect their activities along with the sophomores. 
All sophomores, juniors, and seniors are allowed to select activities of their choice. 

4. Health Knowledge Test. All freshmen are required to take a health knowledge test during 
Freshman Orientation Week. Those who do not pass this test must take a course in 
hygiene for eight weeks {y^ semester) in lieu of one physical education activity. 

Requirements for Veterans and Transfer Students 

1. All servicemen who have taken as much as six- months military service will receive one 
year of credit, PE 101. PE 102. 

2. All servicemen will be required to take one year of Physical Education (PE 201, PE 202.) 

3. A former student or transfer student with one earned semester credit in Physical Educa- 
tion, plus military service must earn one more semester credit. (PE 202) 

4. A student who has earned one year (2 semester credits) here or elsewhere, plus his credit 
of one year for military service, will have completed his requirements. 

5. Veterans or transfer students who have received credit for two full years of Physical Educa- 
tion, may elect to take additional courses which would be in the 300 series— PE 301, PE 
302, PE 303, PE 304. 

6. All students who have received one year of credit in Physical Education, from military 
service or as a transfer student, will be exempt from the hygiene requirement. 

7. All students who take even one semester of physical education as a required course at 
North Carolina State College must pass the swimming requirement. 



Courses 

PE 101, 102 1 (0-2) f s 

PE 201, 202 1 (0-2) f s 

PE 301, 302, 303, 304 Junior and Senior electives 1 (0-2) f s 

Note: Juniors and seniors may elect any activity from the controlled elective sports area in 
which they have not previously received credit. Transfer students and veterans who cannot 
swim will be urged to elect beginning swimming. 

Courses in Prescribed Sports Area 

Beginning Swimming: Offered in the fall semester. A course designed for meeting the swim- 
ming requirement and for preparing the student for intermediate swimming. 
Fundamental Sports: Offered in the fall and spring. A course designed for the low skilled 
student where a particular type of activity can be given to meet his special needs. 
Basic Sports: Offered in the fall and spring semesters. A course designed to acquaint the 
medium skilled student with appropriate activities to prepare him for elective sports. 
Hygiene: Offered in the second half of the fall semester, and in the first half of the spring 
semester. A course designed to meet the health knowledge requirement and to guide the 
student to a more healthful way of life. 

Courses in Elective Sports Area 

All courses offered as elective sports are classified as Team Sports, Aquatics, Recreational 
Sports, Developmental Activities, or Varsity Sports. A student cannot repeat any course for 
credit. The courses are listed under their proper classification as follows. 



360 The General Catalog 

Team Sports: 

Basketball: Offered in the second half of the fall semester and in the first half of the spring 
semester. A course designed to cover the fundamentals of shooting, offensive and defensive 
strategy, history and rules. 

Football (touch): Offered in the first half of the fall semester. A course designed to cover 
the fundamentals of offensive and defensive play. 

Soccer: Offered in the first half of the fall semester. A course designed to acquaint the 
student with the fundamental skills and to provide out-of-door activity in a team sport. 

Softball: Offered in the second half of the spring semester. A course designed to include the 
fundamentals, history, and rules of the game. 

Speedball: Offered in the fall and spring semesters. A course designed to teach the funda- 
mentals, together with history and rules of squash. 

Volleyball: Offered in the first half of the fall semester, and in the entire spring semester. A 
course designed to include the fundamentals, history, and rules of the game. 



Aquatics: 

Swimming (Intermediate): Offered in both fall and spring semesters. A course designed to give 
the student competence in four basic strokes and two dives, preparatory to the Life Saving 
Program. 

Water Sports: Offered in fall and spring semesters. A course to teach the skills of water-polo 
and water basketball, plus improvement in stamina and skill necessary to improving ability. 
This course may not be taken by those students who have progressed beyond Senior Life 
Saving. 

Swimming (Senior Red Cross Life Saving): Offered in the fall and spring semesters. Prerequi- 
site: Intermediate Swimming or the equivalent. A course designed to qualify students for a 
Senior Red Cross Life Saving certificate and the possibility of a Water Safety Instructor's 
rating. 

Swimming (Red Cross Instructors): Offered in the fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite: A 
certificate for Senior Red Cross Life Saving. A course designed to qualify students for a 
Water Safety Instructor's rating. 



Recreational Sports: 

Angling: Offered in the first half of the fall semester, and the second half of the spring 
semester. A course designed to teach the fundamentals of spin, fly and bait casting, and an 
understanding of the game of skish. 

Badminton: Offered in the second half of the spring semester. A course designed to give the 
beginner a thorough knowledge of the basic strokes and a general knowledge of the history, 
rules and strategy of the game. 

Bowling (Ten Pins): Offered in the first and second half of the fall semester, and in the 
first half of the spring semester. Fundamentals of ball selection, grip, stance, and delivery are 
taught, together with rules, history, scoring and general theory of spare coverage. Students 
take turns setting pins. (Fee $2.50). 

Golf: Offered in the first half of the fall semester and in the second half of the spring 
semester. A course designed for the beginner; grip, stance, swing, and use of the various 
clubs, together with the history and etiquette of play. 

Handball (Four Wall): Offered in both fall and spring semesters. A course designed to include 
the fundamentals, together with history and rules of handball. 

Roller Skating: Offered during the second half of the fall semester and the first half of the 
spring semester. A course designed to teach the fundamentals of roller skating. Emphasis will 
be on body balance and control. 

Squash: Offered in both fall and spring semesters. A course designed to include the funda- 
mental skills, history, and rules of the game. 



Physics 361 

Tennis (Beginning): Offered in the first half of the fall semester and in the second half of 
the spring semester. A course designed to give the beginner a thorough knowledge of the 
history, rules and basic strategy of the game. 

Tennis (Advanced): Offered in the first half of the fall semester and in the second half 
of the spring semester. Prerequisite: Beginning Tennis or its equivalent. Basic strokes are 
reviewed and the more difficult strokes taught. Emphasis is placed upon strategy during play 
and upon a more factual knowledge of the game and court etiquete. 

Developmental Activities: 

Boxing: Offered in the second half of the fall semester. A course designed to acquaint the 
student with the fundamentals, history, and rules, with special emphasis on defensive tech- 
niques. 

Cross Country: Offered both fall and spring semesters. A course designed to develop knowl- 
edge, skill, and interest in cross-country. 

Gymnastics: Offered in the second half of the fall semester and first half of the spring 
semester. A course designed to include the fundamentals of gymnastics on the parallel bars, 
side horse, trampoline, and mats. 

Advanced Gymnastics: Offered in the fall semester. A course designed for those students 
who wish to progress beyond the beginning course in gymnastics. 

Track and Field: Offered during the first half of the fall semester and second half of the 
spring semester. A course designed to develop knowledge, skill and interest in track and 
field events. 

Wrestling: Offered in the first half of the fall semester and the first half of the spring 
semester. A course designed to give the fundamentals, history and rules of wrestling. 

Varsity Sports: 

Note: students may elect, with the approval of the coach, the following varsity sports: base- 
ball, basketball, cross-country track, football, golf, soccer, swimming, track, and wrestling. 



Physicol Sciences and Applied Mathematics 

PSM 100 Orientation (1-0) f 

Introduction to the fields of the physical sciences and mathematics. Required of all new 
freshmen in the school. Staff 



Physics 

Courses for Undergraduates 



PY 201, 202 General Physics 5 (3-4) f s; f s 

Corequisite: MA 201 

Required of sophomores in sciences, mathematics, and engineering. A study of classical and 
modern physics in which the analytical approach is employed. Emphasis is placed on the 
understanding of fundamental facts and principles, and on the solution of problems. The 
MKS system of units is used, and calculus is applied as needed. Demonstration lectures, recita- 
tions, problem drill and laboratory work are coordinated to give a working knowledge of 
basic principles. PY 201, mechanics, sound, and heat; PY 202, electricity, light, and modem 
physics. Staff 

PY 205, 206, 207 General Physics 4 (2-4) s; f; s 

Corequisite: M.A, 201 

Intended primarily for majors in departments of the School of Physical Sciences and Applied 

Mathematics. A study of classical and modern physics in which fundamental principles are 

emphasized. Calculus is used throughout as needed. Demonstrations and laboratory work 

tend to emphasize the modern aspects for a firm foundation for further study in the physical 

sciences. 



362 The General Catalog 

PY 211, 212 General Physics 4 (3-3) f s; s 

Prerequisite: MA 111 

A survey of general physics designed to provide a practical understanding of the fundamentals 
on which technology is based. Recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory work. PY 211, 
mechanics and heat; PY 212, sound, light, and electricity. Staff 

PY 221 College Physics 5 (5-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 111 

Required in certain curricula of the School of Agriculture. An introduction to the origins of 
physical science, the fundamental principals of physics, and the many applications to modern 
technology. The important concepts in the classical areas of mechanics, heat, sound, electricity 
and magnetism, and light are presented, along with a brief survey of modern atomic physics. 
Lectures and demonstrations with class participation. Staff 

PY 223 Astronomy and Astrophysics 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PY 212 or PY 202 

An introduction to descriptive and physical astronomy, with attention to the solar system, 
constellations, and star groups. The physical aspects of stars, such as brightness, temperature, 
energy and composition, are reviewed, along with the development of theories of galaxies and 
the universe. The nature of fusion sources of energies in stars is discussed. Mr. Snyder 

PY 300 Evaluation of Radiation Hazards 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisites: PY 202 and CH 102 

An introductory course on radiation and protection from the hazards of radiation designed 
principally for non-physics students. Fundamentals of radiation, radioactivity, and dosi- 
metry. Biological effects. Maximum permissible exposure limits and MPC in air and water. 
Shielding, handling methods, decontamination, waste disposal, and monitoring techniques. 

Mr. Story 

PY 401 Mechanics 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: PY 202; Corequisite: MA 301 

An intermediate course in theoretical mechanics. Dynamics of particles and rigid bodies with 
an introduction to advanced dynamics. Lagrange's equations and simple applications, Lorents 
transformations and an introduction to the theory of special relativity. Mr. Moss 

PY 402 Heat and Sound 4 (3-3) s 
Prerequisite: PY 302; Corequisite: MA 301 

An intermediate course in the principles of thermodynamics, kinetic theory, heat transfer, and 

vibrations. Mr. Moss 

PY 403 Electricity and Magnetism 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: PY 202; Corequisite: MA 301 

An intermediate course in the fundamentals of static and dynamic electricity, and electromag- 
netic theory. Mr. Doggett 

PY 404 Optics 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: PY 202; Corequisite: MA 301 

An intermediate course in physical and geometrical optics. Mr. Doggett 

PY 407 Introduction to Modern Physics 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 202 

A survey of the important developments in atomic and nuclear physics of this century. Among 
topics covered are: atomic and molecular structure, determination of properties of ions and 
fundamental particles, the origin of spectra, ion accelerators, and nuclear reactions. 

Staff 

PY 410 Nuclear Physics I 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 407 

An introduction to the properties of the nucleus, and the interaction of radiation with matter. 
A quantitative description is given of natural and artificial radioactivity, nuclear reactions, 
fission, fusion, and the structure of simple nuclei. Mr. Waltner 



Physics 363 

PY 491 Senior Research 3-3 

Prerequisite: Senior Honors program standing, except with special permission 
Investigations in physics under the guidance of staff members. Literature reviews, experi- 
mental measurements, or theoretical studies. A project report will be prepared. StafiE 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PY 501 Wave Mechanics 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PY 407, MA 511, and either PY 401 or PY 403 

An introduction to the foundations of quantum and wave mechanics, with solutions of the 
problem of the free particle, harmonic oscillator, rigid rotating molecule, and the hydrogen 
atom. Approximation methods are developed for more complex atomic systems. 

Mr. Cobb 

PY 503 Introduction to Theoretical Physics 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PY 401 or PY 403, MA 511 

An introductory course which offers preparation necessary for advanced graduate study, pre- 
sented from the viewpoint of vector and tensor calculus. Particle dynamics, Lagrange's equa- 
tions of motion, Hamilton's principle, mechanics of rigid bodies, topics in electromagnetic 
theory and relativity, with an elementary treatment of the motion of charged particles. 

Mr. Freyre 

PY 507 Advanced Atomic Physics 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PY 401 or PY 403, MA 511 

A study of atomic structure and spectra, with emphasis on the analysis of spectra. Topics in- 
clude the alkali spectra, multiplet structure, electron spin, hyperfine structure, moments, etc. 

Mr. Cobb 

PY 508 Ionization in Gases 3 (3-0) f 
Prerequisites: PY 401, PY 403, MA 301 

Statistical theory of matter; excitation and ionization in gases; mobilities and conductivities; 

processes at solid surfaces in ionized gases; characteristic forms of electrical discharges in 

gases. Mr. Bennett 

PY 509 Plasma Physics 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PY 508 

Individual and collective motion or charged particles in electric and magnetic fields and 
through ionized gases. Pinch effect, relativistic streams, conductivities, and runaway electrons. 
Astrophysical concepts and approximations. Properties of plasmas, including waves, confine- 
ment, instabilities and shocks, with applications. Mr. Bennett 

PY 510 Nuclear Physics II 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: PY 410 

The description and analysis of nuclear energy levels, meson theory, nuclear resonance, atomic 
and molecular magnetism, and cosmic radiation. Principles and experiments in neutron physics 
are discussed. In the laboratory work, emphasis is placed on gaining experience in indepen- 
dent research. Mr. Waltner 

PY 518 Radiation Hazard and Protection 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 410 

The hazards from external exposure to ionizing radiation arc evaluated, and the factors in- 
fluencing dosage due to internal exposure are investigated. Methods of providing protection 
are analyzed. Mr. Underwood 

PY 520 Physical Measurements in Radioactivity 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 410 

The principles of experimental measurements on radioactive materials are presented and 
demonstrated through laboratory work. Emphasis is placed on preparation of samples for 
precise quantitative study, detection of radiations, and analytical interpretation of experi- 
mental data. Mr. Lynn 



364 The General Catalog 

PY 530 (NE 530) Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Theory 3 (3-0) • 

Prerequisites: PY 410, MA 401 or MA 511 

The principles of neutron motion in matter, with emphasis on the analysis of the nuclear 
chain reactor. Slowing of neutrons, diffusion, space distributions of flux, conditions for criti- 
cality, group theories, and the time dependent behavior of fissionable assemblies. Staff 

PY 531 (NE 531) Nuclear Reoctor Laboratory 1 (0-3) f • 

Corequisites: PY 518, PY 530 

Observation and measurements of static and dynamic nuclear reactor behavior, the effective- 
ness of control and temperature, and correlation with theory. Experiments on the motion and 
detection of neutrons and gamma rays, with emphasis on the research uses of nuclear reactor 
radiations. Staff 

PY 541 Special Problems in Physics 1-3 credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Permission of department 

Study and research in special topics of classical and modern physics. Experimental measure- 
ments with emphasis on the treatment and interpretation of data, literature surveys, or 
theoretical investigations. Graduate Staff 

PY 552 Introduction to the Structure of Solids 3 (3-0) t 
Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 202; PY 403 and PY 407 are recommended 

Basic considerations of amorphous and crystalline solids, metals, conductors, and semi-con- 
ductors. Mr. Doggett 

PY 555 (MA 555) Principles of Astrodynamies 3 (3-0) 
Prerequisites: MA 511, either PY 401 or EM 812 

The differential equations of motion in two-body problems and their integrals; orbit theory; 

integrals of the n-body problem; differential equations of motion of natural and artificial 

satellites and their approximate solutions. Mr. Musen 

PY 601, 602 Advanced General Physics 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 503; Corequisite: MA 661 

Mathematical and theoretical approach to relationships between the various branches of 
physics, with applications to mechanical, electrical, optical, thermal, and vibratory problems. 
The restricted theory of relativity, electrodynamics, the theory of electrons, classical field 
theory, and the general theory of relativity. Mr. Davis 

PY 610 Advanced Nuclear Physics 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PY 501, PY 510 

Current hypotheses of nuclear structure and reactions including deuteron binding, neutron- 
proton scattering, the compound nucleus, stripping reactions, shell structure, beta decay, 
neutron resonances, and mesons. The use of neutrons in present-day nuclear research is 
emphasized. Staff 

PY 611 Quantum Mechanics 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PY 501, MA 512 

Theory of quantum mechanics with applications to atomic and molecular structure, scatter- 
ing phenomena, and a semi-classical treatment of the interaction of radiation with matter. 

Mr. Davis 

PY 612 Advanced Quantum Mechanics 3 (3-0) s 
Prerequisites: PY 601, PY 611 

Dirac's relativistic electron theory, elementary scalar and vector meson field theory. Introduc- 
tion to quantum electrodynamics and the general theory of quantized fields. Mr. Davis 

PY 617, 618 Principles of Health Physics Measurements 2 (1-3) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 510; Corequisites: PY 518, PY 520 recommended 

The physical principles underlying health physics measurements are studied both theoretically 
and experimentally. The purpose of the course is to develop in the student an insight into 
the principles and problems involved in measuring radiation and determining dose. 

Mr. Underwood 



Plant Pathology 365 

PY 619 (NE 619) Reactor Theory and Analysis I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: PY 530 

The theory of neutron slowing, resonance capture, Doppler effect, and thermal flux distri- 
butions in heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Analysis of reactor control by temperature, effects 
of localized and distributed absorbers, fission products, fuel consumption and production. 
One-velocity neutron transport theory. Mr. Murray 

PY 620 (NE 620) Nuclear Radiation Attenuation 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PY 530, MA 512 

Physical theory of the behavior of neutrons, gamma-rays and charged particles in matter. 
Calculation of source terms, attenuation factors, heating rates, geometrical transformations, 
radiation streaming and radioactive decay effects required in the design of nuclear radiation 
shields for reactors, accelerators, and space vehicles. Transport theory of gamma-ray and 
neutron transmission through matter. Analysis of experimental techniques for obtaining 
shielding data. Mr. Doggett 

PY 621 Kinetic Theory of Gases 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PY 501, PY 503, and MA 512 

The theory of molecular motion, including velocity and density distribution functions; the 
phenomena of viscosity, heat conduction, and diffusion; equations of state; fluctuations. 

Mr. Freyre 

PY 622 Statistical Mechanics 3 (3-0) s 
Prerequisites: PY 501, PY 503, MA 512, and PY 612 

A treatment of statistical mechanics from both the classical and quantum points of view. 

Development of thermodynamic theories and application to atomic systems. Mr. Freyre 

PY 630 (NE 630) Reactor Theory and Analysis II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PY 530 

The theory of neutron multiplication in uniform media, with several dimensions, regions, and 
neutron energy groups. Reactor control by absorbers, time dependent reactor behavior, matrix 
treatment and perturbation theory, neutron thermalization, energy dependent neutron trans- 
port theory, and multigroup machine methods. Mr. Murray 

PY 631, 632 Atomic and Molecular Spectra 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: PY 501 

Atomic models and coupling schemes; multiplet series, Zeemen, Paschen-Back and Stark 
effects; hyperfine structure and complex spectra; spectra of polyatomic molecules; infrared 
and Ramen spectra. Applications adopted to the interest of the students in the course. 

Staff 

PY 670 Seminor 1 (0-3) f s 

Literature surveys and written and oral presentation of papers on current topics in (a) general 
physics, (b) nuclear physics, (c) ionic phenomena of space physics, (d) plasma physics, (e) 
non-inertial space mechanics. Staff 

PY 690 Research Credits by arrangement 

Graduate students suflBdently prepared may undertake research in some selected field of 
Physics. Staff 

Plant Pathology 

Courses for Undergraduates 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

The nature and symptoms of disease in plants and the characteristics of important plant 
pathogenic nematodes, viruses, bacteria, and fungi are studied. An understanding of the 
important concepts and methods of disease control is developed, based on a knowledge of 
major types of plant diseases. Mr. Powell 



366 The General Catalog 

PP 318 Diseases of Forest Trees 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

The nature and symptoms of major types of tree diseases and the important characteristics 
of their casual agents are studied. Emphasis is placed on the influence of environmental fac- 
tors on disease development as well as the basic principles and methods of control. 

Mr. Kelman 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PP 500 Advanced Plant Pathology 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: PP 315 or equivalent 

An advanced study of the economic importance, symptoms, disease cycles, epiphytology, and 
control of major groups of plant diseases. Students who register for this course are also 
required to register for either PP 501 or PP 502, or they may register for both. 

Mr. Winstead 

PP 501 Advanced Plant Pathology Laboratory-Field Crops Diseases 1 (0-3) s 

Prerequisite: PP 315 or equivalent 

Laboratory course for students whose major interest is diseases of field crops to accompany 
lecture course in advanced plant pathology (PP 500). Diseases will be selected for study which 
are important on field crops. Either this course or PP 502 must be taken concurrently with 
PP 500. Mr. Kline 

PP 502 Advanced Plant Pathology Laboratory-Horticulture Crops 1 (0-3) t 
Diseases 

Prerequisite: PP 315 or equivalent 

Laboratory course for students whose major interest is diseases of horticulture crops to 

accompany lecture course in advanced plant pathology (PP 500). Diseases will be selected 
for study which are important on fruit, ornamental and vegetable crops. Either this course 

or PP 501 must be taken concurrently with PP 500. Mr. Winstead 

PP 503 Diagnosis of Plant Diseases Summer Session 3 (1-4) 

Prerequisites: One advanced course in Plant Pathology, permission of instructor 

A study of techniques used in plant disease diagnosis with emphasis on diagnostic value of 

signs and symptoms for certain types of diseases. Consideration will be given to major sources 

of descriptive information on plant pathogens and the use of keys for the identification of 

fungi. 

(Offered in 1962 and alternate years) Mr. Hebert 

Courses for Graduates Only 

PP 601 Phytopathology I 4 (1-6) f 

Prerequisites: PP 315, permission of the instructor 

A study of the principles of phytopathological research. The course is designed to apply the 
classical scientific method to disease investigation. Exercises will include appraising disease 
problems, reviewing literature, laboratory and greenhouse experiments, and the evaluation 
and presentation of data. Mr. Apple 

PP 602 Phytopathology If 4 (2-6) s 

Prerequisites: PP 315, permission of the instructor 

The basic concepts of the etiology, pathology, epiphytology, and control of plant diseases. 

Mr. Nusbaum 

PP 604 Plant Parasitic Nematodes 2 (1-3) f 

Prerequisite: PP 315 

A study of morphology, anatomy, physiology, and taxonomy of plant parasitic nematodes. 
Methods of isolating nematodes from soil and plant parts and other laboratory techniques 
used in the study and identification of nematodes will be considered. 

Mrs. Triantaphyllou 



Plant Pathology 367 

PP 605 Plant Virology 3 (1-6) f 

Prerequisites: PP 315, GN 411, and a course in organic chemistry 

A study of plant viruses including effects of host plants, transmission, classification, methods 
of purification, determination of properties, chemical nature, structure, and multiplication. 
(Offered in 1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Hebert 

PP 607 (GN 607) Genetics of Fungi 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: GN 512 or equivalent, permission of instructor 

Review of major contributions in fungus genetics with emphasis on principles and theories 

that have evolved in recent developments, 

(Offered in 1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Nelson 

PP 608 History of Phytopathology 1 (1-0) f 

Prerequisites: PP 315, permission of instructor 

Development of the science of phytopathology from its early beginning to the early part of 

the 20th century. 

(Offered in 1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ellis 

PP 609 Current Phytopathologicol Research under Field Conditions 2 (1-3) t 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Study of concepts involved, procedures used, and evaluation made in current phytopathological 
research by Plant Pathology staff. Visits to various Research Stations will be made by the 
class. Mr. Clayton 

PP 611 Nematode Diseases of Plants 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisite: PP 604 

A study of plant diseases caused by nematodes. Special consideration will be given to host- 
parasite relationships, host ranges, and life cycles of the more important economic species. 
Principles and methods of control will be considered. Mr. Sasser 

PP 612 Plant Pathogenesis 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: PP 500 

A study of interactions of pathogens and suscept plants. The following major topics will be 
considered: hydrolytic enzyme systems involved in tissue disintegration; role of enzymes, poly- 
saccharides, and toxins in wilting phenomena; mode of action of toxins in altering plant 
metabolism; role of growth regulators in hypertrophic responses; alterations in respiration 
and other physiological processes during pathogenesis; and nature and biochemical basis for 
disease resistance. 
(Offered in 1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Kelman 

PP 615 Research in Plant Pathology Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor 

Original research in plant pathology. Graduate Staff 

PP 625 Seminar in Plont Pathology 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Consent of seminar chairman 

Discussion of phytopathological topics selected and assigned by seminar chairman. 

Graduate Staff 



Political Science 

(See History and Politicol Science) 



368 The General Catalog 

Poultry Science 

Courses for Undergraduates 

PC 201 Poultry Production 4 (3-3) f s 

Principles of broiler, market eggs, hatching egg and turkey productions. Classes, breeds and 
varieties identification of chickens and turkeys. Breeding, incubation, raising, housing, feeding, 
and parasite control, marketing of chickens, eggs and turkeys. Messrs. Brown, Martin 

PC 301 Poultry Quality Evaluations 2 (1-3) f 

Prerequisite: PO 201 

Elective for others with permission of instructor. 

Evaluation of poultry for production and standard qualities; determining market, poultry and 



eggs. 



Mr. Brown 



PO 351 Poultry Grading 1 (0-3) f 

Prerequisite: PO SOI 

Laboratory experience in determining federal grades of poultry and eggs. Mr. Brown 

PO 401 Poultry Diseases 4 (3-3) • 

The major infectious, non-infectious and parasitic diseases of poultry are studied with respect 
to economic importance, etiology, susceptibility, dissemination, symptoms and lesions. Emphasis 
is placed upon practices necessary for the prevention, control and treatment of each disease. 

Mr. Craig 

PO 402 Commercial Poultry Enterprises 4 (3-2) s 

Required of majors in Poultry Science 
Elective for others with permission of instructor. 

Principles of incubation of chicken and turkey eggs; hatchery management; organization and 
development of plans for the operation and maintenance of a commercial poultry farm for 
meat and egg production; study of the types of buildings, equipment and methods of man- 
agement currently employed by successful poultrymen in North Carolina. Problem. 

Mr. Brown 



PO 403 Poultry Seminar 1 (1-0) f • 

Current topics and problems relating to Poultry Science and to the poultry industry are 

assigned for oral report and discussion. Two semesters. Staff 

PO 404 (FS 404) Poultry Products 3 (2-3) f 
Prerequisites: ZO 103, CH 101 
Required of majors in Poultry Science. 
Elective for others with permission of instructor. 

Selection, processing, grading, and packaging poultry meat and eggs. Factors involved in preser- 
vation of poultry meat and eggs. Mr. Fromm 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PO 520 Poultry Breeding 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: ON 411 
Required of Poultry Science majors. 

Application of genetic principles to poultry breeding, considering physical traits and physio- 
logical characteristics— feather patterns, egg production, hatchability, growth, body conforma- 
tion and utility. Mr. Martin 



Product Design 369 

PO 521 Poultry Nutrition 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: CH 220 or 221 

Required of majors in Poultry Science; elective for others. 
Elective for others with permission of instructor. 

A study of proteins, carbohydrates, fats, minerals and vitamins required for growth, egg pro- 
duction and reproduction in the chicken and turkey. Symptoms and lesions induced by nutri- 
tional deficiencies. Compounding different types of poultry mashes and methods of feeding 
these mashes. The production of certain vitamin and mineral deficiencies in chicks for ob- 
servation and examination. Mr. Kelly 

PO 522 Endocrinology of the Fowl 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 501 or equivalent 

The endocrine system is studied with respect to its physiological importance in such intricate 
processes as metabolism, growth and reproduction. Emphasis is placed upon this system for the 
fowl, but mammalian examples are also used to illustrate basic concepts of the science. The 
interests of the students will be considered in the selection of illustrative material. 

Mr. Garren 



Courses for Graduates Only 

Graduate courses may not be offered if registration for the course is too low or if the faculty 
or facilities become unaxfailable. 

PO 602 Advanced Poultry Nutrition 3 (0-6) arrange 

Prerequisites: PO 521, CH 551 or equivalent 

Students taking this course will conduct a research problem in poultry nutrition. This problem 
will involve the designing and carrying out of microbiological and chick experiments. The 
students will obtain practice in correlating results obtained in microbiological and chick as- 
says. Mr. Hill 

PO 611 Poultry Research 1-6 (arrange) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Appraisal of present research, critical study of some particular problem involving original in- 
vestigation. Problems in poultry breeding, nutrition, disease endocrinology, hematology or 
microbiology. Credits: A maximum of six is allowed toward a master's degree. 

Graduate StaflE 

PO 613 Special Problems in Poultry Science 1-6 (arrange) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Specific problems of study are assigned in various phases of poultry science. Graduate Staff 



Product Design 



PD 201, 202 Product Design and Orientation 4 (3-6) f t 

Prerequisite: DN 102 

Required of second year students in Product Design 

Elementary problems in form and function. Transitional implications of handcrafted and mass- 
produced objects, in various materials. Demonstrations by specialists in graphics, photography, 
rendering, modeling, typography, and technical illustration. Visits to design departments 
of local industries. Mr. Baron 

PD 301, 302 Product Design 6 (3-12) f s 

Prerequisites: PD 202, PY 212 

Required of third year students in Product Design 

Manufacturing and structural considerations in the design of a wide range of products. 

Mr. Papanek 



370 The General Catalog 

PD 331,332 Moteriols and Processes 3 (3-0) f s 

Required of third year students in Product Design 

Study of the basic materials of industry, from raw materials and their properties to fabrication 

techniques, design criteria and potential. 

PD 401, 402 Advanced Product Design 6 (3-12) f s 

Prerequisites: PD 302. PD 332 

Continuation of product design into more complex systems. Emphasis is placed on functional 
innovation and integration of form and structure. Thorough analysis of fabrication by models 
and sketches. Mr. Macomber 

PD 422 Office and Industrial Practice 2 (2-0) i 

Prerequisite: PD 302 

Required for graduation in Product Design 

Study of the ethics, organization, and procedures of professional product design practice; patent 

law. 

PD 441, 442 Design Analysis 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

Required of fourth year students in Product Design 

Seminar on imaginative problem solving. Individual and group operational techniques in the 

spectrum of creative thought. Mr. Papanek 

PD 501 Advanced Product Design 8 (3-12) f 

Prerequisite: PD 402 

Required of fifth year students in Product Design 

Continuation of emphasis on new product design and development, with reference to current 

developments in automatic fabrication and assembly. Mr. Papanek 

PD 502 Product Design Thesis 9 (3-18) s 

Prerequisites: PD 501, PD 442, IE series 

A one semester project chosen by the student in his area of major interest, with faculty guidance. 
Independent research and development of functional contribution, including complete pro- 
gramming of manufacture and distribution systems appropriate to the design. 

Mr. Papanek 



Psychology 

(See Education) 

Recreation and Park Adminisfration 

(See Education) 

Rural Sociology 

*Courses for Undergraduates 

RS 204 North Carolina Rural Life 2 (2-0) f s 

Introduction to the specific patterns of rural living in North Carolina; structure and function 
of the groups in which North Carolina rural people participate; major social institutions and 
their related problems; and organized efiEorts to improve community life in the State. Staff 

• Additional courses, suitable for rural sociology majors and graduate students, are listed in the 
offerings of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. Other sociology courses especially suitable for 
advanced students and graduates are offered by the Department of Sociology and Anthropology of the 
University at Chapel Hill. 



Rural Sociology 371 

RS 301 Sociology of Rural Life 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisite: Completion of the freshman year 

A systematic sociological analysis of the characteristics, institutions and problems of rural life. 
Part I is a brief description of the basic concepts, the theoretical framework and the method 
of analysis of institutions and problems. Part 11 consists of systematic analyses of the major 
social institutions and their respective problems. Part III portrays the role of the community aa 
an area of institutional functioning and societal integration. Stall 

RS 321 Introduction to Social Research 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisite: RS 301 

Designed to give tlie student a basic understanding of the methods of sociological research. 
Reviews the scientific method and its application to the design of social research including the 
collection, analysis, and interpretation of social data. Appropriate ways of presenting the 
findings and of making the greatest use of the data are presented. Critical and objective thinking 
are stressed throughout the course. Messrs. Young and Mayo 

RS 322 Introduction to Rural Social Work 3 (3-0) • 

Prerequisite: RS 301 or permission of the instructor 

Constructed to acquaint the preprofessional student with the subject matter of social work as 
well as its related professional fields. Attention is given to three major areas: (1) case work in 
various settings. (2) group work, and (3) community organization. Public and private agencies 
which employ persons trained in social work are studied. Mr. Mayo 

RS 441 Rural Social Pathology 3 (3-0) ff 

Prerequisite: RS 301 or permission of the instructor 

A study of major social problems in modern society: physical and mental health, family insta- 
bility, crime and penology, and minority group problems. A framework for analysis and under- 
standing is presented and stressed throughout including a positive approach for prevention. 

Mr. Mayo 

RS 442 Rural Social Structure 3 (3-0) i 

Prerequisite: RS 301 or permission of the instructor 

Social structure is viewed in its two major dimensions: (1) vertically through the concepts 
of social stratification; and (2) horizontally as a set of basic social institutions interacting by 
means of a system of concrete social organizations. Particular attention is given to the place 
of the rural segment in the total social system. The bases of social cohesion which permit di- 
versity within a functioning whole are examined. Mr. McCann 

* Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

RS 511 Raral Population Problems 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: RS 301 

A study of population growth, rates of change and distribution. Considerable attention is 
given to the functional roles of population, i. e., age, sex, race, residence, occupation, marital 
status and education. The dynamic aspects of population are stressed: fertility, mortality and 
migration. Population policy is analyzed in relation to national and international goals. A 
world view is stressed throughout. Mr. Mayo 

RS 512 Rural Family Living 3 (3-0) ■ 

Prerequisite: RS 301 

Values, patterns and levels of rural family living. Differentials and factors related thereto in 
the world, the nation and North Carolina. Analysis of selection problems, programs, policies 
and methods of study. Mr. Hamilton 

RS 513 Community Organization 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: RS 301 

Community organization is viewed as a process of bringing about desirable changes in com- 
munity life. Community needs and resources available to meet these needs are studied. Demo- 
cratic processes in community action and principles of community organization are stressed 
along with techniques and procedures. The roles of leaders, both lay and professional, in com- 
munity development are analyzed. Mr. Mayo 



* See footnote on page 370. 



372 The General Catalog 

RS 523 Sociological Analysis of Agricultural Land Tenure Systems 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

A systematic sociological analysis of the major agricultural land tenure systems of the world 
with major emphasis on the problems of family farm ownership and tenancy in the United 
States. Mr. Hamilton 

RS 534 (HI 534) Farmers' Movements 3 (3-0) i 

Prerequisite: Three hours of Sociology 

A history of agricultural organizations and movements in the United States and Canada prin- 
cipally since 1865, emphasizing the Grange, the Farmers' Alliance, the Populist Revolt, the 
Farmers' Union, the Farm Bureau, the Equity societies, the Non-partisan League, cooperative 
marketing, government programs and present problems. Mr. Noblin 

RS 541 Social Agencies and Programs 3 (3-0) ■ 

Prerequisite: Three hours of Sociology 

Study of social agencies and programs and their implementation through specific organizations 
in dynamic relation with the people whom they serve. Consideration is given to the relation 
of these agencies and programs to community structure and forces in rural society; coordina- 
tion of the several types of agencies and programs; professional leadership in the local com- 
munity; and problems of stimulating local leadership and participation. Mr. Mayo 

Courses for Graduates Only 

RS 611 Research Methods in Sociology 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Designed to give the student a mature insight into the nature of scientific research in sociology. 
Assesses the nature and purpose of research designs, the interrelationship of theory and research, 
the use of selected techniques and their relation to research designs, and the use of modem 
tabulation equipment in research. Mr. McCann 

RS 621 Rural Social Psychology 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Treats the genetic development of the rural personality and the interrelationship of the in- 
dividual and the rural society. Studies the social psychological factors related to rural leader- 
ship, morale, social organization and social change, and examines the attitudes and opinions of 
rural people on current local and national issues. Mr. McCann 

RS 631 Population Analysis 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Methods of describing, analyzing and presenting data on human populations: distribution, 

characteristics, natural increase, migration and trends in relation to resources. Mr. Hamilton 

RS 632 Rural Fomily 3 (3-0) ff 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Emphasis is placed on the development of an adequate sociological frame of reference for 
family analysis; on discovering both the uniquely-cultural and common-human aspects of the 
family by means of cross-cultural comparisons; on historical explanations for variability in 
American families with especial concern for the rural family; and on analyzing patterns of 
family stability and effectiveness. Mr. Hamilton 

RS 633 The Rural Community 3 (3-0) • 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

The rural community is viewed in sociological perspective as a functional entity. A method of 
analysis is presented and applied to eight "dimensions," with emphasis on the unique types of 
understanding to be derived from measuring each dimension. Finally, the effect of change on 
community integration and development is analyzed. Mr. Mayo 

RS 641 Statistics in Sociology 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ST 513 

The application of statistical methods in sociological research. Emphasis on selecting appropriate 
models, instruments and techniques for the more frequently encountered problems and forms 
of data. Mr. Hamilton 



Sociology 373 

RS 642 Research in Rural Sociology Credits by arrangement 

(Maximum of six credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of chairman of graduate study committee. 

Planning and execution of research, and preparation of manuscript under superrision of 

graduate committee. 

RS 653 Theory and Development of Rural !k>ciology 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Required of all master's and doctoral candidates in Rural Sociology and recommended for all 
graduate minors. Designed to meet two objectives: (1) to introduce the student to the sudy 
of current sociological theory and (2) to survey events and trends in the historical development 
of rural sociology. Mr. Hamilton 

RS 671 Seminar Credits by arrangement 

Appraisal of current literature; presentation of research papers by students; progress reports on 
departmental research; review of developing research methods and plans; reports from scienti- 
fic meetings and conferences; other professional matters. (A maximum of three credits is al- 
lowed toward the master's degree, and six credits toward the doctorate.) Graduate Staff 



Social Studies 

SS 301, 302 Science and Civilization 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: For engineering students, ENG 205, HI 205, EC 205; for others, permission of 

the department 
An examination of the major concepts, methods and values that characterize modem thought 
in the fields of physical science, the humanities and the social sciences. The course utilizes the 
student's previous training, plus materials from the history and philosophy of science and the 
history of technology to demonstrate the essential interrelatedness of scientific, social, and 
aesthetic activity. 

SS 491, 492 Contemporary Issues 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: For engineering students, SS 301, 302; for others, permission of the department 
This course deals with concrete problems as they arise from day to day in the world of public 
affairs. These problems are studied and discussed in the context of a search for a more realistic 
definition of the limits of freedom and authority. Text materials are books, magazines and 
newspapers. 



Sociology 

(Also tee Anthropology) 

Courses for Undergraduates 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 (3-0) f s 

Introduction to the scientific study of man's behavior in relation to other men, the general laws 
affecting the organization of such relationships and the effects of social life on human personali- 
ty and behavior. 

SOC 301 Human Behavior 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the effects of social interaction upon individual behavior and personality; collective 
attitudes and behavior as products of group experience; analysis of fashions and fads, crowds, 
mobs, pubUcs, social movements. 

SOC 302 Public Relations and Modern Society 3 (3-0) f s 

The development and composition of social groups and the processes involved in group or- 
ganization. These are analyzed in terms of the expanding functions of mass communication in 
contemporary society. 



374 The General Catalog 

SOC 303 Current Social Problems 3 (3-0) f s 
Study of the social and cultural aspects of specific problems such as crime, divorce, race con- 
flict, illness, poverty, housing, recreation and personality adjustment to demonstrate the basic 
integration of society and community life. 

SOC 304 Contemporary Family Life 3 (3-0) f • 

The social organization of the family with special attention to socialization, marital choice, 
kinship relations, and the social changes affecting family structure and functions. 

SOC 305 Race Relations 3 (3-0) f s 

Analysis of race relationships both in the United States and throughout the world with par- 
ticular emphasis on factors producing the changes taking place at the present time. 

SOC 306 Criminology 3 (3-0) f i 

The study of causation, treatment, prevention, and control of criminality and juvenile de- 
linquency. Special emphasis is placed on socio-cultural theories of causation and on the 
examination of court and correctional systems for adults and juveniles. Arranged field trips. 

SOC 401 Human Relations in Industrial Society 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of instructor 

Studies in the sociology of occupations, professions and work, with special attention to human 

relations in industrial plants and other work situations. 

SOC 402 Urban Sociology 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: SOC 202 and permission of instructor 

A study of the factors in the growth of cities; the relationship between the design of cities 
and their social organization; detailed analysis of new developments in the serving of human 
needs. City and regional planning. 

SOC 411 Community Relationships 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: SOC 202 and permission of instructor 

A survey of the institutions, organizations, and agencies found in modern communities; social 
problems and conditions with which they deal; their interrelationship and the trend toward 
over-all planning. 

SOC 412 Introduction to Social Work 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: SOC 202 and permission of instructor 

A course designed to acquaint students with the various types of public and private social work 
and with remedial and preventive programs in applied sociology, social psychiatry, health, 
public welfare, and recreation. 

SOC 414 Social Structure 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: Six hours in Sociology and permission of instructor 

Studies of the major social institutions and systems of stratification; the organization of social 
systems as, for example, religion, education, and government; the functions of such structural 
components as age and sex groups, vocational and professional groups, and social classes. 

SOC 416 Research Methods 3 (3-0) f « 

Prerequisites: Nine hours in Sociology and permission of instructor 

An analysis of the principle methods of social research; the development of experiments; 
schedules and questionnaires; the measurement of behavior. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

SOC 501 Leadership 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301 or equivalent 

A study of leadership in various fields of American life; analysis of the various factors as- 
sociated with leadership, with particular attention given to recreational, scientific and execu- 
tive leadership problems. 



Soil Science 375 

SOC 502 Society, Culture, and Personolity 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: SOC 202. SOC 301 or equivalent 

Human personality from its origins in primary groups through its development in secondary 
contacts and its ultimate integration with social norms. Emphasis is placed upon the normal 
personality and the adjustment of the individual to our society and our culture. Dynamics of 
personality and character structure are analyzed in terms of the general culture patterns and 
social institutions of society. 

SOC 505 The Sociology of Rehabilitation 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301 or equivalent 

The course stresses the social and cultural implications of the rehabilitation approach. Em- 
phasis is placed upon the social and personal problems of physically and mentally handi- 
capped persons. The interrelationships of the major social environments are considered at 
length in this regard. Objectives of the rehabilitation processes are analyzed in terms of the 
sociology of work. A major portion of the course is devoted to rehabilitation as a profession, 
particular attention being given to the diverse roles of specialists in this field. 

SOC 510 Industrial Sociology 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301 or equivalent 

Industrial relations analyzed as group behavior with a complex and dynamic network of rights, 
obligations and rules; the social system as an interdependent part of total community life; 
background and functioning of industrialization studied as social and cultural phenomena; 
analysis of specific problems of industry. 

SOC 511 Social Theory 3 (3-0) f < 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours in Sociology, or equivalent work in related fields, and per- 
mission of instructor. 

The study of social theories from the earliest recorded thinkers to those of modern times; the 
evolution of theories of the individual, groups, culture, community, and society; the modem 
development of sociology and anthropology, and interpretive systems accompanying these 
developments. 

SOC 515 Research in Applied Sociology 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301 or equivalent 

Individual research problems in applied fields of sociology, such as problems of the family, 

population and social work; rural- urban relations; student success; American leadership. 



Soil Science 

Courses for Undergraduates 

SSC 200 Soils 4 (3-3) f t 

Prerequisite: CH 103 or CH 107. MIG 120 is recommended but not required 
The fundamental properties of soils and their relation to proper soil management. Geological 
information important to an understanding of soils and agriculture is presented for a better 
understanding of the interrelationship which exists between soils and management. 

Mr. Younts 

SSC 302 Soils and Plant Growth 4 (3-3) t 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, BO 103. PY 211 

An examination of the fundamental chemical, physical and microbiological characteristics of 
soils, as related to crop production. The chemical and mineralogical composition of soils; ioQ 
exchange, soil reaction and the solubilities of plant nutrients; transformations between organic 
and inorganic forms of plant nutrients; water and air relations in soils; lecture— demonstrations 
will be used to illustrate fundamental soil properties and to acquaint students with methods 
used in the study of soils. Mr. McCollum 



376 The General Catalog 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, BO 103 

History of plant nutrition and soil fertility. Plant nutrition and growth as related to crop fer- 
tilization. Fertilizer materials, their manufacture, properties and usage. Fertilizer practices 
35 related to a sound soil management program. Mr. Younts 

SSC 452 Soil Classification 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: SSC 200 

The processes involved in the origin of soil and its properties are explained. Logical schemes of 
•oil classification and soil management are developed based upon soil profile properties as 
operational criteria. The laboratories and field trips are designed to teach the student how 
to recognize certain soil profile properties and inferences which may be drawn from them. 

Mr. Cooke 

SSC 461 Soil Conservation and Management 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: SSC 200 or permissicn of instructor 

The history and status of erosion and fertility conditions; the economic and social aspects of 
soil conservation; the effects of climatic factors, vegetation (forest, sod crops, cover crops and 
rotations), soil properties, and other management practices on soil conservation and fertility 
maintenance. Mr. Lutz 

SSC 480 Senior Seminar 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in the School of Agriculture 

A student participation course in which the student will prepare and present thorough and 

documented discussions of important soil topics. Staff 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

SSC 511 Soil Physics 4 (3-3) f 
Prerequisites: SSC 200 and PY 212 

Physical constitution and analyses; soil structure, soil water, soil air and soil temperature in 

relation to plant growth. Mr. Lutz 

SSC 522 Soil Chemistry 4 (3-3) t 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, SSC 555 and CH 433 or permission of instructor. 

A consideration of the chemical and colloidal properties of clay and soil systems, including 
ion exchange and retention, soil solution reactions, solvation of clays, and electrokinetic pro- 
perties of clay-water systems. 
(Offered in 1964 and alternate years thereafter) Mr. Weed 

SSC 524 Moss Spectrometry 2 (1-3) s 

Prerequisites: SSC 302 and CH 433 or permission of instructor 

An examination of theoretical and analytical aspects of mass spectrometry and stable isotopic 

techniques; application of these methods to biochemical research. 

(Offered in 1963 and alternate years thereafter) Mr. Volk 

SSC 532 Soil Microbiology 3 (3-0) I 

Prerequisites: SSC 302, BO 312 and CH 220 

The more important microbiological processes that occur in soils; decomposition of organic 
materials, ammonification, nitrification, and nitrogen fixation. 
(Offered in 1963 and alternate years thereafter) Mr. Bartholomew 

SSC 541 Soil Fertility 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: SSC 302 and SSC 341 

Soil conditions affecting plant growth and the chemistry of soil and fertilizer interrelationships. 

Factors affecting the availability of nutrients. Methods for measuring nutrient availability. 

Mr. Ramprath 



Soil Science 377 

SSC 551 Soil Morphology, Genesis ond Classification (3-0) 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, SSC 302, or SSC 341 and MIG 120 

Morphology: study of concepts of soil horizons and soil profiles and chemical, physical and 

mineralogical parameters useful in characterizing them. Genesis: critical study of soil forming 

factors and processess. Classification; critical evaluation of historical development and present 

concepts of soil taxonomy with particular reference to great soil groups as well as discussion 

of logical basis of soil classification. 

(Offered in 1962 and alternate years thereafter) Mr. McCracken 

SSC 553 Soil Mineralogy 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, SSC 341 and MIG 330 or permission of instructor 

Composition, structure, classification, identification, origin, occurrence, and significance of soil 
minerals with emphasis on primary weatherable silicates, layer silicate clays, and sesquioxides. 

Messrs. McCracken and Weed 

SSC 560 North Carolina Soils and Their Management 3 (Summer) 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, SSC 302 or SSC 341 

Field studies of selected soil series in the Coastal Plain, Piedmont and Mountain areas of 

North Carolina. Discussion of management practices that should be associated with the various 

soils under different types of farming. 

(Offered in Summer 1963 and alternate years thereafter). Messrs. McCracken, Fitts and Spain 

SSC 570 Special Problems Credits by arrangement. 

Prerequisites: SSC 200 and SSC 302 

Special problems in various phases of soils. Problems may be selected or will be assigned. 

Emphasis will be placed on review of recent and current research. Staff 

Courses for Graduate Students Only 

SSC 622 Physical and Chemical Properties of Soils 0-4 

Prerequisites: SSC 511, SSC 522, CH 433, MA 301 or permission of instructor 
An examination in depth of current ideas concerning the physics and chemistry of soil and 
clay systems. Topics will include ion exchange, molecular adsorption, electrokinetics, relations 
between mineral structures and their physical and chemical properties, and the properties of 
adsorbed water. Emphasis will be determined by student interest and by current literature. 
(Offered in 1963 and alternate years thereafter). Messrs. Miller and Weed 

SSC 651 Pedology 2 or 3-0 (By arrangement) 

Prerequisites: SSC 522 and SSC 511 

A critical study of current theories and concepts in soil genesis and morphology; detailed 
study of soil taxonomy. Topics include weathering and clay mineral genesis as related to soil 
morphology and genesis, functional analyses of soil genesis, properties of and processes re- 
sponsible for soil profiles formed under various sets of soil forming factors, classification theory 
and logic as applied to soil classification, structure of soil classification schemes. Any of these 
topics may be emphasized at the expense of the others according to interests of students. 
(Offered in 1964 and alternate years thereafter). Mr. McCracken 

SSC 672 Soil Properties and Plant Development 0-4 

Prerequisites: CH 551, SSC 522 or equivalents 

A detailed examination of the effects of soil factors in the development of crop plants. Segments 
of the course will treat (1) soil transformation processes of both organic and inorganic con- 
stituents, (2) concepts of nutrient availability and (3) the relation of plant development in- 
dices to specific soil properties. 
(Offered in 1964 and alternate years thereafter). Messrs. Jackson, Bartholomew and Davey 

SSC 680 Seminar 1 (1-0) f • 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soil Science 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research and special problems of interest to agronomists 

reviewed and discussed. 

A maximum of two credits is allowed toward the master's degree, but any number toward 

the doctorate. Graduate Staff 



378 The General Catalog 

SSC 690 Research Credits by orrongement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soil Science 

A maximum of six crediu is allowed toward the master's degree, but any number toward 

the doctorate. Graduate Staff 



Statistics 

(See Experimental Statistics) 

Textiles 

Courses for Undergraduates 

Textile Technology 

TX 221 Fundamentals of Textiles 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 101 or MA 111, or equivalent 

Required of students in all Textile curricula 

Nomenclature, flow of processes through weaving, yarn numbering systems, basic calculations 

of machinery constants, textile production, and yarn and fabric structures. Two 1-hour lectures 

and one 2-hour laboratory period per week, Messrs. Lassiter, Moser 

TX 261 Fabric Structure 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 221 

Required of students in all Textile curricula 

A study of the fundamental principles of fabric construction and weave formation of selected 
staple fabrics. Laboratory instruction is given in physical analysis and design techniques es- 
sential to the development of technical specifications for the production of woven fabrics. Two 
1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week, Messrs. Berry, Klibbe 

TX 271 Upholstery Fabrics 2 (2-0) i 
Required of students in Furniture Manufacturing 
Textile students may not take this course for degree credit. 

A study of the basic principles of textile manufacturing and structure of woven fabrics, 
identification of classic decorative fabrics used for upholstered furniture coverings, with em- 
phasis on nomenclature and physical properties and textile trade customs. Two 1-hour lecture 
periods per week Mr. Moser 

TX 281 Fiber Quality 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 221 

Required of students in all Textile curricula 

A study of the physical, chemical and aesthetic properties of the major textile fibers. Included 
are methods of measuring fiber properties and interpretation of test results, complete analysis 
of typical stress-strain curves, influence of moisture on physical properties, and fiber identifi- 
cation. Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Hamby, Wiggins 

TX 303 Fiber and Yarn Technology 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 281 

Required of all students in the Textile Technology curriculum. 

Technological and scientific concepts of fiber and yarn structures and modifications resulting 

from processing. For all systems, the opening, cleaning and carding actions; blending of 

fibers stressing intimacy, methods, effectiveness, and influence on product; yam structure as a 

factor of blend, fiber distribution, twist in its many ramifications, spinning limits; composite 

yarn structures; bulk and yarn coverage; drafting methods, types, and limits. Three 1-hour 

lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. Messrs. Hamby, Pardue, Lassiter 



Textiles 379 

TX 304 Fiber and Yarn Technology 4 (3-2) f ■ 

Prerequisite: TX 303 

Required of students in Fiber and Yarn Technology and General Textiles 
Elective for others. 

Technological and economic aspects of fiber and yam processing including; packaging, pro- 
duction and eflBciency levels; specialized yarn processes such as combing with economic justi- 
fications; design and use of specialty novelty yarns; economical and mechanical limitations of 
textile equipment. Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Stuckey, Pardue, Hamby 

TX 327 Textile Testing 4 (3-2) t t 

Prerequisites: TX 303, TX 365, ST 361 
Required of students in all Textile curricula 

Quality control methods for textile processing, with emphasis on the measurement by labora- 
tory instruments and techniques, and including a study of the mechanical and natural in- 
fluences involved. Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Hamby, Stuckey 

TX 365 Fabric Technology 4 (S-2) f s 

Prerequisites: TX 261, TX 281 

Required of students in the Textile Technology curriculum 

Geometry of fabrics; properties of fabrics dependent on the weave, geometrical configurations 

and yarn properties, such as compressional resilience, air and water permeability, water re- 

pellency, creasing tendencies, abrasion properties, hand, and drape. Mechanical properties 

of fabrics; transmission of heat, moisture, and air. Yarn additives and treatments; slashing and 

warp preparation, materials, and techniques. Non-woven structures. Three 1-hour lectures and 

one 2-hour laboratory period per week. Messrs. Berry, Porter 

TX 366 Fabric Technology 4 (3-2) f • 

Prerequisite: TX 365 

Required of students in Fabric Technology and General Textiles 
Elective for others 

Technology and economic aspects of fabric construction, design, and production. The classical 
weaves, their design, inherent uses, production techniques, and types of looms required. Mar- 
keting methods, with Worth Street and other trade rules and regulations. The loom as a pro- 
duction unit: types, nomenclature, basic and special mechanisms. Mill balance. Fabric defects. 
Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. Messrs. Moser, Berry 

TX 430 Continuous Filament Yarns 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 303 

Required of Students in Fiber and Yarn Technology and Knitting Technology. 

Elective for others 

A study of properties and processes applicable only to filament yarns such as texturizing and 

bulking. Detailed studies of throwing systems, engineering requirements of equipment, and 

yarn property changes resulting from processing. Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory 

period per week. Mr. Wiggins 

TX 436 Staple Fiber Processing 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 303 

Required of students in Fiber and Yarn Technology. 

Elective for others 

A study of special systems of processing long staple, natural and man-made fibers, including 

woolen, worsted, direct spinning. Turbo Stapler, or Pacific Converter, and silver to yarn 

methods. New concepts and research findings as applied to all yarn processes. Two 1-hour 

lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. Mr. Pardue 

TX 478 Design and Weaving 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 366 

Required of students in Fabric Technology 

Elective for others 

Advanced study of special weave formations and the techniques and equipment necessary to 

form these fabrics. Studies in depth of new developments and research findings in the areas 

of warp preparation, design, weaving, and fabric formation. Two 1-hour lectures and one 2- 

hour laboratory period per week. Messrs. Porter, Berry 



380 The General Catalog 

TX 485 Mill Design and Organizotion 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisites: TX 303, TX 365 

Required of students in the Textile Technology curriculum. Beginning in the 1963 fall semes- 
ter, for seniors in final semester only 

Application of economic principles of textile factoring, hedging, and other buying and selling 
problems. Inventory control, organization, and departmental functions of textile companies. 
Technical problems of plant site selection, plant design and layout, and selection of equipment. 
Layout of a mill by each student. Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per 
week. Messrs. Grover, Pardue 

TX 490 Development Project I 1 (0-2) f s 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of instructor 

Elective 

A problem of independent study assigned to seniors in the major field of study serving also 

as the laboratory period for senior level courses. One 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Staff 



Knitting Technology 

TX 342 Knining Principles 2 (2-0) f i 

Prerequisites: TX 281 and TX 221 

Required of juniors in Textile Technology and Knitting Technology. A basic course in knitted 
fabric construction with emphasis on the many types of stitch structures found in knitted 
textiles. Attention is also devoted to the equipment and mechanisms necessary to produce these 
structures. Two 1-hour lecture periods per week. Messrs. Li, Middleton 

TX 441 Flat Knitting 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: TX 342 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology 

Elective for others 

A study of the leading types of flat knitting machines including warp knitting machines, design 

possibilities and fabric adaptability. Two l-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period 

per week. Mr, Shinn 

TX 442 Knitted Fabrics 3 (2-2) f t 

Prerequisite: TX 342 

Required of seniors in Textile Technology and Knitting Technology 

Design, analysis, and production of knitted fabrics, including flat, circular, and warp types. 

The economic aspects of the knitting process as a method of clothing production. Introduction 

to garment design, production and marketing. Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory 

period per week. Messrs. Shinn, Middleton 

TX 444 Garment Manufacture 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: TX 342 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology 

Elective for others 

A study of circular latch needle and spring needle machines for knitted fabric production. 

Styling, cutting and seaming of the basic garment types for underwear and outerwear, standard 

seam types; high-speed sewing machines. Two I -hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period 

per week. Mr. Shinn 

TX 447, 448 Advanced Knitting Laboratory 2 (0-4) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 342 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology 

Elective for others 

Systematic study of circular hosiery mechanisms; hosiery types and constructions. Seamless 

hosiery production methods utilizing the newer synthetic yarns, toe closing methods, finishing 

processes, and marketing are emphasized. Messrs. Li, Shinn 



Textiles 381 

TX 449 Tricot Knitting 3 (2-2) t 

Prerequisite: TX 342 
Elective for juniors and seniors 

A study of basic types of tricot knitting machines with emphasis on mechanisms and fabrics. 
Attention is given to warp preparation methods applicable to the tricot machine, the character- 
istics of yarn made from natural and synthetic fibers as they affect processing into warp knitted 
fabrics, machine settings for proper qualities and ratios; economics of warp knitting, and end 
uses. Attention is given to fabric design and analysis. Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab- 
oratory period per week. Mr. Shlnn 

TX 483 Textile Cost Methods 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisites: TX 303, TX 365 

Required of seniors in Textile Technology except those in Management. 

A study of cost methods af)plicable to textile mills with emphasis on calculations, the pre- 
paration of cost reports, and their use in cost control. Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

Messrs. Lynch, Middleton, Shinn 

Textile Chemistry 

TC 201 Textile Chemistry I 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 103, TX 281 
Required of juniors in Textile Technology 

A comprehensive course designed to familiarize the student with the chemical properties of 
all natural and man-made fibers; some emphasis is placed upon the relationship between 
molecular structure and physical properties; the principles and methods for producing man- 
made fibers are discussed; a brief survey of organic chemistry is included, particularly those 
parts that relate to polymer chemistry. Two one-hour lectures per week. Mr. Rutherford 

TC 303, 304 Textile Chemistry III 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 221. CH 223 

Required of juniors in Textile Chemistry 

A study of the action of chemicals on fibers; methods and chemistry of scouring, bleaching and 

mercerization; preparation of typical dyestuffs and their application to fibers. Two 1-hour 

lectures and one S-hour laboratory period per week. Mr. Hayes 

TC 307 Textile Chemistry II 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TC 201 

Required of seniors in Textile Technology 

A comprehensive course covering scouring, bleaching, and dyeing of textile materials. Also 
fabric finishing, effects of heat and chemicab on fibers, and the economic aspects of different 
dyes and chemical treatments on fibers and fabrics. Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab- 
oratory period per week. Mr. Hayes 

TC 403, 404 Textile Chemical Technology 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: TC 304, CH 223 
Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry 

Basic principles are applied to the study of three important areas of textile processing: dyeing, 
printing, and finishing. These areas are concerned with the chemical nature of dyes and 
other chemical agents applied to fibrous systems; with the chemical and physical properties 
of the various fibers; and with the mechanical aspects of the application of chemical materials 
to fibers and fabrics. The course includes an extensive review of the various classes of dyes 
and their application to all important textile fibers and blends of fibers; a comparative analysis 
of dyeing machinery and processes involving special machinery and equipment; a survey 
of modern preparatory and bleaching for all important fibers; a study of the roller printing 
machine, and the principles involved in print formulations for the major classes of dyes and 
their application to the various fibers; a study of important mechanical, additive, and chemical 
modification type finishes for fabric. Three 1-hour lectures per week. Mr. Campbell 

TC 405, 406 Textile Chemical Technology Laboratory 2 (0-6) f % 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry 

To be taken concurrently with TC 403, 404. Two 3-hour laboratories per week. 



382 The General Catalog 

TC 411 Textile Chemical Analysis I 3 (1-6) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 215 

Elective for students in Textile Chemistry 

Analysis and evaluation of textile chemicals and related materials such as water, soap, wetting 
agents, synthetic detergents, bleaching and stripping agents and finishing compounds. Identi- 
fication and quantitative determination of materials employed in several categories of textile 
wet processing such as sizes, surface-active agents, dyestuffs and finishes. One 1-hour lecture 
and two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. Messrs. Campbell, Cates, Rutherford 

TC 412 TexHIe Chemical Analysis II 3 (1-6) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 215. TC 304 
Required of students in Textile Chemistry 

Analysis of textile materials involving specialized instruments and techniques such aa spectro- 
photometry, pH measurements, electrometric titration, viscometry, etc. One 1-hour lecture 
and two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. Messrs. Campbell, Cates, Rutherford 

TC 421 Fabric Finishing I 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: TC 201 

Elective for students in Textile Technology 

Students in Textile Chemistry may not take this course for degree credit 
A general course in fabric finishing designed for students not majoring in Textile Chemistry. 
Emphasis placed on finishes used on garment-type fabrics, including stabilization finishes, water 
repellency, crease resistance, moth and mildew proofing, fire-proofing, etc. Emphasis on chem- 
istry of finishes varied to fit requirements of students. Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Hayes 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Textile Technology 

TX 501 Textile Technology Seminar 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of instructor 

Elective 

Lecture and discussion periods are designed for students who are particularly interested in 

yarn manufacturing aspects of the textile industry. Subject matter will include such aspects 

as training methods, safety programs, modern mill design, specialized techniques in setting 

rates, employee relations and developments that arise from technical meetings. Two 1-hour 

lectures per week. Messrs. Grover, Hamby 

TX 521 Textile Testing 11 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: TX 327 

Elective 

Advanced techniques for measuring properties of natural and man-made fibers, yarns, and 

fabrics. Interrelations of raw material, quality, processing characteristics, and end product 

properties. The application of the laws of physical sciences to evaluation of textile materials. 

Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week. Messrs. Hamby, Stuckey 

TX 522 Textile Quality Control 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: TX 521 
Elective 

Quality control systems for textile operations. Defect prevention methods, isolation of pro- 
cesses contributing to substandard quality, relationship between quality control department 
and operating divisions. Laboratory design, equipment and personnel selection, installation 
of quality control systems. Two 1-hour lectures and one S-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Hamby, Stuckey 

TX 524 Special Projects in Textiles 1 to 3 f s 

Prerequisites: TX 327, senior standing, permission of instructors 
Elective 

Special studies in either the major or minor field of the advanced undergraduate or graduate 
student. These special studies will take the form of current problems of the industry, inde- 
pendent investigations in the areas of textile testing and quality control, seminars and 
technical presentations, both oral and written. Staff 



Textiles 383 

TX 525 Advanced Textile Microscopy 2 (arranged) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 327 
Elective 

Experiments, lectures and demonstrations in more advanced techniques of textile microscopy. 
Detailed studies of structures of fibers covered in lecture series, supplemented by experiments 
on lecture topics. Detailed study of all types of microscopes and their uses in textiles. Pre- 
paration of slides for photography. Uses of photomicrographic equipment. Lectures and 
laboratory arranged. Mr. Stuckey 

TX 551 Complex Woven Structures 4 (3-2) s 

Prerequisites: TX 303, TX 478 

Elective 

The development of design specifications for complex fabrics as related to fabric geometry, 

functional and aesthetic properties and manufacturing limitations. Three 1-hour lectures and 

one 2-hour laboratory per week. Mr. Berry 

TX 575 Fabric Analytics and Characteristics 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 365 or TX 366 or TC 511 
Required of students in Fabric Technology 
Elective for others 

Correlation of fiber and yarn properties with those of the fabric. Fabric design features 
related to utilitarian as well as aesthetic values, with case studies of successful fabrics. 
Inspection and classification of defects with economic aspects. Engineering design of fabrics 
utilizing blends of fibers and yarns. Three 1-hour lectures per week, Mr. Porter 

General Textile Course 

TX 581 Instrumentation and Control 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 212 

Required of all seniors in all Textile curricula 

A lecture series with coordinated laboratory exercises designed to familiarize the student 

with the theory and application of instruments and control apparatus found in the modern 

textile plant. The studies cover the measurement and control of temperature, humidity, 

pressure, flow and liquid level, the application of control apparatus to chemical processes 

and physical finishing of textile products. Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory 

period per week, Mr. Asbill 

Textile Chemistry 

TO 501 Seminar in Textile Chemistry 2 (arranged) s 

Prerequisite: TC 403 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry 

The course is designed to familiarize the student with the principal sources of textile 

chemical literature and to emphasize the importance of keeping abreast of developments in 

the field of textile chemistry. Particular attention is paid to the fundamentals of technical 

writing. Reports. Lectures arranged. Mr. Campbell, Staff 

TC 511 Chemistry of Fibers 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CH 223 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry 

A lecture course emphasizing the theory of fiber structure; the relationship between the 

chemical structure and physical properties of natural and man-made fibers; the nature of 

the chemical reactions which produce degradation of fibers; the production of man-made 

fibers. Three 1-hour lectures per week. Mr. Rutherford 

TC 512 (CH 512) Chemistry of High Polymers 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 431 

Elective for Textile Chemistry students 

Mechanisms and kinetics of polymerization; molecular weight description; theory of polymer 

solutions. Three 1-hour lectures per week. Mr. Cates 



384 The General Catalog 

TC 521 TexHIe Chemical Analysis III 3 (arranged) f s 

Prerequisite: TC 421 or permission of instructor 

Elective for students in Textile Technology. 

No credit allowed for students majoring in Textile Chemistry. 

The work includes a survey of organic chemistry, with emphasis on organic surfactants, warp 

sizes, and fabric finishes of all types; the identification of fibers by chemical means; the 

qualitative and quantitative analysis of fiber blends by chemical means; the identification of 

finishes; the evaluation techniques for dyed and finished materials. Two one-hour lectures 

and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Graduate Staff 

Courses for Groduates Only 

TX 601, 602 Yarn Technology 3 (arranged) f t 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

This course provides the student with an opportunity for intensive study of advanced topics 

in the field of yarn technology. Messrs. Grover, Hamby 

TX 621 Texfile Testing III 2 (1-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 522 or equivalent 

Design of textile laboratories, including conditioning equipment and instruments required 
for specific needs; performance of tests and analysis of data on industrial problems; special- 
ized physical tests; inter-laboratory tests and analysis; study of A.ST.M. specifications and 
work on task groups for the A.S.T.M. Society. One 1-hour lecture and one 2-hour laboratory 
period per week. Mr. Hamby 

TX 631 Synthetic Fibers 2 (arranged) t 

Prerequisite: TX 430 or TX 436 or equivalent 

Lectures and projects on advanced problems relative to the properties and processing of man- 
made continuous filament and staple fiber yarns. Messrs. Grover, Hamby 

TX 641, 642 Advanced Knitting Systems and Mechanisms 3 (arranged) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 441 or equivalent 

A critical study of inventions which have contributed to the development of the modem 
knitting industry; knitting needles and their adaption for specific uses; means for mounting 
them for individual and en masse operation; construction and functioning of cooperating 
elements including sliders, jacks, sinkers, dividers, pressing elements, narrowing and tension- 
ing and draw-off motions, regulating mechanisms, timing and control chains and cams. Use 
will be made of patent literature which covers important developments in the hosiery 
industry. Three 1-hour lectures per week. Mr. Shinn 

TX 643, 644 Knining Technology 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 8 credits in Knitting Technology 

Problems of specific interest to the knitting industry will be assigned for study and investi- 
gation. The use of experimental methods will be emphasized. Attention will be given to 
the preparation of reports for publication. Graduate Staff 

TX 651, 652 Fabric Development and Construction 3 (arranged) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Application of advanced technology to the development and construction of woven fabrics. 

Mr. Porter 

TX 681 Textile Research Credits by arrangement 

Problems of specific interest to the textile industry will be assigned for study and investi- 
gation. The use of experimental methods will be emphasized. Attention will be given to the 
preparation of reports for publication. The master's thesis may be based upon the data 
obtained. Graduate Staff 

TX 683 Seminar 1 (1-0) f s 

Discussion of current scientific publications of interest to the textile industry; review and 
discussion of student papers and research problems. Graduate Staff 



Zoology 385 

TC 605 Physical Chemistry of Dyeing 3 (arranged) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 433 

Development of principles of thermodynamics, emphasizing applications in dye and fiber 

chemistry. Mr. Gates 

TC 606 Chemistry of Fiber-Forming High Polymers 3 (arranged) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 433 

Composition and structure of high polymers; properties of linear polymers with particular 
emphasis on mechanical behavior; chemistry of high polymer degradation. Three 1-hour 
lectures per week. Mr. Cates 



Zoology 



Courses for Undergraduates 



ZO 103 General Zoology 4 (3-2) f s 

The study of animals with special reference to the morphology, physiology, and ecology of 
those forms that illustrate zoological principles. Staff 

ZO 205 Invertebrate Zoology 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

The biology and classification of the invertebrate animals with special reference to the 
forms commonly encountered and those which illustrated zoological principles. 

Mr. Miller 

ZO 206 Vertebrate Zoology 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 or equivalent 

The biology, classification, behavior, and natural history of fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, 
and mammals, including laboratory identification of representative forms, local field trips, 
and student projects and reports. Mr. Quay 

ZO 212 Human Anatomy 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

A study of human anatomy with major emphasis on the structure and function of the 
muscular, skeletal, circulatory and nervous systems. Required of majors in recreation. 

Staff 

ZO 213 Human Physiology 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

.\n elementary survey of human physiology. The central theme is the changes in the human 
body accompanying increased physical activity. The nature and mechanisms of these changes. 

Staff 

ZO 223 Comparative Anatomy 4 (2-4) f s 
Prerequisite: ZO 103 

\ comparative morphology of vertebrates demonstrating the interrelationships of the organ 

systems of the various groups. Mr. Harkema 

ZO 301 Animal Physiology 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisites: ZO 103, PY 215 and CH 221 

Physiology of vertebrates with particular reference to man and the lower animals. 

Mr. Santolucito 

ZO 312 Principles of Game Management 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ZO 103, Elective for juniors and seniors not majoring in Wildlife 
This course is intended to provide the student with a basic understanding of the major 
principles of wildlife management. It is designed especially for those individuals who antici- 
pate entering the fields of agriculture, forestry, agricultural extension or rural and industrial 
recreation. Mr. Barkalow 



386 The General Catalog 

ZO 315 Animal Parasitology 3 <2-3) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

This course is designed to give students a knowledge and appreciation of the parasitic habit. 
The biology, life history, pathology and control of the common parasites of domestic animals 
and poultry are covered. M'^- Harkema 

ZO 321 Wildlife and Natural Resources Conservation 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in any school 

The importance of natural resources to man and the part they play in national and inter- 
national afEairs; the principles which under-lie their conservation and the impact of over- 
exploitation on primitive and civilized societies. Emphasis is placed on the renewable re- 
sources, particularly wildlife. Mr. Barkalow 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ZO 501 Ornithology 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

The biology and classification of birds. Field trips for the study and identification of local 
forms, including trips to Lake Mattamuskeet in February and the coast in May. Individual 
research projects on nesting populations. Mr. Quay 

ZO 513 Comparative Animal Physiology 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 301 

The comparative physiology of selected systems. Topics will be chosen for detailed considera- 
tion in lectures, collateral reading, and class discussion. Each student will, in addition, pre- 
pare a term report. A few topics for study may be determined by the interests of the 
students and by their needs as may be expressed by the supervisor of their major work. 

Mr. Santolucito 

ZO 520 Fishery Science 3 (1-6) f 

Prerequisites: ZO 103 and approval of the instructor 

This course is intended as an introduction to the principles and methods of fishery science. 
Current theories and practices of fish management will be studied. Life history and biology 
of important game and commercial species. Survey of fishery resources. Mr. Hassler 

ZO 521 Fishery Science 3 (1-6) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 520 

An analysis of fishery research methods and objectives. Detailed studies of the procedures for 
estimating fish populations, annual reproduction, mortality rates, growth rates, and exploi- 
tation rates. The relationship between natural fluctuations in fisheries and environmental 
factors. Mr. Hassler 

ZO 522 Animal Ecology 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: ZO 103 and BO 103 

The general principles of the inter-relations among animals and between animals and their 

environments— land, freshwater, marine. Mr. Quay 

ZO 541 Cold-blooded Vertebrates (Ichthyology) 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

The classification and ecology of selected groups of fishes. Lectures, laboratories, and field 
trips dealing with the systematic positions, life histories, interrelationships, and distribution 
of the particular groups of fishes selected in accordance with the needs and interests of the 
class. Mr. Hassler 

ZO 542 Cold-blooded Vertebrates (Herpetology) 3 (1-4) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

The classification and ecology of selected groups of amphibians and reptiles. Lectures, labora- 
tories, and field trips dealing with the systematic positions, life histories, interrelationships, 
and distribution of the particular groups of amphibians and reptiles selected in accordance 
with the needs and interests of the class. Mr. Hassler 



Zoology 387 

ZO 544 Mammalogy 3 (I.4) f 

Prerequisites: ZO 103, ZO 206, and approval of instructor 

The classification, identification, and ecology of the major mammalian groups. 

Mr. Barkalow 



ZO 545 Histology 4 (2-4) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

The microscopic anatomy of animal tissues. Mr. Robert* 

ZO 551, 552 Wildlife Science 3 (2-3) f ■ 

Prerequisite: ZO 206 

The principles of wildlife management and their application are studied in the laboratory 

and in the field. Mr. Hester 



ZO 561 Animal Embryology 4 (2-4) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

The study of fundamental principles which apply in the achievement of complex animal 
structure, including both invertebrate and vertebrate materials. Correlative laboratory study 
to provide training in the basic disciplines and techniques. This course is intended for 
advanced students in entomology, animal science, poultry science, and zoology. 

Mr. Alliston 



ZO 571 Special Studies Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: ZO 103 and approval of the instructor 

A directed individual investigation of a particular problem in zoology, accompanied by a 
review of the pertinent literature. A maximum of three credits allowed toward the bachelor'! 
degree, six toward the master's degree and nine toward the doctorate. Graduate Staff 

ZO 581 Parasitology 1 4 (2-4) • 

Prerequisites: ZO 103 and 223 

The study of the morphology, biology, and control of the parasitic protozoa and helminth* 

of man, domestic and wild animals. 

(Offered in fall semester 1963) Mr. Harkema 

ZO 582 (ENT 582) Medical Entomology 3 (2-3) 1 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312 

A study of the morphology, biology and control of the parasitic arthropods of man, domestic 

and wild animals. 

(Offered in spring semester 1962) Messrs. Harkema and Farrier 



Courses for Graduates Only 

ZO 603 Advanced Parasitology 3 (2-3) • 
Prerequisites: ZO 591 and 592 

The study of the theoretical and practical aspects of parasitism; taxonomy, physiology, and 

immunology of animal parasites. Mr. Harkema 

ZO 614 Cell Physiology 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ZO 103, and approval of the instructor 

A study of those fundamental physiological properties at the cellular level which are com- 
mon to nearly all organisms. Lectures, discussions, and critical reports (oral and written) to 
promote aquaintance with general literature and recent advances. Mr. Santolucito 



388 The General Catalog 

ZO 622 Seminar 1 (1-0) f s 

The presentation and defense of current literature papers dealing with the findings of 
original research or with fundamental biological concepts. Graduate Staff 

ZO 627 Zoogeography 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ZO 522, and approval of instructor. 

The geographic distribution of animals, with primary emphasis on land and freshwater 

vertebrates. Mr. Quay 

ZO 641 Research in Zoology Credits by orrangement 

Prerequisites: Twelve semester credits in Zoology, and approval of the instructor 
Problems in development, life history, morphology, physiology, ecology, game management, 
taxonomy, or parasitology. A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the master's degree, 
but any number toward the doctorate. Graduate Staff 



389 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 
The Alumni Association 

H. W. TAYLOR, Director of Alumni Affoirs 

The purposes of the Alumni Association are to promote the growth, prog- 
ress, and general welfare of State College; to foster among its former 
students a sentiment of regard for one another and continuing attachment 
to their Alma Mater; and to interest prospective students in attending 
State College. 

Membership Activities 

Active membership is available to all former students, regardless of 
length of stay at the College; members of the faculty, administrative staff, 
Agricultural Extension Service, Agricultural Experiment Station, teachers 
of agriculture in North Carolina high schools; and other persons who have 
successfully completed a short course at North Carolina State College and 
received a certificate therefor. 

Honorary membership consists of such distinguished persons as are duly 
elected to honorary membership in the association. The association meets 
annually during Alumni Week. Class reunions (scheduled in order that 
each class has a reunion every five years after graduation) are also held each 
year in connection with Alumni Week. Officers of the association are 
elected by the active members each year through the medium of a mail 
ballot. Local State College clubs are organized in most of the counties in 
North Carolina and in a number of cities in other states. 



Alumni Fund 

The Alumni Fund was established by the Alumni Association at State 
College in 1952 to replace the old dues paying program and provide a 
means through which the alumni may contribute to the advancement of 
the College. Each alumnus is invited to make an annual contribution. 



390 The General Catalog 

State College News 

State College News is published every month in the year by the Alumni 
Association and sent to contributors to the Alumni Fund. The purpose of 
the magazine is to keep association members in touch with the College and 
with each other. It carries news and pictures of students and former stu- 
dents and of the College. 

The Alumni Office 

Records of both graduates and nongraduates are kept by the Alumni 
Office. The master file includes information on all former students; other 
files are arranged geographically and by classes. Biographical files are also 
kept. 

Serving as a medium of communication between alumni and the Col- 
lege, the Alumni Office, located in the Alumni Memorial Building (for- 
merly the Old Infirmary Building), is official headquarters for alumni when 
they visit the campus. 



College Foundations 



L. L. RAY, Director 

Nine foundations, organized and incorporated under the laws of North 
Carolina, promote and support various State College programs. 

The foundations include the North Carolina State College Foundation, 
Inc., the North Carolina Agricultural Foundation, Inc., the North Carolina 
Dairy Foundation, Inc., the North Carolina Engineering Foundation, Inc., 
the North Carolina Textile Foundation, Inc., the North Carolina Design 
Foundation, Inc., the North Carolina Forestry Foundation, the Pulp and 
Paper Foundation, Inc., and the 4-H Development Fund, Inc. 

Stote College Foundation 

The North Carolina State College Foundation, Inc., was organized 
December 11, 1942, to foster and promote the general welfare of North 
Carolina State College and to receive and administer gifts and donations 
for such purposes. The Board of Directors is composed of alumni of State 
College and members of the Board of Trustees of the University of North 
Carolina. 

Agricultural Foundation 

The North Carolina Agricultural Foundation, Inc., renders financial 
assistance through supplements in the development of strong teaching pro- 
grams in agriculture and assist the Extension Service and Agricultural 
Experiment Station of the School of Agriculture at North Carolina State 
College. 



Foundations 391 

Dairy Foundation 

The North Carolina Dairy Foundation, Inc., aims to promote and im- 
prove all phases of dairying in North Carolina through education, research, 
and extension. A Board of Directors of 60 persons handles the affairs of 
the Foundation; these directors represent distributors, producers, and 
jobbers. 

Engineering Foundation 

The North Carolina Engineering Foundation, Inc., gives financial assist- 
ance to teaching, research, and extension in and through the School of 
Engineering. 

Textile Foundation 

The North Carolina Textile Foundation, Inc., was formed to promote 
the development of the School of Textiles, and was incorporated Decem- 
ber 31, 1942. Funds for this foundation have been raised largely from tex- 
tile manufacturing plants and other corporations and industries closely 
allied to textiles. 

Design Foundation 

The North Carolina Design Foundation, Inc., was organized January, 
1949. Foundation funds are used for the promotion and advancement of 
architectural education at North Carolina State College. 

Forestry Foundation 

The North Carolina Forestry Foundation was incorporated April 15, 
1929. The foundation has acquired a tract of land known as the Hofmann 
Forest, consisting of about 80,000 acres in Jones and Onslow counties, 
which is used as a demonstration and research laboratory for forestry 
students. 

Pulp and Paper Foundation 

The Pulp and Paper Foundation, Inc., was incorporated December 19, 
1954, by the southern pulp and paper mills, for the purpose of supporting 
the program of pulp and paper technology in the School of Forestry. 

4-H Development Fund 

The 4-H Development Fund, Inc., was organized in 1959. 4-H Develoj> 
ment Fund monies are used to promote and advance all areas of 4-H Club 
work in North Carolina. 



392 



The General Catalog 



Trustees 



The Consolidated University of North Corolina 

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh 

The Woman's College at Greensboro 

Board of Trustees 

Terry Sanford, Governor, chairman, ex-ofBcio, Raleigh 

Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent of Public Instruction, member ex-officio, Raleigh 

Arch T. Allen, secretary of the Board, Raleigh 

Miss Billie Curtis, assistant secretary, Chapel Hill 



Mrs. Oscar Barker 

Irwin Bclk 

Mitchell Britt 

Mrs. John G. Burgwyn 

S. N. Clark, Jr. 

T. J. Collier 

A. Roy Cox 

Eugene Cross 

Ben E. Fountain 

George Watts Hill 

John H. Kerr. Jr. 

M. C. Lassiter 

D. L. McMichael 

Rudolph I. Mintz 

Thomas O. Moore 

Ashley M. Murphy 

Mrs. B. C. Parker 

Mrs. Charles W. Stanford 

Thomas Turner 

John W. Umstead, Jr. 

Herman Weil 

Sam L. Whitehurst 

Macon M. Williams 



Term Expires April 1, 1963 

Cities 

Durham 

Charlotte 

Warsaw 

Jackson 

Tarboro 

Bayboro 

Asheboro 

Marion 

Rocky Mount 

Durham 

Warren ton 

Snow Hill 

Madison 

Wilmington 

Winston-Salem 

Atkinson 

Albemarle 

Chapel Hill 

Greensboro 

Chapel Hill 

Goldsboro 

New Bern 

Lenoir 



Counties 

Durham 

Mecklenburg 

Duplin 

Northampton 

Edgecombe 

Pamlico 

Randolph 

McDowell 

Edgecombe 

Durham 

Warren 

Greene 

Rockingham 

New Hanover 

Forsyth 

Pender 

Stanly 

Orange 

Guilford 

Orange 

Wayne 

Craven 

Caldwell 



Dr. Francis A. Buchanan 
Dr. Jesse B. Caldwell 
Lenox G. Cooper 
Marshall Y. Cooper 
Wilbur H. Currie 
Calvin Graves 
Mrs. Albert H. Lathrop 
Dr. John Gilmer Mebane 
Larry I. Moore 
Kemp B. Nixon 
Thomas J. Pearsall 
Clarence L. Pemberton 
James L. Pittman 
Mrs. L. Richardson Preyer 
H. L. Riddle, Jr. 
Roy Rowe 



Term Expires April 1, 1965 

Hendersonville 

Gastonia 

Wilmington 

Henderson 

Carthage 

Winston-Salem 

Asheville 

Rutherfordton 

Wilson 

Lincolnton 

Rocky Mount 

Yanceyville 

Scotland Neck 

Greensboro 

Morgan ton 

Burgaw 



Henderson 

Gaston 

New Hanover 

Vance 

Moore 

Forsyth 

Buncombe 

Rutherford 

Wilson 

Lincoln 

Nash 

Caswell 

Halifax 

Guilford 

Burke 

Pender 



Trustees 393 



W. Lunsford Crew 
John P. Stedman 
C. Lacy Tate 
Dr. John C. Tayloe 
H. P. Taylor 
W. Frank Taylor 
F. E. Wallace' 
Cameron S. Weeks 
Mrs. George Wilson 



Roanoke Rapids 

Luraberton 

Chadboum 

Washington 

Wadesboro 

Goldsboro 

Kinston 

Tarboro 

Fayetteville 



Halifax 

Robeson 

Columbus 

Beaufort 

Anson 

Wayne 

Lenoir 

Edgecombe 

Cumberland 



Arch T. Allen 
Mrs. Ed M. Anderson 
Ike F. Andrews 
^Villiam C. Barfield 
Mrs. J. W. Copeland 
Frank Hull Crowell 
Percy B. Ferebee 
Bowman Gray 
Herbert Hardy 
William B. Harrison 
J. Frank Huskins 
Mack Jernigan 
G. N. Noble 
Ernest E. Parker, Jr. 
Frank Parker 
Claude W. Rankin 
T. Henry Redding 
W. P. Saunders 
Evander S. Simpson 
Walter L. Smith 
Dr. Shahane Taylor 
Thomas B. Upchurch, Jr. 
C. M. Vastory, Jr. 
Hill Yarborough 



Term Expires April 1, 1967 

Raleigh 

West Jefferson 

Siler City 

Wilmington 

Murfreesboro 

Lincolnton 

Andrews 

Winston-Salem 

Maury 

Rocky Mount 

Burnsville 

Dunn 

Trenton 

Southport 

Asheville 

Fayetteville 

Asheboro 

Southern Pines 

Smithfield 

Charlotte 

Greensboro 

Raeford 

Greensboro 

Louisburg 



Wake 

Ashe 

Chatham 

New Hanover 

Hertford 

Lincoln 

Cherokee 

Forsyth 

Greene 

Nash 

Yancey 

Harnett 

Jones 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Cumberland 

Randolph 

Moore 

Johnston 

Mecklenburg 

Guilford 

Hoke 

Guilford 

Franklin 



\\''ade Barber 
Graham W. Bell 
Victor S. Bryant 
Henry A. Foscue 
Luther Hamilton 
W. C. Harris, Jr. 
W. A. Johnson 
Robert B. Jordan, III 
Mrs. J. B. Kittrell 
J. Hanes Lassiter 
John Lassiter 
John Van Lindley 
R. ^Valker Martin 
C. Knox Massey 
Reid A. Maynard 
William C. Medford 
William G. Reid 
Mrs. S. L. Rodenbough 

A. Alex Shu ford 

B. Atwood Skinner 
Dr. L. H. Swindell 



Term Expires April 1, 1969 

Pittsboro 

Fayetteville 

Durham 

High Point 

Morehead City 

Raleigh 

Lillington 

Mount Gilead 

Greenville 

Charlotte 

Smithfield 

Greensboro 

Lexington 

Durham 

Burlington 

Waynesville 

Pilot Mountain 

Walnut Cove 

Hickory 

"Wilson 

Washington 



Chatham 

Cumberland 

Durham 

Guilford 

Carteret 

^Vake 

Harnett 

Montgomery 

Pitt 

Mecklenburg 

Johnston 

Guilford 

Davidson 

Durham 

Alamance 

Haywood 

Surry 

Stokes 

Catawba 

Wilson 

Beaufort 



394 



The General Catalog 



Ben C. Trotter 
Oscar C. Vatz 
J. Shelton Wicker 
Fred L. Wilson 



Leaksville 
Fayetteville 
Sanford 
Kannapolis 



Rockingham 
Cumberland 
Lee 
Cabarrus 



Honorary Lifetime Members 

John Motley Morehead 
William R. Kenan 
Luther H. Hodges 



New York, N. Y. 

Lockport, N. Y. 

Department of Commerce, Washington, D. C. 



Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees 

Terry Sanford, chairman, ex-oflBcio, Raleigh 

Arch T. Allen, secretary, Raleigh 

Miss Billie Curtis, assistant secretary. Chapel Hill 



Term Expires July 1, 1962 

John W. Umstead, Jr. 
W. Frank Taylor 
J. Shelton Wicker 



Term Expires July 1, 1964 

G. N. Noble 
Wade Barber 
Reid A. Maynard 



Term Expires July 1, 1966 

Mrs. Albert H. Lathrop 
Mrs. B. C. Parker 
Victor S. Bryant 



Term Expires July 1, 1968 

Thomas J. Pearsall 
George Watts Hill 
Rudolph I. Mintz 



Adminisfrative Council 



North Carolina State College 

John Tyler Caldwell, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Chancellor, Chairman 

Fred V. Cahill, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Liberal Arts 

M. E. Campbell, B.S., Dean of the School of Textiles 

Ralph E. Fadum, B.S., C.E., M.S.E., S.D., Dean of the School of Engineering 

H. B. James, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Agriculture 

H. L. Kamphoefner, B.S., M.S., Dean of the School of Design 

Harry C. Kelly, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty 

J. B. Kirkland, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Education 

A. C. Menius, Jr., A.B., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics 

W. J. Peterson, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School 

R. J. Preston, A.B.. M.F.S., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Forestry 

L. L. Ray, Director of Foundations and Development 

J. J. Stewart, Jr., B.S., M.A., Dean of Student Affairs 

J. G. Vann, Business Manager 



College Policy 

By action of the Trustees, the General Faculty includes all members of the College's teaching 
force above the rank of Instructor and all general administrative ofiBces of the institution. In 
the President of the Consolidated University, the Chancellor of the College, and the General 
Faculty is vested final authority (under the Trustees) over all matters of College policy and 
activity. Under the General Faculty and Administrative Council, the Schools have separate 
Faculties and Administrative Boards (composed of all Department Heads) which have final 
authority over matters pertaining solely to their respective Schools, when not in conflict with 
Consolidated University and College regulations. 



395 

Teaching and Professional Faculty 

WILLIAM ELTON ADAMS 

Coordinator of Student Affairs, School of Engineering, and Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering, B.S., Ohio University; M.S., North Carolina State CoUege 
DONALD BRANDT ADCOCK 

Assistant Director of Music Activities, B.S., East Carolina College, M.A., Columbia University 
ALEXANDER VASTINE ALLEN 

Extension Professor of Animal Science, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, M.S., North Carolina 

State CoIIefre 
DUNCAN P. ALLEN, JR. 

Instructor in Evplish, B.A., Baylor University; M.A., Vanderbilt University 
JAMES GLENN ALLGOOO 

Extension Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S.. M.S., North Carolina State College 
CHARLES WALTER ALLISTON 

Assistant Professor of Zoology, B.S., M.S., Mississippi State; Ph.D., North Carolina State College 
FRED J. ALLRED 

Associate Professor of Modem Languages, B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina 
•RAUL E. ALVAREZ 

Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering, Dipl. in C.E., University of Buenos Aires, M.S., 

North Carolina State College 
MICHAEL AMEIN 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering; B.S., Stanford University; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 
CHARLES NOEL ANDERSON 

Instructor in Mathematics, B.EE., M.E. Math., North Carolina State College 
CLIFTON A. ANDERSON 

Head of Department and Professor of Industrial Engineering, B.S.E.E., A.B., University of South 

Dakota. M.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Ohio State University 
RICHARD LOREE ANDERSON 

Graduate Administrator and Professor of Experimental Statistics, A.B., DePauw University; M.S., 

Ph.D., Iowa State College 
ROY NELS ANDERSON 

Head of Department of Occupational Information and Guidance, and Professor of Education, B.A., 

University of Denver; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 
WALTER GLENN ANDREWS 

Extension Associate Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., North Carolina State College, M.S., Ph.D., 

Cornell University 
JAY LAWRENCE APPLE 

Associate Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State College 
ARTHUR ALEXANDER ARMSTRONG, JR. 

Research Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry, B.Che., M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State College 
FRANK BRADLEY ARMSTRONG 

Research Assistant Professor of Genetics and Bacteriology, A. A., Brownsville Jr. College; B.S., 

M.A., University of Texas; Ph.D., University of California. 
CLARENCE MONROE ASBILL, JR. 

Head of Department and Professor of Textile Machine Design and Development, B.S.E.E., Clemson 

College 
LEONARD WILLIAM AURAND 

Professor of Food Science, B.S., Pennsylvania State College, M.S., University of New Hampshire; 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State CoUege 
WILLIAM WYATT AUSTIN 

Head of Department of Mineral Industries and Professor of Metallurgical Engineering, B.S., Birming- 
ham Southern College, M.S., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
RICHARD CHARLES AXTELL 

Assistant Professor of Entomology, B.S., M.S., State University of New York, Albany; Ph.D. 

Cornell University 
ROBERT AYCOCK 

Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., Louisiana State University, M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State 

College 
ERNEST A. BALL 

Professor of Botany, B.S., M.S., Oklahoma University; Ph.D., University of California 
STANLEY THOMAS BALLENGER 

Associate Professor of Modern Languages, B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina 
WALTER ELMER BALLINGER 

Associate Professor of Horticultural Science, B.S., Rutgers University; M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State 

University 
ALBERT ALEXANDER BANADYGA 

Extension Professor of Horticultural Science. B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 
CLIFFORD WARREN BARBER 

Professor of Poultry Science, D.V.M., Colorado State University; Ph.D., Cornell University 
WILLIAM JOHN BARCLAY 

Professor of Electrical Engineering, B.S., Oregon State College; E.E., Ph.D., Stanford University 
ALDOS C. BAREFOOT, JR. 

Associate Professor of Wood Technology, B.S., M. Wood Tech., North Carolina State College; D. F. 

Duke University 
FREDERICK SCHENCK BARKALOW, JR 

Head of Department and Professor of Zoology, B.S., Georgia School of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., 

University of Michigan 
ALLEN VAUGHAN BARKER 

Post Doctorate Research Assistant in Soil Science, B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell 

University 
KEY LEE BARKLEY 

Professor of Psychology, B.A., Berea College; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 



•Leave of absence 



396 The General Catalog 

PEGGY WALDING BARNES 

College Union Assistant Social Director, A.B., Woman's College of University of North Carolina 
LUTHER WESLEY EARNHARDT 

Associate Professor of History and Political Science, A.B., Trinity College; A.M., University of 

Wisconsin 
WILLIAM JAMES BARON 

Assistant Professor of Product Design, B.A., in Industrial Design, University of Illinois 
JAMES FREDERICK BARRETT 

Assistant Professor of Military Science, Major, U. S. Army, B.A., Wesleyan University 
ROLIN FARRAR BARRETT 

Instructor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 
ELLIOTT ROY BARRICK 

Head of Animal Husbandry Section and Professor of Animal Science, B.S., Oklahoma A. & M. 

Collepe: M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University 
WILLIAM VICTOR BARTHOLOMEW 

Professor of Soil Science, B.S., Brigham Young University; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State University 
ANDREW JACKSON BARTLEY 

Associate Professor of Economics, B.A., B.S., M.A., University of Missouri 
DONALD GEORGE BASSETT 

Instructor in Engineering Graphics, B.S., North Carolina State College 
EDWARD GUY BATTE 

Hectd of Veterinary Section and Professor of AniTnal Science, B.S., M.S., D.V.M., A. & M. College 

of Texas 
ERNEST OSCAR BEAL 

Associate Professor of Botany, B.A., North Central College; M.S., Ph.D., State University of Iowa 
HOMER EDWIN BEAM 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education, B.S., M. of Agricultural Education, North Carolina 

State CoUepre; Ed.D., University of North Carolina 
EUSTACE O. BEASLEY 

Research Instructor in Aoricultural Engineering, B. S., North Carolina State College 
KENNETH ORION BEATTY, JR. 

P. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering, B.S.Ch.E., M.S., 

Lehigh University: Ph.D., University of Michigan 
NEIL McLAURIN BEATTY 

Instructor in Engineering Graphics, B.S., North Carolina State College 
JAMES F. BEEMAN 

Research Instructor in Agricultural Engineering, B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State University 
BURTON FLOYD BEERS 

Associate Professor of History and Political Science, B.A., Hobart College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

Univers'tv 
NORMAN ROBERT BELL 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, B.S., Lehigh University; M.S., Cornell University 
THOMAS ALEXANDER BELL 

Associate Professor of Food Science, B.S., Wofford College; M.S., North Carolina State College 
WILLIAM CALLUM BELL 

Head of Industrial Extension Service and Research Professor of Ceramic Engineering, B.S., North 

Carolina State College; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University 
JAMES ELWOOD BENGEL 

Counselor in Counseling Department, B.S., North Carolina State College 
ROY RAY BENNETT 

Extension Professor of Crop Science, B.S., North Carolina State College 
WILLIAM HARRISON BENNETT 

Burlington Professor of Physics, B.S., Ohio State University; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., 

University of Michigan 
EUGENE EDWARD BERNARD 

A.ssistant Professor of Poultry Science and Psychology, B.A., University of California at Berkeley; 

Ph.D., University of Leeds (England) 
RICHARD NEIL BERRIER 

Research Assistant in Textile Chemistry, B.S., North Carolina State College 
ERNEST BEZOLD BERRY 

Assistant Professor of Textile Technology, B.S., Clemson College 
CARLOS PAUL BICKFORD 

Research Instructor in Soil Science, B.S., Tennessee Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Oklahoma State 

University 
*RICHARD HUGH BIGELOW 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, E.S., Michigan State College; M.S.C.E., North Carolina 

State College 
GEORGE LEE BIRELINE, JR. 

Assistant Professor of Design, B.F.A., Bradley University 
ILHAN AHMET BIRKAN 

Post Doctoral Associate, M.S., Technical University, Istanbul; Dr. Ing., Technical University, Istanbul 
CHARLES EDWIN BISHOP 

Head of Department atid William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Agricultural Economics, 

B.S.. Berea College; M.S., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., University of Chicago 
CARL THOMAS BLAKE 

Ertension Assistant Professor of Crop Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 
•THOMAS CARLTON BLALOCK 

Extension Professor of Animal Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 
THOMAS JACKS BLALOCK 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, B.S., Presbyterian College; M.A., University of North Carolinm 
PHILIP EVERETT BLANK, JR. 

Instructor in English. B.A., Princeton University, M.A., University of North Carolina 
FRANKLIN DICKINSON BLANTON 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, Lt. Col., U. S. Air Force, B.A., University of North Carolina 
WILLIAM JOSEPH BLOCK 

Associate Professor of History and Political Science, B.S., Eastern Illinois State College; M.A., 

Ph.D., University of Illinois 



•Leave of absence 



Faculty 397 

WILLIAM LOWRY BLOW 

Associate Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State College 
GEORGE BENJAMIN BLUM, JR. 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 
THOMAS NELSON BLUMER 

Professor of Food Science, B.S., Pennsylvania Stat« CoUege; Ph.D., Michigan State College 
ROBERT STUART BOAL 

Extension Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., Pennsylvania State University, M.S., 

Cornell University 
ELIZABETH G. BOARDMAN 

Research Instructor in Crop Science, R.N., Presbyterian Hospital, School of Nursing, B.A., M.S., 

Rutgers University 
JOSEPH N. BOAZ 

Associate Professor of Architecture, B. Arch., B.S. Arch. Engr., University of Oklahoma; M.S. 

Arch., Columbia University 
JOHN FRANCIS BOGDAN 

Professor of Textile Technology and Director of Processing Research, B.T.E., Lowell Textile Institute 
CAREY HOYT BOSTIAN 

Professor of Genetics, A.B., Catawba College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; D.Sc, (Hon.), 

Wake Forest College, Catawba College; D. Honoris Causa, National University of Engineering, Peru 
HENRY DITTIMUS BOWEN 

Professor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State College 
LAWRENCE HOFFMAN BOWEN 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, B.S., Virginia Military Institute, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute 

of Technology. 
HENRY BOWERS 

Director of College Union, A.B., University of North Carolina; M.A., Columbia University 
THOMAS GLENN BOWERY 

Research Professor of Entomology, B.S., Michigan State University; M.S., Ph.D., Rutgers University 
WAYNE ELWOOD BOYET 

Research Instructor in Agricultural Economics, B.S., Louisiana State University 
EDWARD HOSMER BRADFORD 

Associate Professor of Textile Technology, B.T.E., Lowell Textile Institute 
GARNETT L. BRADFORD 

Instructor in Aaricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., University of Kentucky 
CHARLES RAYMOND BRAMER 

Professor of Civil Enaineering, B.S.E., E.M., Michigan College of Mining and Technolagy 
DOROTHY LAMBECK BRANT 

Instructor in Mathematics, B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin 
VESTER ROBERTSON BRANTLEY 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.A., M.A., Wake Forest College 
EUGENE PASCHAL BRANTLY 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, B.C.E., North Carolina State College, M.S.C.E., University 

of Illinois 
PAUL ARNOLD BREDENBERG 

Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion, B.A., University of Pennsylvania, Ph.D., Yale 

University 
CHARLES HENRY BRETT 

Professor of Entomology, B.S., M.S., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Kansas State College 
ROBERT V. BRICKELL 

Instructor in Social Studies, B.A., M.A., University of Mississippi 
RICHARD BRIGHT 

Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, B.S., M.S., State University of Iowa 
FRANK ELLIOTT BRILEY 

Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts, B.S., North Carolina State College; M.Ed., University of 

North Carolina 
CHARLES ALOYSIUS BRIM 

Research Associate Professor of Crop Science, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Nebraska 
KING RICHARD BROSE 

Research Associate in Engineering Research, B.M.E., B.I.E., North Carolina State College 
EDMOND JOSEPH BROWN 

Assistant Professor of Physics, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 
HENRY SEAWELL BROWN 

Associate Professor of Geological Engineering, A.B., Berea College; M.S., Ph.D., University of 

Illinois 
MARVIN LUTHER BROWN, JR. 

Professor of History and Political Science, A.B., Haverford College; A.M., Ph.D., University of 

Pennsylvania 
TALMAGE THURMAN BROWN 

Associate Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 
CHARLES DOUGLAS BRYANT 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education, B.S., M. of Agricultural Education, North Carolina 

State College 
RALPH C. BRYANT 

Professor of Forest Management, B.S., M.F., Yale University; Ph.D., Duke University 
JAMES SAMUEL BUCHANAN 

Extension Professor of Animal Science, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
'WILLIAM PAUL BUCHER 

Assistant Professor of Physics, B.S., University of Maryland; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 
PAUL BUISSON 

Assistant Professor of Architecture, French Government Diploma in Arch., Ecole Nationale Superieure 

des Beaux-Arts, Paris, France 
ROBERTS COZART BULLOCK 

Professor of Mathematics, B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Chicago 
HARVEY LINDY BUMGARDNER 

Extension Associate Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., North Carolina State College, M.S., Ph.D., 

University of Maryland 



•Leave of absence 



398 The General Catalog 

FRED VIRGIL CAHILL, JR. 

Dean of the School of Liberal Arts and Professor of History and Political Science, B.A., M.A., 

University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Yale University. 
JOHN TYLER CALDWELL 

Chancellor of North Carolina State College and Professor of Political Science, B.S., Mississippi 

State ColleEe: A.M., Duke University, M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Princeton University 
KENNETH STODDARD CAMPBELL 

Professor of Textile Chemistry. B.S., Clemson College; B.S., Bates College 
MALCOLM EUGENE CAMPBELL 

Dean of the School of Textiles and Professor of Textiles. Graduate of the New Bedford Textile 

Institute; B.S., Clemson College; M.S. (Hon.), New Bedford Institute of Technology; D. Tex., 

Philadelphia Textile Institute; D. Tex., Clemson College; Dr. Honoris Causa, National University of 

Engineering, Peru 
WILLIAM VERNON CAMPBELL 

Associate Professor of Entomology, B.S., M.S., Mississippi State College; Ph.D., North Carolina 

State College 
EMMETT JOHN CANADAY 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.A., William Jewell College; M.A. University of Missouri 
THOMAS FRANKLIN CANNON 

Assistant Professor of Hortieidtural Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., Ohio 

State University 
GEORGE LAFAYETTE CAPEL 

Extension Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S. M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., 

University of Florida 
THELMA JOYCE CARAWAY 

Instructor in Mathematics, A.B., Alabama College; M.A., University of Arkansas 
ALBERT CARNESALE 

Instructor in Nuclear Engineering, B.M.E., The Cooper Union; M.S.M.E., Drexel Institute of 

Technology 
ADGER B. CARROLL 

Instructor in Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., Clemson College 
ROBERT GORDON CARSON, JR. 

Director of Instruction, School of Engineering and Professor of Industrial Engineering, B.S., 

Clemson College; M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; Ph.D., University of Michigan 
ROY MERWIN CARTER 

Professor of Wood Technology, B.S.F., University of Minnesota; M.S., Michigan State College 
LEO THOMAS CARUTHERS, JR. 

Radiological Safety Officer of the Safety and Health Committee, B.S., University of Richmond 
GUY REED CASSELL 

Extension Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.A., University of West Virginia; M.S., 

University of Maryland 
DAVID MARSHALL CATES 

Assistant Director, Chemical Research and Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry, B.S., M.S., 

North Carolina State College; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 
TUNCER CEBECI 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, B.S.E.E., B.S.M.E., Robert College (Istanbul, Turkey); 

M.S.M.E., Duke University 
JOHN WESLEY CELL 

Head of Department and Professor of Mathematics, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 
RICHARD BRUCE CHALFANT 

Assistant Professor of Entomology, B.S., University of Akron; M.S., Ph.D., Universtiy of Wisconsin 
•DOUGLAS SCALES CHAMBLEE 

Professor of Crop Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina Stata College; Ph.D., Iowa State University 
LARRY STEPHEN CHAMPION 

Assistant Professor of English, A.B., Davidson College; M.A., University of Virginia; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 
JOE SENTER CHAPPELL 

Research Assistant of Agricultural Economics, B.S., North Carolina State College; M.S., Oklahoma 

State University 
JOHN ALLEN CHRISTIAN 

Extension Professor of Food Science, B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State University 
MARY ANN CIPOLLONI 

Assistant Statistician in Experimental Statistics, B.A., M.S., West Virginia University 
ROBERT JEROLD CLACK 

Instructor in Social Studies, B.A., University of Georgia; M.A., University of North Carolina 
LEWIS JAMES CLARKE 

Professor of Landscape Architecture, Dipl. in Arch., School of Arch., Leicester; Dipl. in L.D., 

Kings College, University of Durham (England); M.L.A., Harvard University 
WILLIAM SPURGEON CLARKE, JR. 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, Captain, U. S. Air Force, B.A., Wake Forest College 
JOHN MONTGOMERY CLARKSON 

Professor of Mathematics, B.A., Wofford College; M.A., Duke University; Ph.D., Cornell University 
ALBERT J. CLAWSON 

Associate Professor of Animal Science, B.S., University of Nebraska; M.S., Kansas State College; 

Ph.D., Cornell University 
CARLYLE NEWTON CLAYTON 

Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., Clemson College; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
MAURICE HILL CLAYTON 

Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics, B.S., Wake Forest College; M.E. Math., North 

Carolina State College; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
JOHN L. CLEMENTS 

Assistant Professor in Physical Education, B.S., M.A., University of North Carolina 
GROVER CLEVELAND COBB, JR. 

Assistant Professor of Physics, B.S., M.S., University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of Virginia 
FRED DERWARD COCHRAN 

Head of Department and Professor of Horticultural Science, B.S., Clemson College, M.S., Louisiana 

State University; Ph.D., University of California 



•Leave of absence 



Faculty 399 
columbus clark cockerham 

Professor of Experimental Statistics and Genetics, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., 

Iowa State College 
EMERSON ROSCOE COLLINS 

Extension Professor of Crop Science, B.S., University of Pennsylvania, Ph.D., Iowa State CoIIesa 
HERBERT COLLINS 

Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology, B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Duke University 
JOHN NOLAN COLLINS 

Extension Instructor in Rural Sociology, B.S., North Carolina State College 
JOSEPH JOHN COMBS 

Director of Student Health Service, M.D., Columbia University 
NORVAL WHITE CONNER 

Director of Engineering Research and Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., M.E., Virgrinia 

Polytechnic Institute: M.S., Iowa State College 
WILLIAM STOKES CONNOR, JR. 

Adjunct Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.S., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

North Carolina 
FREEMAN WALDO COOK 

Assistant Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., Texas 

A. and M. 
HILLIARD D. COOK 

Assistant Professor of Pulp and Paper Technology. B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
JOHN OLIVER COOK 

Associate Professor of Psychology, B.A., University of Chicago; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., 

New York University 
MAURICE GAYLE COOK 

Assistant Professor of Soil Science, B.S., M.S., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute 
HENRY CHARLES COOKE 

Associate Professor of Mathematics, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 
ARTHUR WELLS COOPER 

Assistant Professor of Botany, B.A., M.A., Colgate University; Ph.D.. University of Michigan 
NELVIN E. COOPER 

Assistant Professor in Physical Education, B.A., Elon College; M.E., University of North Carolina 
WILLIAM EARL COOPER 

Associate Professor of Plant Pathology B.S., Arkansas State A. & M. College; M.S., Oklahoma 

A. & M. College, Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
ALONZO FREEMAN COOTS 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, B.E., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
RALPH LELAND COPE 

Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering, B.S.M.E., B.S.Ind.E., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State 

Universitv 
WILL ALLEN COPE 

Research Assistant Professor of Crop Science, B.S., M.S., Auburn University, Ph.D., North Carolina 

State College 
FREDERICK T. CORBIN 

Research Assistant in Crop Science, B.S., Wake Forest College; M.Ed., University of North Caro- 
lina 
ROBERT MANGUM CORNISH 

Instructor in Social Studies, B.A., Amherst College, M.A., Columbia University 
FRANKLIN E. CORRELL 

Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 
HAROLD MAXWELL CORTER 

Professor of Psychology, B.S., State Teachers College (Lock Haven, Pa.); M.Ed., Ph.D.. Pennsyl- 

vania State University 
NICHOLAS CONSTANTINE COSTES 

Instructor in Civil Engineering. A.B., M.S., Dartmouth College; M.S.C.E., North Carolina SUto 

College: A.M., M.E., Harvard University 
ARTHUR JAMES COUTU 

Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., North Carolina 

State College 
HENRY MATTEUX COVINGTON 

Extension Professor of Horticultural Science, B.S., Clemson College, M.S., Louisiana State University 
THOMAS LEAK COVINGTON, JR. 

Assistant Director of Student Activities Department. A.B., Davidson College 
STUART D. COWARD 

Research Engineer in Industrial Extension Service. M.S., Syracuse University; B.S., Tri-State College. 
FREDERICK RUSSELL COX 

Assistant Professor of Soil Science. B.S., M.S., University of Nebraska, Ph.D., North Carolina 

State College 
JOSEPH H. COX 

Associate Professor of Design, B.F.A., John Herron Art School; M.F.A., University of Iowa 
DORIS LEE CRAIG 

Assistant Professor in Soil Science. B.A.. Winthrop College; M.A., University of North Carolina 
FRANK RANKIN CRAIG 

Professor of Poultry Science, B.S.. M.S., North Carolina State College; D.V.M., University of 

Georeia 
HARRIS BRADFORD CRAIG 

Assistant Professor in Food Science. B.S., Clemson College, M.S. North Carolina State College; 

Ph.D. Michieran State University 
MAX ARNOLD CRAIG 

Assistant Professor of Military Science, Captain, Ordinance Corps, U. S. Army, B.S.. Clemson 

College 
WINIFRED HARDISON CRANOR 

Research Instructor in Textile Chemistry, B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 
ALBERT ROBERT CRAWFORD 

Assistant Professor of Recreation and Park Administration, B.S., Appalachian State Teachers 

College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina 



400 The General Catalog 

JOHN WILLIAM CRAWFORD „ ^. ,. ^ ,. c. ^ n i, 

Extension Froje^sor of Rural Sociology. B.S., North Carolina State CoUege 

PAUL DAY CRIBBINS ^ tt c « .. . « a j 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, B.S.. Marine Transp., U. S. Merchant Marine Academy; 

B S C.E., University of Alabama, M.S.C.E., Ph.D., Purdue University 
JAMES URIAH CROWDER, JR. . ^ ^ „ 

Instructor of Engineering Meclianics, B.S., North Carolina State College 
KELLY RAYGENE CRUMP 

Instructor in Engineerina Graphics, B.S., North Carolina State CoUege 
GEORGE AUGUSTUS CUMMINGS „ . ^ , „^ ,. t, ^ tt- 

Assistant Professor of Soil Science B.S., Ag. Ed., M.S.Ag.Ed., Ph.D. Purdue University 
MAYNARD CLARENCE CUSWORTH „ c tt • -. * tii- • 

Assistant Profe.-^sor of Air Science, Lt. Col., U. S. Air Force, B.S., University of Illinois 
ROBERT DAVID DAHLE „ ^ , . c. . tt • -^ 

Extension Instructor in Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State University 
WALTER CARL DAUTERMAN „, ^ ,, . ., , „,. 

Assistant Professor of Entomology, B.S., M.S.. Rutgers University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
CHARLES BINGHAM DAVEY ^ ^ „ ^ ^ ^ „ _ 

Associate Professor of Soil Science and Forestry, B.S., New York State College of Forestry; M.S., 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
PHILIP HARVEY DAVIS 

Associate Professor of English, B.A., .M.A., Miami University 
WILLIAM ROBERT DAVIS , _ . t, • .. 

Assistant Professor of Physics, B.S., M.S., University of Oklahoma; Doktor der Naturuiss, University 

of Hanover (Germany) 
STEPHEN WALLACE DERBYSHIRE 

Research Associate in Engineering Research, B.S. in Ceramic Engineering, North Carolina State 

CoUege 
PAUL HAROLD DERR „ „ . _ 

Head of Department and Professor of Physical Education, B.S., University of Illinois; M.A., New 

York University 
JAMES WILLIAM DICKENS 

Research Instructor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 
EARL ROGER DICKEY 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, Lt. Col., V. S. Air Force, B.S., University of Maryland 
CHARLES WILLIAM DILL 

Instructor in Food Science, B.S., Berea College; M.S., North Carolina State College 
EMMETT URCEY DILLARD 

Associate Profer.sor of Animal Science, B.S., Berea College; M.S., North Carolina State College; 

Ph.D., University of Missouri 
DANIEL ROBERT DIXON 

Adjunct Professor of Economics, A.B., College of William and Mary; LL.B., Duke University; 

LL.M., New York University 
GEORGE OSMORE DOAK 

Professor of Chemistry. B.S. in Chemistry, B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Saskatchewan, M.S. 

in Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Pharmacology, University of 

Wisconsin 
WALTER JEROME DOBROGOSZ 

Research Associate in Bacteriology. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvaina State University 
SAMUEL HILL DOBSON 

Extension Professor of Crop Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 
JOHN FRANK DOGGETT 

Extension Assistant Professor of Soil Science, B.S., North Carolina State College 
WESLEY OSBORNE DOGGETT 

Professor of Physics, B.N.E., B.E.E., North Carolina State College, M.A., Ph.D., University 

of California, Berkeley 
WILLIAM EMMERT DONALDSON 

Assistant Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Maryland 
JESSE SEYMOUR DOOLITTLE 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering. B.S., Tufts College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University 
ROBERT LYLE DOUGH 

Assistant Professor of Physics. B.S., Guilford College; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State College 
ROBERT ALDEN DOUGLAS 

Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics, B.S.. M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University 
ROSS SWARENS DOUGLAS 

Extension Assistant Professor of Forest Management, B.S., North Carolina State College; M.F., 

Duke University 
LOUIS A. DOW 

Associate Professor of Economics, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., Indiana University 
MURRAY SCOTT DOWNS 

Assistatit Professor of History and Political Science. B.A., Randolph-Macon College; M.A., Ph.D., 

Duke University 
DONALD WILLIAM DREWES 

Assistant Professor of Psychology. B.S., Iowa State College; M.A., State University of Iowa; Ph.D., 

Purdue University 
JOHN WESLEY DUDLEY 

Research Assistant Professor of Crop Science, B.S., Purdue University; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State 

University 
JOHN WARREN DUFFIELD 

Professor of Silviculture, B.S., Cornell University; M.F. Harvard University; Ph.D., University of 
California 
GEORGE HEYWARD DUNLAP 

Director of Textile Placement Bureau and Student Activities and Extension Professor of Textiles, 

B.S.. Clemson College 
PETER JOHN DYSON 

Assistant Professor of Forestry and Agricultural Extension, B.S. A., Ontario Agricultural College, 

M.S.F., Montana State University; Ph.D., North Carolina State College 
FRED L. EARGLE 

InitMtrial Specialist in Industrial Extension Service. B.S., North Carolina State College 



Faculty 401 

JOHN BYNUM EASLEY 

Instructor in Enaltsh, B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina 
ARTHUR RAYMOND ECKELS 

Profeeaor of Electrical Engineering. B.S.E.E., University of Connecticut, M.S., Harvard University 

D.Ene., Yale University 
BOBBY ROSS EDDLEMAN 

Research Instructor in Agricultural Economics, B. S. Texas Technological ColIeKe; M.S., North 

Carolina State Collejfe 
PRESTON WILLIAM EDSALL 

Head of Department and Professor of History and Political Science, B.S., New York University; 

A.M., Ph.D., Princeton University 
JENNINGS B. EDWARDS, JR. 

Associate Professor of Physical Education, B.S., North Carolina State College: M.A., University of 

North Carolina 
JOHN AUERT EDWARDS 

Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics, B.S.M.E., M.S., North Carolina State College. Ph.D., 

Purdue University 
WILLIAM F. EDWARDS 

AsMstant Professor of Social Studies, B.A., Amherst College; Ph.D., Columbia University 
HERBERT GARFIELD ELDRIDGE, JR. 

Associate Professor of English, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
MAGDI MOHAMED EL-KAMMASH 

Instructor of Economics, B.Com., M.P.H., Cairo University 
GERALD HUGH ELKAN 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology, B.A., Brigham Young University; M.S., Pennsylvania State 

University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
ROBERT NEAL ELLIOTT 

Associate Professor of Social Studies, A.B., Appalachian State Teachers College; M.A., Ph.D Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 
DON EDWIN ELLIS 

Head of Department and Professor of Plant Patholony, B.Sc. B.A., Central College- M S 

Loui.siana State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
GEORGE LELAND ELLIS 

Instructor of Animal Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 

HOWARD McDonald ellis 

• nA ^^Jiff"^]"^, Professor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., North Carolina State College 
IRA JOEL ELLIS 

rn.^ ^.^Jr?!'"'-'".''^ '^^'^'^ Science and Food Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 
ERIC LOUIS ELLWOOD 

Head of Department and Professor of Wood Science and Technology, B.S., M.S., University of 

Melbourne, Ph.D., Yale University 
MUNIR RIDHA EL-SADEN 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., University of Denver, M.S., Ph.D., University 

of Michigan 
DONALD ALLEN EMERY 

Associate Professor of Crop Science. B.S., M.S., University of New Hampshire: Ph.D., University 

of Wisconsin 
CHARLES BENNETT ENGLAND 

Research Instructor of Soil Science, B.S., M.S., University of Georgia 
ARSEV HUSNU ERASLAN 

Instructor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Robert College 
NORMAN GILBERT ERIKSEN 

Assistant Professor of Military Science, Captain, Infantry. U.S. Army, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute 
JOHN LINCOLN ETCHELLS 

......^''2^^'""^ ^- ^°°'^ Science, (Coop. USDA) B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State College 

JAMES B. EVANS 

Professor of Bacteriology, B.S., Houghton College: Ph.D., Cornell University 
JAMES PEEK EVERETT, JR. 

Assistant Professor of Animal Science, B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute: M.S., University of 

Kentucky; Ph.D., Michigan State University 
RALPH EIGIL FADUM 

Dean of the School of Engineering and Professor of Civil Engineering; B.S.C.E. University of 

Illinoia: M.S.E.. S.D., Harvard University 
HARRY FAGAN, JR. 

Assistant Director of Student Health Services, M.D., Bowman C?ray Medical College of Wake Forest 
EMOL ATWOOD FAILS 

Professor of Economics, B.S., Southwestern Institute of Technology, Oklahoma: M.A., Ph.D. Pea- 
body College '' 
•DAVID IRVING FAIRBANKS 

Instructor of Electrical Engineering, B.S.. E.E., Syracuse University; M.S., University of Buffalo 
JOHN CHRISTOPHER FARRELL ouuitio 

Instructor of H'sfory and Political Science. M.A., University of Minnesota 
MAURICE HIGH FARRIER 

Associate Professor of Entomology and Forestry, B.S., M.S., Iowa State College: Ph.D., North 

Carolina State College 
JOHN CLYDE FERGUSON 

Frfcnsior' Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., North Carolina State College 
JAMES K. FERRELL 

Professor of Chemical Engineering, B.S., M.S., University of Missouri; Ph.D., North Carolina 

State College 
HUGH MARTIN FIELDS 

Extension Assistant Professor of Wildlife Biology, Department of Zoology, B.S., North Carolina 

State College 
WILLIAM THOMAS FIKE 

Assistant Professor of Crop Science, B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State University 



• Leave of obsence 



402 The General Catalog 

ALVA LEROY F[NKNER 

Adjunct Professor of ExperimentaL Statistics, B.S., Colorado A. & M. College; M.S., Kansas State 

College; Ph.D., North Carolina State College 
ALMON SUTPHEN FISH, JR. 

Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science, B.S., Bates College; M.S., Kansas State College; Ph.D., 

University of California 
CHARLES PAGE FISHER, JR. 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. B.C.E., University of Virginia, S.M., Harvard University; 

Ph.D., North Carolina State College 
JAMES WALTER FITTS 

Head of Department and Professor of Soil Science, B.S., Nebraska State Teachers College; M.S., 

University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Iowa State College 
•WALTER CURTIS FITZGERALD, JR. 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion, B.S., Wake Forest College; B.D., Southern Baptist 

Theological Seminary 
KATHERINE B. FLEMING 

Counselor in Counseling Department, A.B., Coker College 
WILTON LEE FLEMING 

Assistant Director of Student Housing Department, B.S., North Carolina State College 
HARRON O'BERRY FLOYD, JR. 

Instructor in Physical Education, B.A., Wake Forest College; M.A., University of North Carolina 
HOMER CLIFTON FOLKS 

Assistant Director of Instruction, School of Agriculture; Director of the North Carolina Agricul- 
tural Institute; Associate Professor of Soil Science, B.S., Oklahoma A. & M.; Ph.D., Iowa State 

College 
HUGH RAYMOND FORDYCE 

Assistant Director for Admissions, B.S., M.A., West Virginia University 
JULIAN MARK FORE 

Professor of Aaricultural Engineering, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Purdue University 
CHARLES IRVING FOSTER 

Professor of Social Studies, B.A., Princeton University; M.A., Harvard University 
ALVIN MARCUS FOUNTAIN 

Professor of English, B.E., M.S., North Carolina State College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., 

Peabodv College 
ANNA CLYDE FRAKER 

Research Associate in Engineering Research, B.S., Furman University; M.S., North Carolina State 

College 
LEON DAVID FREEDMAN 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 
RAOUL MANUEL FREYRE 

Assistant Professor of Physics, Ph.D., University of Havana (Cuba) 
DANIEL FROMM 

Associate Professor of Food Science, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College 
JAMES SPENCER FULGHUM 

Housing Rental Officer, Student Housing Department, B.S., North Carolina State College 
GENE JOHN GALLETTA 

Assistant Professor in Horticultural Science, B.S., University of Maryland; M.S., Rutgers University; 

Ph.D. University of California 
GERALD GARB 

Assistant Professor of Economics, B.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

California 
BERT HOWARD GARCIA, JR. 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Pennsylvania State University 
MONROE EVANS GARDNER 

Professor of Horticultural Science. B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
HENRY WILBURN GARREN 

Head of Department and Professor of Poultry Science, A.B., University of North Carolina; B.S., 

North Carolina State College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Maryland 
MARTHA JOHNSON GARREN 

Instructor in Mathematics, A.B., University of North Carolina 
HOWARD REID GARRIS 

Extension Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., M.S., Nerth Carolina State College 
FLOYD PHILLIP GEHRES 

Assistant Professor of Industrial Education, B.S., Bowling Green State University, M.A., Ohio State 

University 
DICK LEON GEORGE 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.S., Oklahoma State University, Ph.D., Duke University 
JAMES DALTON GEORGE 

Extension Associate Professor of Animal Science, B.S., Mississippi State University, M.S., North Caro- 
lina State College 
EDMUND JOSEPH GERNT 

Research Assistant in Textile Technology, Certificate, Rhode Island School of Design; Diploma, La 

Salle Extension University 
DAN ULRICH GERSTEL 

Professor of Crop Science, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of California 
FORREST WILLIAM GETZEN 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, B.S., Virginia Military Institute, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute 

of Technology 
WILLIAM BEST GILBERT 

Assistant Professor of Crop Science, B.S., Berea College; M.S., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., 

North Carolina State College 
JOHN HOYT GILLIAM 

Extension Instructor in Forest Management, B.S., North Carolina State College 
ROBERT C. GILMORE 

Superintendent Wood Products Laboratory, B.S., Pennsylvania State College; M.W.T., North Caro- 
lina State College 



•Leave of absence 



Faculty 403 

EDWARD WALKER GLAZENER 

Director of Inatruction, School of Agriculture, and Professor of Poultry Science. B.S.. North Caro- 
lina State College; M.S., Ph.D.. University of Maryland ""ri,u u«ro- 
KARL BROWNING GLENN 

JOHn'^WOMBLE^GLOVER "^ ^'*'""<'°^ Engineering. B.E.. M.S., North Carolina State College 
JER2'?'e.*'gI.OWCZEWSKI ^'■''^*^*'"" "^ Agricultural Engineering. B.S., North Carolina State Colleg. 
THOaA^s''mARION^GOD^BOLD^'^'''''**''*'*'^*' ^'P'""**' Warsaw Higher Engineering School 
MARVrN'^ALPH^ODFREY ^"*"'"**'''"^' ^■^' ^•^•' University of South Carolina 
ALFRED ''jOHN GOETZe' "^ ^'°^ Science (NCCIA). B.S.. North Carolina State College 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering B.S., E.E., Drexel Institute of Technology; M Sc 
North Carolina State College -i.«ji~, 

EUGENE FRIZZELLE GOLDSTON 

LEMufrGOOD^^*'**''"* ^''°^*'^^°'' "^ -^"'^ Science. B.S.. North Carolina State College 

Florida** ^'"'^^^^'''' "^ Animal Science. B.S.. M.S., West Virginia University; Ph.D., University of 

DORSEY McPEAKE GOSSETT 

nilS^'p/n*' M""f/n''^*T'" "l ^''"^ Science. B.S., University of Tennessee; M.S., University of 
-.. _ i'lino's. Ph.D., North Carolina State College 
GILBERT GOTTLIEB 

PERRY '^U N wood" GRADy'*'^^''^''' ""^ ^^^''''''^''^y- ^■^- ^-S.. University of Miami; Ph.D., Duke University 

ARNofo^HERBERf E'^WAio'^^GSN^AGr'''""' ^•'•'^•'=- ''°''*'^ ^"°""^ ^'^'^ ^°"^«« 
JOHN^LEwTs"'gRAy"'^*"'"*"*"' Sfatiatics, B.A.. Lehigh University; Ph.D., North Carolina State CoUege 
JOHN^H A yes' Gregory'' "'^ ^'"■^'*'^' ^•^•' Pennsylvania State College; M.F., Yale University 

MARGARErPFl^GE'^GRlGORt'^''' ^•'- ^■^■' """^^^ ^"°""^ ^'^'^ ^''^^^^ 

MAX IdW^'n ^GREGORY*' ^'^" ^■^■' ^^°"''^ ^*^*^ University; Ph.D.. University of Virginia 

Sroira^StltrToUege^'''^*'''''" "' ^"^"^ ^"■*'"'*' ^•^•' U°»^«"5ty of Tennessee; M.S., Ph.D.. North 
WALTON CARLYLE GREGORY 

William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Crop Science. B.A., Lynchburg College- MA Ph D 

charY^^pe^AVn ^r7y'er^= ^•''=- ^^"^"^'^'-^ ^''"-^ 

HAZEf^CORNk^A^GRlFFrN '"'""''■''""• ^•'- ''''"'''^°" ^''"^^^ 

JOHN^'eDWA^d'^GRIFFITH^''^''' ^•^■' U"^^^'"^"^ °f North Carolina; M.S., North Carolina State CoUeg. 

DANI^l'sWARTWOOD GROSCh"'''''^"'''"'' ^^'''"^»»'"- B.S.. M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

fanfr*"'' "^ ^*"*'*''«' ^-S- Moravian CoUege; M.S., Lehigh University; Ph.D., University of Pennsyl- 
HARRY DOUGLASS GROSS 
ELLIOt'brSwN^GROVER °^ ^^"^ ^'^^'""'' ^•^•' ^•®- ^"*^^'' University; Ph.D., Iowa State University 

Head of Departrnent of Textile Technology and Abel C. Lineberger Professor of Yarn Proceeeing. 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
GEORGE ALBERT GULLETTE 

fjniir^itv^^Ph n^'^'n ■""'^ •f''°-^f tS- ^f ^""'"^ Studies. A.B., Harvard University; M.A., VanderbUt 
University; Ph.D., University of Michigan 
FRANK EDWIN GUTHRIE 

GEOrS^'rIcHARD GWYNn'^"' ^■^" ^"'''^'■^**y °' Kentucky; M.S., Ph.D., University of lUinois 

StaTe"uni4r1^H""' '^''^^^^sor of Crop Science. B.S.. M.S.. North Carolina State College; Ph.D.. Iowa 

FRANK ARLING HAASIS 

WILLIAM^CULLEN ^HACKLEr""'"^^' ^'^' "''"^^"^^^ *»' California; Ph.D.. Cornell University 

PrS'::"NorWaZlina'starSnegt'''^''"""' ^■'''''■^- ^-S-^--^- ^ir.inia Polytechnic Institute; 
•ROBERT JOHN HADER 
JOHN^LOVELL "jJ^lT'*"'"''""^ Statistics. B.S.. University of Chicago; Ph.D.. North Carolina State CoUege 

rarilfnr' P^n*''^^'' "X ^/"'^ ,?'''*"''^' B.S. North Carolina State College; M.A.. University of North 

Carolina: Ph.D., North Carolina State College 

RUTH BADGER HALL 

WILLIAm'jACK^ON 'hALL^ ^''^"'^ I-anflwaffes. B.A.. Oberlin College; M.A., University of North Carolina 

Associate Professor of Statistics at Chapel Hill. A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., University 
w.„°^ Michigan; Ph.D., University of North Carolina ' ^'"^«™»'^ 

MAX HALPEREN 

DAMe'^SCOTT HAMBY ^ "^ English. B.S., City College of New York; M.A., Ph.D.. Florida State University 
CHARrrs'^ORA^E^'HtMILTON'''''''^^' ^•'- ^'^'""^ Polytechnic Institute 

Jrtv.'T«?^*f ^T^^^r f?'''<'"ff"'4;''«'^ ^''^t^"\?f ^"'■"^ Sociology. B.S., Southern Methodist Univer- 
sity; M.S., A and M College of Texas; Ph.D., University of North Carolina 



•Leave of absence 



404 The General Catalog 

ROBERT HILLERY HAMILTON 

WiUiam Neal Reynolds Research AsBMant Professor in Crop Science, B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., 

Ph.D., Michigan State University 
LEONARD ALBERT HAMPTON 

Extension Instructor of Forest Management, B.S., University of Georgia 
DONALD JOSEPH HANSEN 

Assistant Professor of Mathematies, B.S., M.S., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., University 

of Texas 
DURWIN M. HANSON 

Head of Department and Professor of Industrial Education, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State University 
KARL P. HANSON 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S., University of Michigan 
WARREN D. HANSON 

Professor of Genetics, B.S., University of Minnesota; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University 
JOSEPH GILBERT HARDEE 

Assistant Professor of Sociology, B.S. in Ag.Econ., Clemson College; M.S. in Rural Sociology, Ph.D., 

University of Kentucky 
JAMES WALKER HARDIN 

Associate Professor of Botany, B.S., Florida Southern College; M.S., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., 

University of Michigan 
ROBERT WILLIAM HARE 

Assistant Coordinator of Religious Activities, B.A., Pennsylvania State University; B.D., McCormick 

Theological Seminary 
HARRY ALLEN HARGRAVE 

Instructor in English, B.A., M.A., Vanderbilt University 
REINARD HARKEMA 

Professor of Zooloay, A.B., Calvin College; Ph.D., Duke University 
SADIE JENKINS HARMON 

Assristant Professor of English, A.B., B.M., Greensboro College; M.A., Ph.D., University of North 

Carolina 
CLEON HARRELL 

Associate Professor of Economics, B.S., M.A., University of Virginia 
CEORGE OLIVER HARRELL 

Instructor in Ceramic Engineering, B.S., Cer.E., M.S. Cer.E., North Carolina State College 
WALTER JOEL HARRINGTON 

Professor of Mathematics, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University 
HARWELL HAMILTON HARRIS 

Professor of Architecture, Pomona College 
JAMES RAY HARRIS 

Extension Veterinarian, D.V.M., Auburn University 
JOHN HENRY HARRIS 

Extension Professor of Horticultural Science, B.S., North Carolina State College 
CLARENCE A. HART 

Associate Professor of Wood Technology, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Ph.D., North 

Carolina State College 
JOHN REGINALD HART 

Rer>earch Associate in Industrial Extension Service, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 
LODWICK CHARLES HARTLEY 

Head of Department and Professor of English, B.A., Furman University; M.A., Columbia University; 

Ph.D., Princeton University; Litt.D. (Hon.), Furman University 
PAUL HENRY HARVEY 

Head of Department and William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Crop Science, B.S., 

University of Nebraska: Ph.D., Iowa State University 
HASSAN AHMED HASSAN 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., University of London; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois 
FRANCIS JEFFERSON HASSLER 

Head of Department and William Neal Reynolds Professor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Missouri; M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State College 
WILLIAM WALTON HASSLER 

Associate Professor of Zoology, B.S., M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., University of Tennessee 
STERLING NORMAN HAWKS, JR. 

Extension Associate Professor of Crop Science, B.S., North Carolina State Collese 
ARTHUR COURTNEY HAYES 

Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry, Ph.B., Brown University; M.S., North Carolina State College 
DON WILLIAM HAYNE 

Visiting Professor of Experimental Statistics, A.B., Kalamazoo College; M.A., Ph.D., University 

of Michigan 
FRANK LLOYD HAYNES, JR. 

Professor of Horticultural Science, B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., Cornell University 
RICHARD SHERMAN HEATON 

Associate Director of College Union, B.S., St. Lawrence University 
TEDDY THEODORE HEBERT 

Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., Southwestern Louisiana Institute; M.S., Louisiana State Univer- 
sity: Ph.D., North Carolina State College 
JOSEPH LEON HELGUERA 

Associate Professor of History and Political Science, B.A., Mexico City College; M.A., Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 
WARREN ROBERT HENDERSON 

Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science, B.S., University of New Hampshire; M.A., Harvard 

University: Ph.D., Ohio State University 
WILLIAM ROBERT HENDLEY 

Assistant Professor of Economics, B.A., Yale University 
WILLIAM RAY HENRY 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., North 

Carolina State College 
JOHN HERTZMAN 

Assistant Professor of Design, B.S., Illinois Institute of Technology 
FRANCIS EUGENE HESTER 

Assistant Professor of Zoology, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College: Ph.D., Auburn University 



Faculty 405 

WILLIAM NORWOOD HICKS 

Head of Department and Professor of Philosophy and Religion. B.E.. M.S., North Carolina Stat« 

CoUegre; B.A., Duke University; M.A., Oberlin Colleee 
WILLIAM LAWRENCE HIGHFILL 

Aeaociate Professor of Philosophy and Religion. B.A.. Wake Forest College; B.D., Southern BaptUt 

Theolojrical Seminary; Ph.D., Duke University 
CHARLES HORACE HILL 

Tu/M/l7^f B^'f u/.^.^e"'*''^ ^''^^^<=^' B.S., Colorado State University; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 
THOMAS IRA HINES 

Head of Department and Professor of Recreation and Park AdminiBtration. B.S.. North Carolina Stat* 
Colletre; M.A., University of North Carolina 
JUAN EDWARDO HISADA 

B«i..r^^*'^''^'t ^^^'s'"^'' of Textile Technology, B.S., North Carolina State College 
ROBERT G. HITCHINGS 

Associate Professor of Pulp and Paper Technology, B.S., New York State College of Forestry: M F. 

Duke University 
GEORGE BURNHAM HOADLEY 

Head of Department and Professor of Electrical Engineering. B.S.. Swarthmore College; M.Sc. D Se. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
LAFLOYO HUESTEN HOBBS 

TH0MAs'^n1wT0n'''hOBG0OD ''^JR "' ^""'^ Products. B.S.. North Carolina State College 
ARTHUr'^MABON^HOCH ^'"'^^'^''"' °^ ^"'■"^ Sociology, B.S., M.S.. North Carolina State CoUege 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education, B.S., Wake Forest College; M.Ed.. University of North 

Carolina 
CHARLES SASNETTE HODGES 

Research Assistant Professor of Forest and Plant Pathology. B.S.. M.S.. University of Idaho: Ph.D 

University of Georgia 
ERNEST HODGSON 

Assistant Professor of Entomology. B.S., University of Durham (England), Ph.D.. Oregon State 
Universitv 
FORNEY MOORE HOKE, JR. 

rii/.E^r**'i2^''A .^.'5Y'f.'«*'' •'* Physics. B.S., North Carolina State CoUege 
eUueNE HOLLAHAN 

ABRaSam"hOLTZM?n''*''' ^'^" ^^"P'''' ^^^^"^ University; M.A.. University of Tennessee 

Professor of History and Political Science, B.S.. M.A., University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D. 
Harvard University o , » u.^., 

HENRY ALFRED HOMME 

Extension Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.A., Augustano College (South Dakota): 
M.A., Michipran State University 
RUTH B. HONEYCUTT 

DALE^MA^^HOOVEr"'''*^'""'^' ^'^" ^^"®^'*y College: M.A., Duke University 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S.. M.S.. Iowa State College; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago 
MAURICE W. HOOVER 

,^u^,^^!.''f'.'^..°Lfj^^.^ ^"i^-^"^- B.S.A.. M.S.. Ph.D., University of Florida 
JOHN WILLIAM HORN 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, B.S.C.E., West Virginia University: M.S.C.E., Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology 
ROLF TOBIAS HOSEMAN 

yititinn Research Professor of Engineering Research, University of Marburg; DR.phil.nat., University 

of Freiburg: University of Tubingen 
IVAN HOSTETLER 

Head of Department and Professor of Industrial Arts. B.A.. Bluflfton College; M.A., Ohio State Uni- 
versity; Ed.D., University of Missouri 
BENJAMIN SAMUEL HOWARD 

JAMEs"dOUGLAs"hOWDE ^°"^""^**' ^■^■' '^■^- University of Tennessee 

Head of Department and Professor of Air Science. Colonel. U. S. Air Force, B.A.. A and M College 

01 Texas 
EZRA LEWIS HOWELL 

ERVIIsf GREGG HUM^PHRIe's ^^'"'''"''"'■'*^ Engineering. B.S.. M.S., North Carolina State ColleR-e 
M0RA^T"aUCe" Hu'n-T '" ^«"'''^"«''«^ Engineering. B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 

lecturer in Economics. A.B., University of North Carolina; LL.B., University of North Carolina Law 

r>rnooI 
CARLTON ESTILOW HUNTER 

Assistant Professor in Industrial Engineering B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology; M.S. North 

Carolina State College 
WILLIAM THORNHILL HUXSTER, JR. 

*.r«B^^'2^i'^.-'*1»^'°"* Professor of Wood Products. B.S., North Carolina State College 
uEORGE HYATT, JR. 

Associate Director of Agricjtltural Extension Service and Professor of AninuU Science. B.S., Michigan 
State College: M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

i«orw^''rro"J'«-,^riS(t^1^'' "^ Agricultural Information. B.S., M.S., University of Wisconsin 
LORlN ALBERT IHNEN 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics. B.S., M.S., University of Dlinois; Ph.D.. Iowa Stet« 

College 
WILLIAM PRENTISS INGRAM, JR. 

Assistartt Professor of Chemistry. B.S.. M.S.. Ph.D.. North Carolina State College 
MAKOTO ITOH 

Visiting Professor of Electrical Engineering and Mathematics. B.S.. Hiroshima College of Educa- 
LACDDi?? licc''""^' ^■^■' ^^°^° University (Japan); Ph.D.. Hiroshima University (Japan) 
M cKKILL Dec JAC KSON 

Instructor in Entomology. B.A., Marion College; M.S.. Virginia Polytechnic Institute 



406 The General Catalog 

WILLIAM ADDISON JACKSON 

Aasociate Professor of SoU Science, B.S., Cornell University; M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., North 

Carolina State College 
BRYSON LEMOINE JAMES 

Extension Associate Professor of Horticidtural Science, B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute; M.S., 

Ph.D.. Ohio State University 
HERMAN BROOKS JAMES 

Dean of the School of Agriculture and Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., North Caro- 
lina State College; Ph.D., Duke University 
BENJAMIN ANDERSON JAYNE 

Professor of Wood Technology, A.A., Boise Junior College; B.S., University of Idaho; M.F., D.For., 

Yale University 
JOHN MITCHELL JENKINS, JR. 

Professor of Horticultural Science, B.S., Clemson Agricultural College; M.S., Louisiana State Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., University of Minnesota 
JOSEPH WILLIAM JENKINS 

Assistant Professor of Military Science, Major, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, B.A., Mercer 

University 
HARLEY YOUNG JENNINGS 

Research Professor of Textile Chemistry, B.S., Adrian College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan 
CHIA REN JIN 

Research Assistant of Textile Chemistry, B.S., National Taiwan University; B.S., Auburn University; 

M.S., North Carolina State College 
KINGSTON JOHNS, JR. 

Assistant Director of Counseling Deparmtent, B.A., Guilford College, Franklin and Marshall College, 

M.A.. Ph.D., Cornell University 
CAROL HOLMES JOHNSON 

CoUene Union Craft Shop Director, B.S., University of Wisconsin 
ELMER HUBERT JOHNSON 

Professor of Sociology and Anthropology, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
JOSEPH CLYDE JOHNSON 

Associate Professor of Psychology, B.S., State Teachers College (Troy, Ala.); M.A., Ed.D., Peabody 

College 
WILLIAM HUGH JOHNSON 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State College 
WARREN EUGENE JOHNSTON 

Research Instructor in Agrieultural Economics, B.S., University of California 
WILLIAM RODGERS JOHNSTON 

Instructor in Chemistry, B.S., M.S., University of North Carolina 
ROBERT LAWRENCE JOHNSTONE 

Extension Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., 

University of Illinois 
EDGAR WALTON JONES 

Extension Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., Clemson College; Ph.D., North 

Carolina State College 
EDWARD McCUTCHAN JONES 

Extension Assistant Professor of Forestry, B.S., North Carolina State College; M.S., Louisiana Poly- 
technic Institute 
GEORGE DENVER JONES 

Extension Professor of Entomology, B.A., M.A., University of Missouri 
GUY LANGSTON JONES 

Professor of Crop Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., University of Minnesota 
IVAN DUNLAVY JONES 

Professor of Food Science, A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota 
JOHN CARLTON JONES 

Extension Associate Professor of Forestry, B.S., North Carolina State College 
LOUIS ALLMAN JONES 

Associate Professor of Chemistry and Crop Science, B.A., M.A., Clark University; Ph.D., A and M 

Colletre of Texas 
VICTOR ALAN JONES 

Assistant Professor of Food Science, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State University 
KENNETH ALLEN JORDAN 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University 
D. GRANT JOSLIN 

Instructor in Desinn, Diploma, Cleveland Institute of Art; M.F.A., Tulane University 
CHARLES HOWARD KAHN 

Associate Professor of Architecture, A.B. Math., University of North Carolina; B.Arch., B.O.E., North 

Carolina State College; M.S.Struc, Mass